Advertisement
HomeCollectionsService Programs
IN THE NEWS

Service Programs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2000
State educators announced plans yesterday for a yearlong review of what students are doing to fulfill the community service required for high school graduation. The study - which will include the appointment of a task force in September - was prompted by growing concerns about the quality and consistency of the community service programs. "This is going to be a meaningful review," said Luke Frazier, director of the Maryland Student Service Alliance, the branch of the Maryland State Department of Education that oversees the program.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2014
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Juan M. Garcia recently recommended that farmers and ranchers who plan to participate in FSA programs register in advance. Producers are encouraged to report farm records and business structure changes to a local FSA Service Center before April 15. Enrollment for the disaster programs authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill, including the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) and the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Greg Tasker and Jackie Powder and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
Victims of rape and child sexual abuse told their moving stories of survival yesterday in an effort to convince County Commissioners not to approve proposed budget cuts to counseling programs."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A program that offers job training to Baltimoreans 55 and older is expanding. The Senior Community Service Employment Program offers paid training slots at government agencies and nonprofits to eligible city residents. City and state officials are expected to discuss an expansion of the program at a news conference Monday. Participants are paid minimum wage for 20 hours a week. The city has room for about 30 more individuals, although additional slots may become available, officials said.
NEWS
June 25, 1992
From earliest frontier times, Americans have put great stock in helping one's neighbor. Now, with the recent award of just under $3 million in federal grants to support local community service programs, Maryland has moved to the forefront of efforts to encourage the volunteer spirit.The money is part of some $70 million in awards disbursed nationally this year by the Commission on National and Community Service, the federal agency charged with turning President Bush's 1988 call for a surge of volunteerism that would be like a "thousand points of light" into practical reality.
NEWS
December 19, 1993
The state has awarded about $650,000 in grants to 10 counties and Baltimore so they can begin or expand community service programs for nonviolent offenders.With such programs in place, supporters said, judges will be able to sentence more offenders to community service instead of putting them in jail or on probation.That could free up jail beds and probation agents for more serious offenders. "I see this as a prevention measure so a first-time offender can learn something," Gov. William Donald Schaefer said at an awards ceremony in Annapolis last week.
NEWS
November 1, 1991
Former state School Superintendent Joseph Shilling is right on target in urging that community service programs are $$TC valuable tool for teaching civic responsibility and that such programs ought to be part of all students' educational experience. The state board of education recently held hearings on a proposal to make some form of community service mandatory for all Maryland students, and while there are many details to be worked out, the service proposal in some form should be adopted.
NEWS
By Keith Paul and Keith Paul,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
Impending state and county budget cuts are having a chilling effect on some human service programs employees who wonder whether they willhave jobs after funding is cut."A therapist who has been with usfor five years handed in her resignation because she can't live withthe uncertainty," said Lisa Goshen, executive director for the Howard County Sexual Assault Center.While the therapist was the first to resign because of a fear of layoffs, Goshen believes more may follow because of the insecurity brought on by the recent budget crunch.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
President Bush's signing of the National Community Service Act is welcome indeed. Mr. Bush walked into the White House calling for "a thousand points of light" in volunteer service, but his administration follows one that cut the funding of government agencies coordinating such efforts.National service for young people has been debated extensively for the past two decades. Although it is considered a good idea in the abstract, questions have arisen. Would it amount to a draft for peacetime service only for disadvantaged students who cannot afford tuition fees?
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | September 7, 1992
Washington. -- A hornet's nest of opposition erupted thi summer when the Maryland Board of Education voted to require students to put in 75 hours of community service as a condition of high school graduation.Atlanta, Detroit and Washington have similar requirements, as do many private schools. But this was the first time a state ever voted one. Maryland's teacher unions and school district bureaucracies complained instantly. The plan, they argued, will be too difficult to administer (translation: Don't work us any harder)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
When officials in Washington evaluate the consequences of the sequester, Tiara Bland wants them to consider the sixth-grade girls at Mother Seton Academy. Bland, a 22-year-old AmeriCorps member at the Baltimore academy for low-income children, said the decision by government leaders to impose across-the-board spending cuts will shortchange the urban youths who turn to her for advice on math problems and life. Bland, who aspires to be a school psychologist, is one of 17 AmeriCorps members performing education and literacy work in Baltimore for the Notre Dame Mission Volunteers.
