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Service Requirement

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By Marego Athans and Mary Maushard and Marego Athans and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Maryland's high school seniors are doing much better on fulfilling their community service requirement for graduation.Fifty-nine percent of the state's public school students had completed the requirement, 75 hours of volunteer service, by July, up from 34 percent in February, according to the state Board of Education.Area districts where the smallest proportion of students had met the requirement were Baltimore (20 percent) and Baltimore County (37 percent). Anne Arundel had a 97 percent completion rate; Harford, 95 percent; Carroll, 64 percent; and Howard, 62 percent.
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NEWS
November 13, 2013
I support of letter writer Claudia Diamond's idea that new lawyer applicants in Maryland should be required to perform a set number of pro bono volunteer hours before being awarded a license to practice ("Bar exam does not a lawyer make," Nov. 7) I would even go a step further. Each lawyer should be required to provide a set number of pro bono hours each year of practice as well. We currently require our graduating high school students to perform a set number of volunteer hours as a requirement of graduation.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | December 6, 1992
The Harford County school system says it has come up with a painless way to meet the state's controversial student service requirement for high school graduation.Community service would be integrated into the school curriculum in grades six through 12, and students would not have to do volunteer work to graduate."We were opposed to the idea of mandating volunteer activities outside the school since its inception," said William B. Seccurro, supervisor for vocational and technical education and a member of the committee that came up with the proposal.
NEWS
By Tom Wieland | August 29, 2011
There is no single solution to America's interrelated problems of massive debt, high unemployment, youthful angst and general lack of civility in society. But any idea that could address several of these issues simultaneously would at least be worth trying. In that spirit, I offer one such proposal. Congress should consider enacting a law requiring every citizen ages 16 to 26 to spend at least one year in a service-oriented role in the community. This service could be in the military, the Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA)
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
In an attempt to bolster sagging applications to the country's military academies, a Senate committee yesterday approved a measure that would reduce the active duty requirement for graduates from six years to five.The provision, supported by Naval Academy Superintendent Adm. Charles R. Larson and by the superintendents of the other service academies, is expected to be brought before Congress before the summer break next month. The other academies are the Military Academy at West Point and the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | September 8, 1993
Leave it to the county's smallest high school to get the biggest name to speak at its opening assembly.Francis Scott Key High School students heard yesterday from a woman who has been the catalyst for getting a statewide student service requirement. And she credited a former Key teacher for helping to launch the new program."I call it service learning," Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, founder and director of the Maryland Student Service Alliance in the State Department of Education, told the students.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera | October 20, 1991
The county school board, superintendent and teachers association came out strongly this week against the state's proposal to require highschool students to complete 75 hours of community service before graduation.The opponents raised several objections, but in the wordsof Carl Roberts, director of secondary education for Harford schools, their concerns boil down to this: "Philosophically, we don't agree with mandatory service."That sentiment contrasts sharply with those expressed in hundredsof letters sent to the state school board by business owners and community leaders.
NEWS
By Megan McNeill and Megan McNeill,Contributing writer | October 9, 1991
Saying its members need more time to review proposed changes in graduation requirements, the Howard County PTA Council has delayed votingon the changes until next week.The state's proposed changes, which would include 75 hours of community or school service, are being reviewed by PTAs statewide in preparation for a public hearing Oct. 29before the Maryland Board of Education.The proposal sparked a spirited debate at the county PTA Council meeting Monday.Ellen Rennels, first vice president of the council, questioned where the schools would get money to implement the proposed changes.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
Only 1 percent of Howard County high school juniors are in danger of failing to fulfill their 40 hours of community service required for graduation next year, Howard County school officials reported last week.While 38 percent of the Class of 1997 has not officially completed the requirement, almost all of those students have made specific arrangements to perform their service, Margaret Foster, a student service coordinator for the county, told the Howard County school board at the board's meeting Thursday.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
With only a precious few days until graduation, at least 97 percent of the state's 43,135 high school seniors have completed the mandatory 75 hours of community service they need to get their diplomas, state education officials reported yesterday.The report shows a dramatic turnaround from the situation 10 months ago, when 40 percent of seniors had yet to complete the controversial new graduation requirement, to the alarm of many local school officials.But as of May 15, when the latest statistics were compiled, only 25 students statewide were "not making progress" -- 10 of them in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 27, 2009
