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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
When he was named to head the Maryland Transit Administration late last year, Ralign T. Wells enjoyed a brief honeymoon amid upbeat stories of the bus driver who rose through the ranks to head an agency with 3,300 employees and an annual budget of $617 million. His rapport with MTA riders seemed to weather the problems that arose during February's blizzards, which knocked the aboveground portion of the Metro subway out of service for about a week. But summer, with the wear and tear it brings to the vulnerable MARC system, is raising the heat on the 43-year-old administrator in multiple ways — including criticism from former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. With the MARC commuter train service afflicted with breakdowns and rider complaints, Wells and his agency have been thrust into the middle of this year's gubernatorial campaign.
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NEWS
July 15, 2013
On July 1, Medicare proposed a dramatic and disappointing reduction in dialysis payment rates that could jeopardize local dialysis care. As a dialysis professional I am responsible for some of the sickest and most vulnerable patients in Maryland, those with kidney failure who depend on dialysis three times each week to stay alive. Most people on dialysis, regardless of age, have Medicare. The new Medicare cuts worry me. The cost impact could result in reduced dialysis services and clinic closures at a time when kidney disease is rising in our state.
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BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder | February 25, 1991
In their recent, ground-breaking book, "Delivering Quality Service," professors Valarie Zeithaml, A. Parasuraman, and Leonard Berry offer new insights for improving service quality.* Only customers judge. Regardless of managers' or employees' tastes, standards, or insight, "Only customers judge quality; all other judgments are essentially irrelevant." If the customer thinks that service is too slow, the service is too slow.* Outcome plus delivery. Customers evaluate both the outcome and the delivery of service.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | August 14, 2010
Baltimore Gas & Electric has bragged since last summer about its proposal to install "smart," computerized electricity meters in 2 million Central Maryland households and businesses. "We are really at the cusp of one of the greatest transformations of the electric grid ever," Mayo Shattuck, CEO of BGE parent Constellation Energy, said last year. Smart meters won't just give customers more than $2 billion in savings, he said; they'll deliver "reliability, service quality and environmental benefits.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay and Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
State regulators proposed Wednesday that Verizon's ability to raise rates on some basic telephone services be directly tied to the company's efforts to improve customer service - a requirement that would be a regulatory first in Maryland. The proposed order from the Maryland Public Service Commission is in response to complaints from tens of thousands of customers who experienced lengthy delays in customer service in 2007 and 2008. "We're hoping that now this will provide the path for Verizon to remedy its long-standing statewide ... service problems," said Theresa Czarski of the state Office of the People's Counsel, which represents consumers' interests before the PSC. "This time Verizon won't be able to increase prices until they show they've made real strides in fixing service quality problems."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay | February 4, 2010
State regulators proposed Wednesday that Verizon's ability to raise rates on some basic telephone services be directly tied to the company's efforts to improve customer service - a requirement that would be a regulatory first in Maryland. The proposed order from the Maryland Public Service Commission is in response to complaints from nearly 80,000 customers who experienced lengthy delays in customer service in 2007 and 2008. "We're hoping that now this will provide the path for Verizon to remedy its long-standing statewide ... service problems," said Theresa Czarski of the state Office of the People's Counsel, which represents consumers' interests before the PSC. "This time Verizon won't be able to increase prices until they show they've made real strides in fixing service quality problems."
NEWS
July 15, 2013
On July 1, Medicare proposed a dramatic and disappointing reduction in dialysis payment rates that could jeopardize local dialysis care. As a dialysis professional I am responsible for some of the sickest and most vulnerable patients in Maryland, those with kidney failure who depend on dialysis three times each week to stay alive. Most people on dialysis, regardless of age, have Medicare. The new Medicare cuts worry me. The cost impact could result in reduced dialysis services and clinic closures at a time when kidney disease is rising in our state.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
Americans generally take high-quality telephone service for granted. Pick up a phone, you get a dial tone, the call goes through. You can't count on that in much of the world.Marylanders are among the most favored of Americans when it comes to phone service. Most are served by Bell Atlantic Corp., a company that is widely regarded as one of the best of the regional Bell companies in terms of service. Unlike some of its peers, the company takes genuine pride in the quality of its network, boasting in ads about its 99.99 percent reliability.