NEWS
By Erek L. Barron | January 7, 2013
This just in: Maryland civil legal service programs not only benefit the poor but also save the state millions per year. Legal assistance to low-income Marylanders is a significant economic boost to the state and benefits more than just those receiving aid, according to a report just released by the Maryland Judiciary's Access to Justice Commission. Legal services mean a lot more than just helping people without means get access to the courts. For example, these services help low-income residents receive the government benefits to which they are entitled; prevent homelessness by avoiding eviction; and help protect against domestic violence.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
Sunday, June 10 Concert The chamber chorus, Voices 21, closes its season with a program featuring songs composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and Rodgers and Hammerstein at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, 6800 Oakland Mills Road in Columbia. There will be also be jazz performed by Paul and Glenn Scimonelli Brothers. Admission is free; donations accepted at the door. Information: 240-643-6563 or voicesxxi.org . Wednesday, June 13 Fundraising gala The Jewish Federation of Howard County presents its annual fundraiser, "Federation Live!"
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Jean Gartlan, a retired journalist and a Catholic Relief Services program director who worked in 1960s refugee relief in southern Africa, died of cancer Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88 and lived in Mount Vernon. "She was really a Renaissance woman," said Ken Hackett, former Catholic Relief Services president. "She was literary and traveled the world. She did some remarkable behind-the-scenes things, and ... you never knew she was there. " Born in New York City and raised in Washington Heights, she earned an English degree at the College of Mount St. Vincent and a second bachelor's degree, in journalism, from Columbia University.
NEWS
By Catherine Pugh and Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr | March 22, 2012
The Maryland Department of Education is about to make a very big mistake. Under the Education and Secondary Education Act (better known as No Child Left Behind), low-income families whose children attend low-performing schools are eligible to receive supplemental educational services outside of the regular school day. These services include after school tutorial services. The Supplemental Educational Services Program is federally funded through Title I. Tutorial services can be provided by private companies that are preferred providers approved by the MSDE.
EXPLORE
March 13, 2012
Suppose you had budgeted $5.9 million on something that ended up costing only $1.7 million. What would you do with that extra $4 million-plus? That's the enviable question Baltimore County gets to ponder as an almost-snow-free winter has nearly passed, leaving behind millions in unspent snow removal monies. The $1.7 million spent thus far this year is one-seventh of the $11.5 million it spent last year, which in turn was about half of the $20.8 million it spent during the winter of 2009-10, which included the "Snowmageddon" twin blizzards in February.
NEWS
January 31, 2009
I would make two points in response to Dan Rodricks' thoughtful endorsement of expanding national service programs and opportunities ("Americans poised to heed Obama's call to service," Commentary, Jan. 25). Mr. Rodricks writes that President Barack Obama should include increased funds for national service programs such as AmeriCorps in the economy recovery plan. The House of Representatives has anticipated Mr. Rodricks' idea and included $200 million for 16,000 additional AmeriCorps members to meet the needs of vulnerable populations during the recession in the stimulus bill it passed.
EXPLORE
March 13, 2012
Suppose you had budgeted $5.9 million on something that ended up costing only $1.7 million. What would you do with that extra $4 million-plus? That's the enviable question Baltimore County gets to ponder as an almost-snow-free winter has nearly passed, leaving behind millions in unspent snow removal monies. The $1.7 million spent thus far this year is one-seventh of the $11.5 million it spent last year, which in turn was about half of the $20.8 million it spent during the winter of 2009-10, which included the "Snowmageddon" twin blizzards in February.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
A major funder of legal services for the poor will shave its grants by at least 5 percent across Maryland — even after dipping into its reserves. The 34 agencies that receive money from the Maryland Legal Services Corp. have been told to submit requests for grants next month that are 5 percent below current amounts because it is facing a "significant" funding shortfall, said executive director Susan M. Ehrlichman. And the cuts may be deeper the following year. The nonprofit organization's two main funding sources — the surcharge on court filing fees for civil cases and the interest paid on short-term bank accounts for lawyers' clients — have been hit by the economy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.