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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Despite fierce opposition from two Baltimore senators, the state Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bill that would move most city liquor inspectors from a patronage appointment system to a merit system.The measure is seen as a first step to reforming operation of the city's liquor board, which oversees and licenses Baltimore bars.The three-member board and its 29 inspectors, 18 of whom work full time, are political appointees of the city senators.The bill would put the full-time inspectors under the city's civil service system.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
Regarding the editorial, "Incompetence at the IRS" (June 27), you state: "But recent testimony ... has conjured up a new image for the IRS - clueless, bureaucratic, disorganized and technologically incompetent. " May I say, as one who has followed the Internal Revenue Service for many years, that this is not new. Members of Congress have known this for years and have contributed to the situation in various ways. Republicans are now pointing this out because they can make political hay out of it. No one has ever lost an election by criticizing the IRS. What has been known for years at not only the IRS but also at other federal agencies is that there are serious problems with personnel, working conditions and funding.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to legislation that will move most of Baltimore's liquor board inspectors from a patronage system to a merit system -- a move seen as a first step in reforming the board's operations.Members of the House passed the bill 131-4. The Senate had approved the measure, and the governor is expected to sign it into law."It's long overdue," said Sen. Perry Sfikas, a Baltimore Democrat who co-sponsored the bill. "It is a solid first step. It finally begins to depoliticize the system."
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. declared yesterday that his administration's efforts to reform Maryland's juvenile services system are going smoothly and said critics who suggest otherwise are either misinformed or are taking shots for political reasons. He and other top officials said the state did the right thing in dismantling large residential programs for juvenile offenders, such as the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Baltimore County and the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County.
NEWS
April 19, 1991
The image of angry teachers, locked in a work-to-rule protest, has become a fitting metaphor for Howard County, which has been badgered by the recession into an identity crisis. The county simply does not have enough money anymore to support the elaborate service system it provided routinely in recent years, and when Executive Chuck Ecker responded with a proposed budget this week, the social fallout became disturbingly palpable.Facing a gaping $27 million revenue gap, Ecker, the consummate bottom-liner, laid off 40 employees, eliminated 119 vacant positions and denied raises to the remaining government workers.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
Regarding the editorial, "Incompetence at the IRS" (June 27), you state: "But recent testimony ... has conjured up a new image for the IRS - clueless, bureaucratic, disorganized and technologically incompetent. " May I say, as one who has followed the Internal Revenue Service for many years, that this is not new. Members of Congress have known this for years and have contributed to the situation in various ways. Republicans are now pointing this out because they can make political hay out of it. No one has ever lost an election by criticizing the IRS. What has been known for years at not only the IRS but also at other federal agencies is that there are serious problems with personnel, working conditions and funding.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Ned Martel of States News Service contributed to this article | September 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite its proposal to eliminate 252,000 government jobs, the Clinton administration's plan to "reinvent government" was warmly embraced yesterday by unions representing federal workers.Pleased that they had been included in drafting the proposal, leaders of the three biggest federal workers' unions welcomed the plan's promise to reduce the number of government management positions by 50 percent over the next five years, to include employees "in a true partnership" with management and to bring more flexibility and fewer regulations to the operation of government.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | March 1, 1991
A $9 million computer system designed to take the Port of Baltimore into the next century has largely failed its mission and amounts to the waste of millions of tax dollars, according to state officials.The Automated Cargo Release and Operations Service System -- known as ACROSS -- began operation in 1986. It was designed to allow port customers to clear documents with the U.S. Customs Service, communicate with one another, and perform other functions.But a combination of rapidly changing markets and shifting requirements by Customs has left the system without the number of users or functions it was designed for, said Brendan "Bud" O'Malley, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | October 17, 1991
Following an expensive and largely unsuccessful attempt to upgrade the Baltimore port's computer systems a few years ago, the Maryland Port Administration and the shipping industry are again looking at ways to improve port computer communications.MPA Director Adrian Teel said that, despite recent budget cuts and layoffs, he probably will increase resources in the Information Systems Department in an effort to improve computer services at the new Seagirt Marine Terminal and elsewhere.Meanwhile, a private sector port committee has been established to explore new ways to integrate existing computer systems in the offices of stevedoring companies, freight forwarders, shipping lines and terminal operators.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | December 6, 1993
Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital felt a pinch three years ago when companies began cutting employee benefits for mental health. Within a year it was a punch, and before the Baltimore area's oldest mental health provider could duck, its operating budget slid $5 million into the red.Today the Sheppard Pratt system of specialty care is crowing about a turnaround. For fiscal year 1993, its budget for everyday expenses fell short by only $286,000. Overall it earned $1.6 million, after a net loss of $2.5 million in 1992.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 29, 2004
A customer service telephone system run by immigration authorities is frustrating and inefficient, and in some cases has provided such bad advice that clients have been detained or deported, according to immigration lawyers, who are pressing to have the service scrapped. Last June, the Department of Homeland Security cut off telephone access to immigration offices around the United States, where most applications for citizenship or changes in immigration status are decided. Instead, the department's Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services directed the public to use a toll-free National Customer Service Center telephone system to resolve immigration-related problems.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
The General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to legislation that will move most of Baltimore's liquor board inspectors from a patronage system to a merit system -- a move seen as a first step in reforming the board's operations.Members of the House passed the bill 131-4. The Senate had approved the measure, and the governor is expected to sign it into law."It's long overdue," said Sen. Perry Sfikas, a Baltimore Democrat who co-sponsored the bill. "It is a solid first step. It finally begins to depoliticize the system."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Despite fierce opposition from two Baltimore senators, the state Senate gave preliminary approval yesterday to a bill that would move most city liquor inspectors from a patronage appointment system to a merit system.The measure is seen as a first step to reforming operation of the city's liquor board, which oversees and licenses Baltimore bars.The three-member board and its 29 inspectors, 18 of whom work full time, are political appointees of the city senators.The bill would put the full-time inspectors under the city's civil service system.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
Politicians say it is constituent service and bureaucrats call it coincidence, but nearly half of Baltimore County's 11 newest inspectors have ties to county officials.Critics charge that the recent hirings smack of old-fashioned political patronage -- running counter to a civil service system created decades ago to eliminate such practices.For example, County Council members forwarded the resumes of three inspectors, including one whose wife is a councilman's aide. Another inspector worked for County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger when he was a councilman.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | December 6, 1993
Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital felt a pinch three years ago when companies began cutting employee benefits for mental health. Within a year it was a punch, and before the Baltimore area's oldest mental health provider could duck, its operating budget slid $5 million into the red.Today the Sheppard Pratt system of specialty care is crowing about a turnaround. For fiscal year 1993, its budget for everyday expenses fell short by only $286,000. Overall it earned $1.6 million, after a net loss of $2.5 million in 1992.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau Ned Martel of States News Service contributed to this article | September 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite its proposal to eliminate 252,000 government jobs, the Clinton administration's plan to "reinvent government" was warmly embraced yesterday by unions representing federal workers.Pleased that they had been included in drafting the proposal, leaders of the three biggest federal workers' unions welcomed the plan's promise to reduce the number of government management positions by 50 percent over the next five years, to include employees "in a true partnership" with management and to bring more flexibility and fewer regulations to the operation of government.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. declared yesterday that his administration's efforts to reform Maryland's juvenile services system are going smoothly and said critics who suggest otherwise are either misinformed or are taking shots for political reasons. He and other top officials said the state did the right thing in dismantling large residential programs for juvenile offenders, such as the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in Baltimore County and the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | October 17, 1991
Following an expensive and largely unsuccessful attempt to upgrade the Baltimore port's computer systems a few years ago, the Maryland Port Administration and the shipping industry are again looking at ways to improve port computer communications.MPA Director Adrian Teel said that, despite recent budget cuts and layoffs, he probably will increase resources in the Information Systems Department in an effort to improve computer services at the new Seagirt Marine Terminal and elsewhere.Meanwhile, a private sector port committee has been established to explore new ways to integrate existing computer systems in the offices of stevedoring companies, freight forwarders, shipping lines and terminal operators.
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