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February 20, 2013
A Wounded Warrior and employee with the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) here recently got a new best friend, courtesy of Hero Dogs, a Maryland charity that provides service dogs to injured or disabled veterans. Kelly Keck, an equal employment opportunity specialist in ATEC's EEO Office, and Lady Liberty recently met when representatives from the charity introduced him to the 3-year-old golden retriever, called "Libby" for short. Keck and Libby are still in training but warmed to each other enough to begin spending 24 hours a day in each other's company, organizers said.
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NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
The living room of John and Michelle Barbare's townhouse in Ellicott City is filled by a crib, baby clothes and toys that belong to Cameron, their 1-month-old son. In the midst of these things lies Javier, the family's dog. It's a comforting environment, far from the places John Barbare used to call home. The 34-year-old Army veteran spent years in war-torn areas of the Middle East. Barbare, who joined the army when he was 17 and graduated from the Citadel in the early 2000s, served during the initial buildup of the Iraqi war in 2003-2004.
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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
He had been at the Iraqi front for months — and before that, in the war zones of Kuwait, Somalia and Bosnia — so for Sgt. 1st Class Mark Gwathmey, the day-to-day presence of shelling and explosions seemed like no big deal. Sure, there were headaches from an old head injury, and a few hand tremors, and some pain from a past broken foot. "[It] was nothing I wasn't ready to deal with," Gwathmey says. "I'm a Marine. " Then he got home. Back in Maryland in 2006, Gwathmey saw his shakes worsening.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
As Monarch Academy music teacher Kenzie Turk talked about the trials of living with Type 1 diabetes, her service dog, Bear, lay nearby, drifting in and out of a deep sleep. Dozing in class isn't usually acceptable at the public charter school in Glen Burnie, but the 8-month-old black Labrador retriever had endured a busy night, waking Turk more than two dozen times to alert her that complications from the chronic disease had flared again, prompting her to take action before something went tragically wrong.
EXPLORE
By Sarah Pastrana | August 27, 2012
When Debbie Catena wakes up at 6:25 a.m., it's not the beep of an alarm clock that gets her attention, but a nudge and a sniff from her golden retriever, Jacob. A childhood illness left Catena with 60 percent hearing loss in her right ear and completely deaf in her left ear. Jacob is a hearing dog that was paired with Catena, a 55-year-old Ellicott City resident, through Fidos for Freedom, a nonprofit organization based in Laurel that provides service dogs, hearing dogs and therapy dogs to residents of the Baltimore-Washington area.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
As Monarch Academy music teacher Kenzie Turk talked about the trials of living with Type 1 diabetes, her service dog, Bear, lay nearby, drifting in and out of a deep sleep. Dozing in class isn't usually acceptable at the public charter school in Glen Burnie, but the 8-month-old black Labrador retriever had endured a busy night, waking Turk more than two dozen times to alert her that complications from the chronic disease had flared again, prompting her to take action before something went tragically wrong.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Hazel Sanders depends on her Rottweiler, Jurnee, to get her out walking, which she needs for a disabling knee condition, and to help her up if she falls. Two doctors have written letters saying the dog is an important part of her treatment, and she considers it as much a help as a seeing-eye dog is for a blind person. "It's not a pet; she's my legs," said Sanders, who is 70 and lives in Laurel. "I depend on the dog. ... She keeps me going. " Now, though, the 69-pound dog could stand between Sanders and a new home.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Hazel Sanders and her Rottweiler service dog, Jurnee, are preparing to move into an apartment she can afford after the management company agreed to drop objections based on the Maryland Court of Appeals decision earlier this year defining pit bulls as inherently dangerous animals. Sanders reached agreement in mediation last week through the Howard County Office of Human Rights, where she had filed a complaint against Equity Management II for refusing to make an exception to its no-pets policy for a service dog, as federal law requires.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 20, 1997
Erinn Elizabeth Farver knows it is time to move out on her own. But for an epileptic who suffers from unpredictable seizures, sometimes feels the woozy effects of 26 pills a day and does not drive, such a move goes beyond finding a place and paying the bills.It is a change that worries her parents, Beverly and Robert Farver of Eldersburg, who sometimes hesitate to even let their 26-year-old daughter go downstairs. Without knowing when a seizure will occur, they worry about her safety -- yet understand her need for independence.
