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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2001
In an early test of the principles laid out in Howard County's new general plan, a developer is proposing senior housing at the intersection of Marriottsville Road and Route 144 that, if approved, could result in the expansion of the county's public sewer and water area. Columbia-based Brantly Development Corp. has applied to build 143 senior housing units on 73 acres at the northeast corner of the Marriottsville juncture - 71 of them single-family detached homes and 72 attached homes with four units per building.
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NEWS
By Deborah Flateman | September 25, 2013
With kids back in school and Labor Day parades and beach parties concluded, it's time to talk about a perennial issue facing our communities: "food insecurity," or more simply put, hunger. With nearly 50 million Americans going without enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs, food insecurity is one of our gravest ills, at the center of dangerous gaps in public safety, public health, education and the economy. In Maryland, the richest state in the nation, 780,000 people don't know where their next meal is coming from, including a quarter of a million children.
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BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 13, 2006
Are you getting your money's worth from caller ID? Some callers can't be identified because their information is blocked or unavailable, but in other cases the callers aren't named because the customer's phone company simply doesn't want to spend the money to obtain the data. A small Boston Globe test of caller ID accuracy found several instances in which Verizon Communications and Comcast Corp. didn't provide a caller's name because they didn't want to pay the extra money. The price is minimal on a per-call basis - often a penny or less a call - but spread across a telecommunications giant's many customers, it can quickly run into the tens of millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
The cause of days-long power outages in Southeast Baltimore earlier this summer and the work by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to prevent future problems will be discussed at a public meeting hosted by BGE officials in Fells Point on Monday, according to the company. In the middle of July, residents in Canton, Fells Point and other neighborhoods endured days without power at a time when the heat index was often approaching 110 degrees. Amid efforts to restore power, BGE officials acknowledged that the rapid growth of the neighborhoods has outpaced improvements to the electrical grid.
NEWS
March 10, 1994
POLICE LOG* Owen Brown: 8800 block of Stanford Blvd.: A mechanic at Apple Ford discovered a dark green 1993 Ford Tempo stolen from the service area Friday. Police said he had parked the car and gone to get a part, but the car was gone when he returned. The vehicle had Maryland tags AXM080.
NEWS
April 9, 2000
A late afternoon storm with gusting winds left about 1,200 Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers without power last night. "This is typical damage for a storm of this nature," said Darcel Kimble, a spokeswoman for BGE. Several trees were reported uprooted in southern Baltimore, including one that fell onto an unoccupied car. Kimble said the outages were scattered throughout the service area, however. All service was to be restored by 10 last night.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
During the 1992-93 session, the proposed expansion of the service area of a regional medical waste incinerator in South Baltimore was one of the Baltimore City Council's most hotly contested issues.Yesterday, two months after the council approved the expansion, the issue flared again.This time, the forum for the controversy was the weekly meeting of the city's Board of Estimates.The board voted 4-1 to approve an agreement between the city and Medical Waste Associates to settle civil litigation stemming from the company's illegal acceptance of out-of-state medical waste for an incinerator located in Hawkins Point, near the Anne Arundel County border.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 7, 2008
Gas crisis or no, millions of Americans are hitting the road this summer, and many will travel that magical stretch of road known as the New Jersey Turnpike, where they'll stop at its various service areas which are, well, not so magical. These are named after great Americans, for some reason, and include the Vince Lombardi Service Area, the Thomas Edison Service Area, the Grover Cleveland Service Area, the Molly Pitcher Service Area and so on. You wonder what someone like Thomas Edison would think about having a rest stop named after him. This was maybe the greatest inventor in history, the man who gave us the electric lightbulb, the phonograph and 1,000 other inventions.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Aberdeen commissioners have approved the sale of $760,000 in bonds to pay for the extension of sewer services to a 500-acre industrial area in the south section of the town.The bonds will be issued through the Farmers Home Administration, and will pay 7 percent. They will be paid back over 40 years by assessments placed on property owners in the new service area, Town Administrator Peter A. Dacey said.The assessment agreement was established with the property owners so town residents will not have to pay for the sewer extension project, Dacey said.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | February 11, 1992
Bell Atlantic Mobile Systems and four other companies plan to band together to look for ways to standardize such things as billing, advertising and network performance for their cellular customers.The five companies -- Bell Atlantic Mobile, Ameritech Mobile Communications, Contel Cellular Inc., GTE Mobilnet and NYNEX Mobile Communications -- agreed to develop a joint strategy for approaching the market that could lead to a national standard for wireless services."This opens up a lot of futuristic doors for us," said Janet Henderson, a spokeswoman for GTE in Atlanta.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
At the behest of business owners - and using their financial contributions - the Waterfront Partnership is extending its safety and cleaning services into the heart of Fells Point. "It's really a great example of a community coming together to better the place that they live, work and play," said Mike Maraziti, president of Fell's Point Main Street Inc., a nonprofit that promotes commerce in the neighborhood. About 30 businesses and a few residents chipped in more than $150,000 to hire the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore Inc. to empty garbage cans, sweep sidewalks and provide safety patrols, said Maraziti, who owns One-Eyed Mike's tavern, near the corner of South Bond and Aliceanna streets.
