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NEWS
January 25, 2005
Lawmakers to hold meeting on Assembly proposals Saturday The Carroll County legislative delegation has scheduled hearing for 9 a.m. Saturday in Room 003 of the County Office Building to hear public comment on several proposals for the 2005 General Assembly session. Among the issues is the county commissioners' proposed transfer tax. Several legislators have said they are deferring a decision on backing the 1 percent tax on real estate transfers until they can gauge public opinion. The Carroll County Taxpayers Association plans a "tax revolt" demonstration to coincide with the hearing, according to its spokesman, James Reter.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
While all Maryland students are required to complete at least 75 service-learning hours before graduation, many Baltimore County Public Schools students far exceed this minimum requirement - earning as many as 7,500 hours. Among those students who earned the commendable distinction of being the top service-learning leaders at their schools are Sasha Maraj, Dulaney High School; David Gleyzer, George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology; Amanda Becker, Loch Raven High School; Jasmine McNeill, Overlea High School; and Madeline Stiso, Towson High School.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
While all Maryland students are required to complete at least 75 service-learning hours before graduation, many Baltimore County Public Schools students far exceed this minimum requirement - earning as many as 7,500 hours. Among those students who earned the commendable distinction of being the top service-learning leaders at their schools are Sasha Maraj, Dulaney High School; David Gleyzer, George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology; Amanda Becker, Loch Raven High School; Jasmine McNeill, Overlea High School; and Madeline Stiso, Towson High School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Joseph A. Dabbah, a well-known former Baltimore watchmaker who kept his customers' wristwatches, pocket watches and decorative clocks on time and ticking for nearly half a century, died July 18 in his sleep at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 88. Mr. Dabbah, who had lived for more than 30 years in the Milbrook neighborhood near Pikesville, was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt. "He was 15 when his father died, and suddenly he was the man of the house. He was the oldest and had to help his mother with the other children," said his daughter, Claudette Jacobs, a registered nurse-educator at Howard County General Hospital who lives in Dayton.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 27, 2009
When Laura Mullen scanned her seventh-grade daughter's last report card of the year, she spotted something unexpected: Hayley already had 70 of the 75 service-learning hours she needed to graduate. Months before, she'd only had 40 hours. And while Hayley had worked with her student government throughout the year, that didn't appear to be the source of the jump. "I have always thought it's mostly community-based hours - going out, volunteering," Mullen, of Baltimore County, said. But she and other parents have learned that the hours, once a point of fierce controversy, can accumulate through in-class projects and lessons.
NEWS
September 3, 1996
OPPONENTS OF Maryland's mandatory program to have school children serve their communities ridiculed it as a contradiction: "Involuntary volunteerism." Such mockery misses the point.Would they also say the law compelling kids to attend school constitutes "mandatory thinking?" Besides, courts in other states with "service learning" mandates have ruled such programs are not "indentured servitude."If there is an inherent contradiction in Maryland's student-service program, it originated with the State Board of Education, which conceived a state mandate but didn't want it to look like one. It allowed local school systems to implement this concept as they saw fit, even if some hadn't a clue how to do so.Although Maryland's civic service program was the first tried on a statewide scale, early advocates knew what they wanted it to look like: Teens pitching in to make their neighborhoods better.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Andrea F. Siegel and Elaine Tassy and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
While virtually no student in Anne Arundel County failed to complete the 75 hours of "service learning" required for graduation, not nearly so many describe those hours as well spent and worthwhile.At Annapolis Senior High School, they ushered at a talent show and wallpapered the halls with anti-drug posters.At Northeast High, students brought in canned goods to be donated to a shelter for the homeless. About half the students, however, never went to a shelter or had contact with a homeless person.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
On Kristopher Buckler's first day with Reggie, he repeatedly instructs the 9-month-old golden retriever to rest - one of several basic commands the playful puppy will have to master during months of guide-dog training. Until Reggie is 18 months old, it will be Buckler's duty to familiarize him with different environments, such as the Wal-Mart that they would visit later that evening to get the puppy accustomed to crowds and automatic doors. With help from his family, Buckler will teach Reggie proper behavior and basic commands, preparing the dog for additional training with a professional guide dog instructor.
NEWS
March 12, 1997
AS MARYLAND'S first high school class required to do community service nears graduation, it appears that in most school systems this novel, controversial mandate is accomplishing what its proponents had hoped.Young people are doing some admirable work. They are assisting at nursing homes, bagging food for the homeless, helping with scout troops, mentoring younger children, cleaning up streams. Some are merely doing what they have to do to graduate, but others have gone beyond the required 75 hours -- a sign that they have developed a taste for community service that will continue through their adult lives.