When Laura Mullen scanned her seventh-grade daughter's last report card of the year, she spotted something unexpected: Hayley already had 70 of the 75 service-learning hours she needed to graduate. Months before, she'd only had 40 hours. And while Hayley had worked with her student government throughout the year, that didn't appear to be the source of the jump. "I have always thought it's mostly community-based hours - going out, volunteering," Mullen, of Baltimore County, said. But she and other parents have learned that the hours, once a point of fierce controversy, can accumulate through in-class projects and lessons.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
A foggy sky that threatened rain couldn't dampen the enthusiasm of Glenelg Country School students last week as they met near the intersection of Routes 32 and 108 in Clarksville. The students, along with alumni, parents, small children, faculty and staff, were there Saturday morning to plant 100 trees and help beautify the area in conjunction with Maryland's State Highway Administration. "I live near here, and so I'll be able to see how the trees will grow," said Glenelg Country sophomore Sabina Kaczanowska, one of 20 students who participated.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Laura Sullivan and Kent Baker and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
For more than a century, spectators have counted on the annual Army-Navy football game for the pageantry, pride and tradition of one of the most spirited rivalries in college sports. But one thing the game has not been known for lately is football. The Naval Academy and West Point have had an increasingly difficult time staying competitive during the past 20 years because their service requirements make it hard to attract talented players and because their academic standards are tougher than those at most football powers.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
The County Commissioners gave final approval yesterday to a long-delayed plan to extend public sewer service to 19 homes in the Cranberry section of Westminster.The $570,000 project is expected to solve years of health and environmental problems caused by leaky, failed septic systems in the Cranberry area.The county will install a low-pressure sewer system extension for homes along Old Manchester Road east of Lucabaugh Mill Road, just outside the northeast limits of Westminster. The extension will become part of the Westminster sewer system.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1998
Fewer than 30 high school seniors, out of 46,000 across Maryland, won't be graduating this spring because they failed to complete the state's community service requirement, according to state officials.That likelihood, based on preliminary reports to the Maryland State Department of Education, amounts to about 20 fewer students than were penalized last year. The Class of 1997 was the first that had to fulfill the controversial graduation requirement.A final accounting of the Class of 1998 will be presented to the Maryland State Board of Education late this month.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
High school students from Anne Arundel County and across the state came to Annapolis yesterday to defend the graduation requirement that forces them to complete 75 hours of "service learning" to receive their diplomas.Armed with anecdotes about such activities as organizing school cleanups or writing and printing children's books for a day care center, the students urged members of a House of Delegates committee to keep the community-service requirement intact."When I was a freshman, if I had not been forced into service learning, I would not have been involved in it," said Heather Keating, 17, a senior at South River High School.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
Despite a slow start in some counties, the state's high school seniors are moving steadily toward completion of their student service-learning requirements, state school officials have told the Maryland State Board of Education.As of February, only one-third of the Class of 1997 -- the first class required to do 75 hours of community service as a condition of graduation, under a 1992 requirement -- had completed their hours.But state officials say that as of Oct. 21, more than 29,000 of the state's 44,153 seniors, or more than 65 percent, had completed the requirement.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
Several current activities of Carroll County middle- and high-school students will count toward the new student-service requirement, according to a proposal presented to the school board yesterday.Board members were grudging toward the idea of a student-service requirement -- the state requires the board to have a plan but provides no money to carry it out.The board will vote on the plan at its next meeting April 14.The House of Delegates is considering legislation that would kill the service requirement imposed by the Maryland Board of Education.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
Nearly 80 percent of Maryland's high school seniors have completed their community service requirement for graduation, but only half of the Baltimore City 12th-graders are finished.With about three months left until graduation, they have not put in the necessary 75 hours of community service in activities such as reading to youngsters at neighboring schools or helping the disabled.According to a report to the Maryland State Board of Education yesterday, more than 36,000 members of the Class of '98 are done.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Anne Arundel's Republican delegates are trying to get county public school students out of performing the 75 hours of community service required for graduation in Maryland.Their bill, introduced in the House last week, would allow the Anne Arundel school board to lift the requirement. Efforts in previous years to end the requirement statewide have failed.The requirement, known as service learning, takes up class time as students do such things as scrape gum off desks, said Del. James E. Rzepkowski, one of the sponsors.
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