NEWS
BALTIMORE SUN MEDIA GROUP | February 11, 2013
Bills that would allow a surcharge of up to $2 per month on residential natural gas bills to pay for new pipelines and other distribution system upgrades passed both houses of the Maryland General Assembly last week, as most Harford County legislators gave the bills their support. The exception was in the House of Delegates, where Harford Dels. Glen Glass and Pat McDonough were among 18 votes cast against HB-89, which received 119 yeas, including from Harford Dels. Mary-Dulany James, Susan McComas, Wayne Norman, Donna Stifler and Kathy Szeliga.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Pop tunes blasted from loudspeakers into the cavernous warehouse at the Maryland Food Bank on Thursday, energizing about 300 volunteers filling 15,000 boxes with holiday staples for the needy. "You can get exercise, help those who don't have a meal for the holiday, and then there's the whole camaraderie thing with your co-workers," said Gerri Gardner, the liveliest of the CSX railroad's packing team, which included workers from MTA and MARC trains. This time of year, the bank, which distributes food to about 600 soup kitchens, pantries and shelters across the state from its Halethorpe headquarters, gears up for its own Thanksgiving rush.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 28, 2011
We thought we'd gotten so much tougher about winter, didn't we? No more panicked runs to the supermarket for bread, milk and toilet paper at the first hint of snow. No more jittery conversations around the office about when the storm would hit and when we could make a break for home without drawing too much attention. No longer would we shoot anxious looks at the sky and fixate on weather updates from Bob Turk and the great Tom Tasselmyer. Or spend hours nervously watching news footage of salt trucks hitting the streets or Rob Roblin gleefully jabbing a yardstick into a snowbank to give us accumulation totals.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
A 12-inch water main at Eutaw and Franklin streets broke Friday evening, causing buildings to lose water service and icing streets, according to a spokesman for the Baltimore Department of Public Works. A city contractor was laying a new section of pipe when the break occurred, said Kurt Kocher, the spokesman. As of 10 p.m., between 15 and 20 buildings in the area -- which stretched from just north of Franklin to Park Street on the east, Paca Street on the west and Saratoga Street on the south -- were without water service, and crews had shut down traffic in the area, he said.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
Transportation service available on demand Harford Transit has started a new Demand Response Service for eligible senior citizens, individuals with disabilities and low-income wage earners. The service is available from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays. The fare is $2 (Harford Transit-issued vouchers will be accepted) to take eligible participants wherever they need to go. Reservations must be made by 2 p.m. the working day before travel is planned. The service area includes parts of Aberdeen, Bel Air, Edgewood and Havre de Grace, and areas in between.
NEWS
June 9, 1993
Some of the most intense behind-the-scenes jockeying see in years is going as the City Council prepares to vote Monday on whether to allow the Medical Waste Associates' controversial Hawkins Point incinerator to expand its service area.Owners are making feverish last-minute appeals, saying the facility will go under unless their request is granted. Competitors, smelling blood, are watching the situation like vultures. And none of the adjoining residents either in the city or Anne Arundel County seems to be neutral.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
IT IS CLEAR now that 6th District representatives of the Baltimore City Council didn't know what they were doing when they lobbied earlier this year to expand the service area of a medical waste incineration business. Having fought for the expansion so -- as they put it -- a lot of hospitals wouldn't have to burn their own waste and pollute the air, these same council members now say that doesn't matter. They want Phoenix Services Inc. punished for cutting 15 jobs.Sixth District council members Norman A. Handy, Edward L. Reisinger and Melvin L. Stukes said they were led to believe Phoenix would hire more South Baltimore residents if it was allowed to expand its service area.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 7, 2008
Gas crisis or no, millions of Americans are hitting the road this summer, and many will travel that magical stretch of road known as the New Jersey Turnpike, where they'll stop at its various service areas which are, well, not so magical. These are named after great Americans, for some reason, and include the Vince Lombardi Service Area, the Thomas Edison Service Area, the Grover Cleveland Service Area, the Molly Pitcher Service Area and so on. You wonder what someone like Thomas Edison would think about having a rest stop named after him. This was maybe the greatest inventor in history, the man who gave us the electric lightbulb, the phonograph and 1,000 other inventions.
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