EXPLORE
May 2, 2012
Our Savior Lutheran Church, 13611 Laurel Bowie Road, will present "A Little Night Music," a mini concert of handbells, strings, men's quartet and vocalists, on Sunday, May 6 at 7 p.m. A free-will offering will be taken to support the pastors' discretionary fund and to help obtain a diabetic service dog for a public school music teacher. For information, call 301-776-7670.
EXPLORE
February 20, 2013
A Wounded Warrior and employee with the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) here recently got a new best friend, courtesy of Hero Dogs, a Maryland charity that provides service dogs to injured or disabled veterans. Kelly Keck, an equal employment opportunity specialist in ATEC's EEO Office, and Lady Liberty recently met when representatives from the charity introduced him to the 3-year-old golden retriever, called "Libby" for short. Keck and Libby are still in training but warmed to each other enough to begin spending 24 hours a day in each other's company, organizers said.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez | January 17, 2013
Meet Zoltan. He doesn't know it yet, but he's about to be famous (well, more famous than right now, anyway). Zoltan is an 11-month old Labrador-Golden Retriever mix who's being raised to be a service dog by Baltimore's JoAnn Rogers and her family. And on Monday, he'll lead the 2013 Presidential Inaugural Parade (we knew him when!). "Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) was chosen from more than 2,800 applicants to march in the parade," says Rogers, who has raised Zoltan since he was eight weeks old. He'll stay with the family until November, when he'll be returned to CCI to finish his training and go live with someone who needs him for assistance.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Hazel Sanders and her Rottweiler service dog, Jurnee, are preparing to move into an apartment she can afford after the management company agreed to drop objections based on the Maryland Court of Appeals decision earlier this year defining pit bulls as inherently dangerous animals. Sanders reached agreement in mediation last week through the Howard County Office of Human Rights, where she had filed a complaint against Equity Management II for refusing to make an exception to its no-pets policy for a service dog, as federal law requires.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
WEATHER: Sunny, with a high near 56 . Tonight is expected to be mostly clear, low around 42. TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. Parts of North Charles Street remain closed due to water main repairs . TOP NEWS Caesars expands gambling plans after Question 7 passes : Caesars Entertainment announced its plans to spend $25 million more on a planned Baltimore casino and hire 500 additional people following the passage of Question 7. Two men accused in area abductions, rapes and robberies : City and county police have charged two men in connection with a string of incidents in which they allegedly abducted their victims, robbing some and sexually assaulting others.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Hazel Sanders depends on her Rottweiler, Jurnee, to get her out walking, which she needs for a disabling knee condition, and to help her up if she falls. Two doctors have written letters saying the dog is an important part of her treatment, and she considers it as much a help as a seeing-eye dog is for a blind person. "It's not a pet; she's my legs," said Sanders, who is 70 and lives in Laurel. "I depend on the dog. ... She keeps me going. " Now, though, the 69-pound dog could stand between Sanders and a new home.
EXPLORE
By Sarah Pastrana | August 27, 2012
When Debbie Catena wakes up at 6:25 a.m., it's not the beep of an alarm clock that gets her attention, but a nudge and a sniff from her golden retriever, Jacob. A childhood illness left Catena with 60 percent hearing loss in her right ear and completely deaf in her left ear. Jacob is a hearing dog that was paired with Catena, a 55-year-old Ellicott City resident, through Fidos for Freedom, a nonprofit organization based in Laurel that provides service dogs, hearing dogs and therapy dogs to residents of the Baltimore-Washington area.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
November 24, 1993
The Americans with Disabilities Act took effect nearly two years ago. It required that stores, restaurants, hotels, and recreation facilities, among other businesses, make "reasonable" modifications to provide access for disabled customers.But this is what it did not do: It didn't instantly educate the public about the barriers confronting the handicapped, nor did it wave a wand of sensitivity over America.Thus, it is not enough for someone like Roberta Stein of Virginia, who has multiple sclerosis and uses a service dog for assistance, to hand a copy of the law to the owner of Bullock's Airport Inn restaurant in Westminster and expect that will straighten out everything.
EXPLORE
May 2, 2012
Our Savior Lutheran Church, 13611 Laurel Bowie Road, will present "A Little Night Music," a mini concert of handbells, strings, men's quartet and vocalists, on Sunday, May 6 at 7 p.m. A free-will offering will be taken to support the pastors' discretionary fund and to help obtain a diabetic service dog for a public school music teacher. For information, call 301-776-7670.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
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