NEWS
March 21, 1996
A MERE 15 months before graduation, 10,000 high-school juniors in Maryland have made no progress toward getting their high-school diplomas in at least one key area: the state education department's requirement that students fulfill 75 hours community service.After receiving reports last month on how students in each of the state's 24 school systems were faring, state Superintendent Nancy Grasmick's office quickly responded to help school systems that are falling behind. How Maryland, the only state with a community service component in its curriculum, handles these laggards will shape how seriously the requirement is taken.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | July 27, 2009
When Laura Mullen scanned her seventh-grade daughter's last report card of the year, she spotted something unexpected: Hayley already had 70 of the 75 service-learning hours she needed to graduate. Months before, she'd only had 40 hours. And while Hayley had worked with her student government throughout the year, that didn't appear to be the source of the jump. "I have always thought it's mostly community-based hours - going out, volunteering," Mullen, of Baltimore County, said. But she and other parents have learned that the hours, once a point of fierce controversy, can accumulate through in-class projects and lessons.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2007
Havre de Grace High School senior Kara Horning measured two cups of flour, poured it into a glass bowl and added salt and shortening. When the mixture started to resemble her idea of a piecrust, she slowly poured water into the bowl, while Tyrell Graves, 14, stirred. Kirsten Somers, their teacher in the class "Foods for Healthy Living," walked by and noted that the crust mix looked too watery. "Uh-oh. Did you just add a half a cup of water?" she asked. Kara looked from the mixture to the measuring cup. "Oh no, I put in a cup and a half of water," said the 17-year-old pie-making novice.
NEWS
By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,sun reporter | March 28, 2007
For the past seven years, the students at the Park School in Baltimore County have been raising money and hammering nails, refurbishing one home per year for Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity. Today, about a half-dozen students from the school are to share what they have learned at a national conference on community service. At the National Youth Leadership Council's annual Service-Learning Conference in Albuquerque, N.M., the Park students will discuss the value of helping others. They will also show that bake sales are not the only way students can raise money.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
While other students are relaxing during Howard Community College's winter break, 19-year-old Amber Gillette of Laurel is planning to do hard labor, knocking down walls and tearing up floors for free. "I'm looking forward to that," she said. Gillette is one of 10 HCC students who have decided to spend their break rehabilitating houses in Mississippi to help people who were affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The group leaves tomorrow under the guidance of Carol Parreco, coordinator of service learning for the college.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
While other students are relaxing during Howard Community College's winter break, 19-year- old Amber Gillette of Laurel is planning to do hard labor, knocking down walls and tearing up floors for free. "I'm looking forward to that," she said. Gillette is one of 10 HCC students who have decided to spend their break rehabilitating houses in Mississippi, helping people who were affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The group leaves tomorrow under the guidance of Carol Parreco, coordinator of service learning for the college.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER | June 25, 2006
Libraries start summer reading Preschoolers through 12th-graders are invited to join the summer reading program at the Anne Arundel County Public Library. The theme is "Clue Into Reading," and the program runs through July 29. All 15 branches are participating. Those who join the club will receive a themed game board with activities, riddles, jokes and special offers from area businesses. Club members can go to the library weekly and earn prizes by completing "reading adventures." Older children can join the "Say What?"
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
While other students are relaxing during Howard Community College's winter break, 19-year-old Amber Gillette of Laurel is planning to do hard labor, knocking down walls and tearing up floors for free. "I'm looking forward to that," she said. Gillette is one of 10 HCC students who have decided to spend their break rehabilitating houses in Mississippi to help people who were affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The group leaves tomorrow under the guidance of Carol Parreco, coordinator of service learning for the college.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
SO IN THE end only 49 of the state's 45,000 high school seniors were denied diplomas this spring for failing to complete 75 hours of "service learning."To whom the credit? Educators would give it to the thousands of students and teachers who took seriously the state's pioneering attempt to make community service a graduation requirement.Cynics would say "infusion" came to the rescue.The latest buzzword in Maryland education, infusion allows students to complete the community service requirement with in-class work, often writing letters in the cause of citizenship and voluntarism.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
On Kristopher Buckler's first day with Reggie, he repeatedly instructs the 9-month-old golden retriever to rest - one of several basic commands the playful puppy will have to master during months of guide-dog training. Until Reggie is 18 months old, it will be Buckler's duty to familiarize him with different environments, such as the Wal-Mart that they would visit later that evening to get the puppy accustomed to crowds and automatic doors. With help from his family, Buckler will teach Reggie proper behavior and basic commands, preparing the dog for additional training with a professional guide dog instructor.
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