NEWS
August 10, 2007
Cell phones are ubiquitous these days. But there are plenty of Marylanders who still rely on a traditional telephone in their home. And they shouldn't be neglected or relegated to the bottom of the heap when service problems arise. It seems Verizon Maryland Inc. has been lax in servicing some of its residential customers, and the fact that its officials were unable to account for the problems this week suggests that state regulators have reason to stay on top of them. At a hearing called by the state Public Service Commission, the telephone company admitted that it missed more than 20 percent of its service appointments.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | August 14, 2010
Baltimore Gas & Electric has bragged since last summer about its proposal to install "smart," computerized electricity meters in 2 million Central Maryland households and businesses. "We are really at the cusp of one of the greatest transformations of the electric grid ever," Mayo Shattuck, CEO of BGE parent Constellation Energy, said last year. Smart meters won't just give customers more than $2 billion in savings, he said; they'll deliver "reliability, service quality and environmental benefits.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
When he was named to head the Maryland Transit Administration late last year, Ralign T. Wells enjoyed a brief honeymoon amid upbeat stories of the bus driver who rose through the ranks to head an agency with 3,300 employees and an annual budget of $617 million. His rapport with MTA riders seemed to weather the problems that arose during February's blizzards, which knocked the aboveground portion of the Metro subway out of service for about a week. But summer, with the wear and tear it brings to the vulnerable MARC system, is raising the heat on the 43-year-old administrator in multiple ways — including criticism from former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. With the MARC commuter train service afflicted with breakdowns and rider complaints, Wells and his agency have been thrust into the middle of this year's gubernatorial campaign.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay | February 4, 2010
State regulators proposed Wednesday that Verizon's ability to raise rates on some basic telephone services be directly tied to the company's efforts to improve customer service - a requirement that would be a regulatory first in Maryland. The proposed order from the Maryland Public Service Commission is in response to complaints from nearly 80,000 customers who experienced lengthy delays in customer service in 2007 and 2008. "We're hoping that now this will provide the path for Verizon to remedy its long-standing statewide ... service problems," said Theresa Czarski of the state Office of the People's Counsel, which represents consumers' interests before the PSC. "This time Verizon won't be able to increase prices until they show they've made real strides in fixing service quality problems."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay and Gus G. Sentementes and Liz F. Kay,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com and liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 4, 2010
State regulators proposed Wednesday that Verizon's ability to raise rates on some basic telephone services be directly tied to the company's efforts to improve customer service - a requirement that would be a regulatory first in Maryland. The proposed order from the Maryland Public Service Commission is in response to complaints from tens of thousands of customers who experienced lengthy delays in customer service in 2007 and 2008. "We're hoping that now this will provide the path for Verizon to remedy its long-standing statewide ... service problems," said Theresa Czarski of the state Office of the People's Counsel, which represents consumers' interests before the PSC. "This time Verizon won't be able to increase prices until they show they've made real strides in fixing service quality problems."
NEWS
August 10, 2007
Cell phones are ubiquitous these days. But there are plenty of Marylanders who still rely on a traditional telephone in their home. And they shouldn't be neglected or relegated to the bottom of the heap when service problems arise. It seems Verizon Maryland Inc. has been lax in servicing some of its residential customers, and the fact that its officials were unable to account for the problems this week suggests that state regulators have reason to stay on top of them. At a hearing called by the state Public Service Commission, the telephone company admitted that it missed more than 20 percent of its service appointments.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
Inside the cavernous Baltimore post office downtown, James A. Nemec watched as a stream of letters flew by like Indy cars through a noisy sorting machine. "I feel really confident," said Nemec, who is acting postmaster. "If the mail is inducted into this plant, it is going to be delivered." Neither he nor any other postal employee in Baltimore would have dared been so bold a few years ago. In 1994, Baltimore's mail service was ranked by PricewaterhouseCoopers as the worst in the country.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
The Treaty of Paris restaurant hasn't been a landmark in Annapolis for decades without reason. It's easily one of the best restaurants in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.It is pricey, but its small-town, historic atmosphere and superior food could rival any major city's best.Situated beneath the Maryland Inn on Main Street, Treaty of Paris offers a menu that includes local favorites such as stuffed ,, rockfish and unusual items such as Duck Duet Confit, a grilled duck breast covered in dried cherries.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1998
The Treaty of Paris restaurant hasn't been a landmark in Annapolis for decades without reason. It's easily one of the best restaurants in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.It is pricey, but its small-town, historic atmosphere and superior food could rival any major city's best.Situated beneath the Maryland Inn on Main Street, Treaty of Paris offers a menu that includes local favorites such as stuffed ,, rockfish and unusual items such as Duck Duet Confit, a grilled duck breast covered in dried cherries.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
Inside the cavernous Baltimore post office downtown, James A. Nemec watched as a stream of letters flew by like Indy cars through a noisy sorting machine. "I feel really confident," said Nemec, who is acting postmaster. "If the mail is inducted into this plant, it is going to be delivered." Neither he nor any other postal employee in Baltimore would have dared been so bold a few years ago. In 1994, Baltimore's mail service was ranked by PricewaterhouseCoopers as the worst in the country.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
Americans generally take high-quality telephone service for granted. Pick up a phone, you get a dial tone, the call goes through. You can't count on that in much of the world.Marylanders are among the most favored of Americans when it comes to phone service. Most are served by Bell Atlantic Corp., a company that is widely regarded as one of the best of the regional Bell companies in terms of service. Unlike some of its peers, the company takes genuine pride in the quality of its network, boasting in ads about its 99.99 percent reliability.
BUSINESS
By Gerald Graham and Gerald Graham,Knight-Ridder | February 25, 1991
In their recent, ground-breaking book, "Delivering Quality Service," professors Valarie Zeithaml, A. Parasuraman, and Leonard Berry offer new insights for improving service quality.* Only customers judge. Regardless of managers' or employees' tastes, standards, or insight, "Only customers judge quality; all other judgments are essentially irrelevant." If the customer thinks that service is too slow, the service is too slow.* Outcome plus delivery. Customers evaluate both the outcome and the delivery of service.
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