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BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1994
Seven of the state's biggest black businesses slipped downward, two rose and one new Maryland entrant appeared yesterday as Black Enterprise magazine published its listings of the country's top black-owned establishments based on 1993 sales.In what the magazine called "one of the best years ever" for top black-owned companies, Stop Shop and Save supermarkets, of Baltimore, the state's highest-ranked black-owned company, with sales of $64.02 million in 1993, slipped from No. 16 in the 1992 sales rankings to No. 21 for 1993 on the magazine's list of the top 100 industrial and service companies.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Sodexo Inc. plans to lay off 190 workers in May at its operations at Loyola University Maryland, the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said Thursday. The Gaithersburg-based company told regulators that the school at 4501 N. Charles St., Baltimore, will no longer be using Sodexo's food services, causing the company to close its facility there and lay off workers on May 31. "Sodexo has enjoyed a long and successful relationship with Loyola University Maryland and unfortunately they've decided to go in a different direction with their campus dining program," said spokesman Enrico Dinges in an email.
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BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court took no action yesterday on the high-stakes legal conflict over the future of local telephone service, raising the prospect that the dispute could soon wind up back in Congress' hands.Yesterday was the last day that the court was likely to accept cases for the term that ends in July, and the justices had said they would study eight separate appeals on the telephone matter at yesterday's private session.They did so, but then issued orders that did not include a review of the telephone dispute.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A bill introduced in the Maryland Senate Thursday would create a commission to look into regulating payroll service companies in the wake of allegations of fraud at AccuPay of Bel Air. Sen. Barry Glassman, a Harford County Republican, introduced the bill on the Senate floor, prompted, he said, by hundreds of calls from concerned small-business owners. AccuPay is under investigation for allegedly not sending clients' tax payments to tax collectors. "AccuPay of Bel Air recently filed bankruptcy, leaving hundreds of small businesses with delayed payroll and delinquent or missed tax payments to the state and federal government," Glassman said in announcing the bill.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | April 11, 1995
Integrated Health Services Inc. yesterday continued its drive into businesses that supplement its chain of subacute-care facilities, announcing it will spend $29 million to buy a Florida rehabilitation services company.The definitive agreement to buy IntegraCare Inc. is part of Owings Mills-based IHS' move to contain costs by taking control of companies that provide services Integrated uses in its facilities. Subacute-care centers are designed to capture business by serving patients who are too sick to stay at home but who don't need the full range of services found in a more expensive acute-care hospital.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
A survey of chief financial officers in the Baltimore area has found additional evidence of economic improvement, but also reveals lingering warning signs that the recovery remains fragile.In the first of what he expects to be semiannual surveys of at least 700 area businesses, University of Baltimore economist Michael A. Conte found the local economic landscape was a bumpy patchwork: valleys of gloom next to peaks of optimism."There is clear evidence of a turnaround," Mr. Conte said of his TC survey released yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Attorneys Per Diem Inc., a 5-year-old Baltimore company that places more than 100 temporary lawyers, paralegals and secretaries in jobs throughout Maryland and Washington each day, was purchased yesterday by Jacksonville, Fla.-based AccuStaff Inc. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.President Derek Dewan said his Florida temporary services company wants to be the first major temporary agency to enter the growing legal market. AccuStaff also bought Lawstaf Inc., an Atlanta-based legal temporary service, yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The IRS has long suspected that lots o service businesses -- cabbies, electricians, plumbers -- are hiding income from the government. But it has never had the resources to prove it.Now the Clinton administration, ever in search of revenue, has hit on a way to find out: Deputize every company in America to track the money down.Getting businesses to inform on their peers to help the IRS find tax cheats is the aim of an obscure provision in the budget package that the House passed and the Senate will take up this week.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 3, 2013
For many years, the officers of the various private volunteer fire and ambulance companies that provide a valuable public service to Harford County have strenuously resisted any financial or strategic oversight by the Harford County government. This is not to say that the volunteer companies are somehow rogue with regard to the very high level of services they provide. The ambulance service is under the strict supervision of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, and the fire side of the volunteer companies is under similar strict training regimens for the people who respond to calls.
BUSINESS
By Patrick Rossello | November 12, 1990
TO HELP SOLVE ENGINEERING problems for small and mid-size companies, The University of Maryland created the Technology Extension Service in 1984. In most cases, the cost of its help is free or close to it.The service, which is attached to the Engineering Research Center, receives approximately $700,000 in support annually from the university. It is part of the university's effort to "stimulate the linkages between the university and the state's business and industrial community by promoting cooperative research projects in engineering, science and computer technology."
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | January 3, 2013
For many years, the officers of the various private volunteer fire and ambulance companies that provide a valuable public service to Harford County have strenuously resisted any financial or strategic oversight by the Harford County government. This is not to say that the volunteer companies are somehow rogue with regard to the very high level of services they provide. The ambulance service is under the strict supervision of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, and the fire side of the volunteer companies is under similar strict training regimens for the people who respond to calls.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
A CSX Corp. coal pier in Baltimore is out of service for the foreseeable future as the railroad assesses the "substantial" damage caused by a ship that hit the structure. The Bayside Coal Pier, on Benhill Avenue in Curtis Bay, was struck Saturday by a tanker headed for a dock up the channel — an unusual accident that could cause ripple effects for coal shipping. CSX said an employee was injured in the incident, hospitalized and later released. The Jacksonville, Fla.-based company estimates in a federal lawsuit that the Wawasan Ruby, owned by Panama-based Trio Happiness S.A., caused more than $5 million in damage, both to the property and in revenue loss.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
FTI Consulting Inc.'s stock price hit a 12-month low Wednesday after the business services company fell short of financial analysts' expectations for first-quarter earnings. The company, which has its corporate headquarters in Baltimore, said it earned 43 cents per share in the three months ending in March. That was up slightly from 42 cents per share a year earlier but 18 cents a share short of what analysts had anticipated. The company attributed the gap to a range of factors, including "expenses and investments that should not recur in 2012.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 16, 2007
Joseph B. Williams, former aide to three Baltimore County public schools superintendents and a founder of Alternatives Unlimited, a national educational services company, died of complications from diabetes at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Pikesville resident was 72. Born in Gettysburg, Pa., Mr. Williams moved to Baltimore, where he attended Douglass High School. He earned his General Educational Development certificate while serving in the Army Transportation Corps from 1957 to 1959.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
Maryland regulators announced yesterday that they suspended the license of CashPoint Network Services Inc., a New York-based payment service being forced into bankruptcy by creditors and facing suspensions by other states. CashPoint, which transmits consumers' payments to utilities and other companies, operates nine locations in check-cashing and convenience stores in Maryland, including sites in Frederick, Cumberland and several Washington suburbs. In an annual report submitted to Maryland regulators, the privately held company said it had transmitted $1.7 billion in payments through 18.5 million transactions nationwide in 2002.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
Timmy Lloyd pays AT&T Wireless about $53 for 500 minutes of calls a month. But even at that bargain rate, the 34-year-old Inner Harbor maintenance worker says it's not worth it. Lloyd can barely hear the people he calls. He has forked over $25 on three separate occasions to replace a faulty chip in his handset. And he spends most of his minutes calling the customer-service line to find help for his other troubles. "I'm giving up on them," said Lloyd, who uses his cell phone to call home to Norfolk every day. "They should get back to people more quickly about their problems.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | May 6, 1992
Companies that offer health-care services and products more cheaply than hospitals are the fastest-growing segment of the health-care market, analysts say.Encouraged by employers and insurance companies eager to cut costs, those companies also are responsible for increasingly specialized alternatives to hospitals.An estimated 100 health-care companies went public last year in the competition to provide lower-cost care, said William L. Paternotte, managing director of research for Alex. Brown & Sons, which devotes 20 percent of its analysts to the burgeoning field.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
A bill introduced in the Maryland Senate Thursday would create a commission to look into regulating payroll service companies in the wake of allegations of fraud at AccuPay of Bel Air. Sen. Barry Glassman, a Harford County Republican, introduced the bill on the Senate floor, prompted, he said, by hundreds of calls from concerned small-business owners. AccuPay is under investigation for allegedly not sending clients' tax payments to tax collectors. "AccuPay of Bel Air recently filed bankruptcy, leaving hundreds of small businesses with delayed payroll and delinquent or missed tax payments to the state and federal government," Glassman said in announcing the bill.
BUSINESS
By Jan Norman and Jan Norman,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | October 28, 2002
The common perception of eBay, the extensive online auction site, is of Aunt Tillie selling her collection of 1950s-era Avon bottles and Cousin Jose browsing for a bargain on a laptop computer. More than 5,000 such folks attended eBay Inc.'s convention in June in Anaheim, Calif. But in the past year, major companies such as International Business Machines Corp. and Sears, Roebuck and Co. have become eBay devotees, too. eBay now expects its growth to be propelled not by individual users, but rather by big corporations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 18, 2002
Watching movies delivered legally through the Internet to your personal computer is an idea who's time may never come, but Hollywood is finally getting serious about it. CinemaNow and Intertainer, two online movie services, are just now providing access to major studio releases, moving beyond their extensive libraries of Grade Z direct-to-video flops. I tried both and found huge technical improvements over my first experience back in January 2001. If you have a fast and reliable Internet connection, such as a cable modem or DSL line, CinemaNow and Intertainer mostly provide video quality that's almost comparable to broadcast television - a huge achievement considering how much compression is required.
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