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By Norbert Myslinski | March 16, 1997
IN ONE DAY this month in Baltimore, five people were murdered in five separate incidents. That raised the city's murder rate to 53, compared with 45 at the same time last year. Despite all our efforts, violence continues to escalate.Poverty, drugs, guns and dysfunctional families all have been blamed for violent behavior. In one publication, researchers listed 15 theories on the origins of violence. However, none of them referred to a critical element. Not one made any reference to the brain.
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FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 29, 2011
Holiday parties are just a fancy cover, and traditional family dinners are simply an excuse. The truth is, all we want to do at this time of year is … eat. Winter days are shorter and colder, and the sunlight is weak. So is our will, and nothing fills that hole in the psyche like mom's meatloaf and scalloped potatoes. Or a slab of lasagna the size of a brick. Or a serving of spaghetti that would fill a garbage can lid. Carbs and home cookin' are feel-good foods. They either trigger the release of the feel-good hormone serotonin in the brain or they can bring back memories of happier times, when life was less complicated or sad. That's one explanation anyway.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Ecstasy, a drug popular at all-night dance parties known as "raves," appears to damage brain cells that release a chemical responsible for mood, memory and pain perception, a study has found.RTC Dr. George Ricaurte, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted brain scans on people who had used the illicit drug an average of 200 times over a five-year period. The destruction was greatest among the most frequent users.The drug damaged cells that release serotonin, a natural chemical that is associated with feelings of well-being.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Sex and headache are inextricably linked by the age-old excuse: "Not tonight, dear. I have a headache." But brain science is finding that it's more complicated than that. For many people, sex can turn a dull, throbbing pain into a raging headache. For a few who jump into bed feeling fine, orgasm can trigger a sudden headache. And for a minority of people, headaches are cured by a roll in the hay. Now a small pilot study exploring the link between migraines and libido suggests there might be a reward for headache pain.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 13, 2001
Q. Have you ever heard of sipping beer to stop a migraine? I went to a doctor in a little town in Louisiana, and he asked if I get an aura. Before my head starts to hurt, my vision changes, and I see little blinky lights. The doctor said I should drink a can of beer (not wine or liquor) as soon as I start to see the lights. Over the past 20 years, this remedy has worked almost every time. I thought some other migraine sufferers would like to know. A. Migraine headaches can be horrible, but one advantage of an aura is that it gives the sufferer a bit of warning before the headache strikes with full force.
FEATURES
By Alyssa Gabbay | August 6, 1991
With the precise causes of migraine headaches still unclear, doctors aren't entirely sure how sumatriptan, manufactured by Glaxo Inc., a pharmaceutical company near Raleigh, N.C., works. But they think it corrects an imbalance of a messenger chemical in the brain called serotonin.When the equilibrium of serotonin in the brain is disturbed, a chain of events is triggered which causes migraine pain, according to Dr. Howard Weiss, a Baltimore neurologist in private practice who specializes in headaches.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | December 14, 2004
One in every 10 people with major depression may carry a particular variant of a gene that makes it difficult to respond to most common antidepressant medicines, according to a new study. Marc Caron and his colleagues at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy have identified this so-called gene variant in nine of 87 patients studied. All but two of the nine failed to get better on antidepressants. The remaining two patients benefited only at the highest dose, according to Caron, a researcher in the department of cell biology.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
Sex and headache are inextricably linked by the age-old excuse: "Not tonight, dear. I have a headache." But brain science is finding that it's more complicated than that. For many people, sex can turn a dull, throbbing pain into a raging headache. For a few who jump into bed feeling fine, orgasm can trigger a sudden headache. And for a minority of people, headaches are cured by a roll in the hay. Now a small pilot study exploring the link between migraines and libido suggests there might be a reward for headache pain.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2001
Q. I am a 57-year-old woman who has had a lifetime fight with depression. I function quite well, but life can be difficult. Approximately eight years ago I began using Prozac. It was like a miracle. Within six weeks the depression was gone. For the past few years, however, the drug has been less effective. The depression isn't nearly as bad as before, but it's mild to moderate. My doctor prescribed Wellbutrin, but a month after discontinuing Prozac I was in a black depression and was desperate.
FEATURES
By Natalie Angier and Natalie Angier,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1996
They are the type of people who own a one-sided bed: the wrong side. They're often anxious, grumpy and self-pitying, viewing the past with regret, the present with suspicion and the future with dread. The traditional tag for them is neurotic, but a better word is kvetch.Now it seems that people who are prone to anxiety and pessimism may have drawn a short stick, genetically speaking. Scientists have discovered a modest but measurable link between anxiety-related behavior and the gene that controls the brain's ability to use serotonin, an essential neurochemical.
NEWS
By SUSANNE RUST and SUSANNE RUST,MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL | March 31, 2006
An international team of researchers has identified a specific receptor in the brain that, if faulty, may be involved in sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS. The team, led by physiologist Andrew Tryba at the Medical College of Wisconsin, adds critical information to a growing body of research that shows serotonin receptors may be involved in an infant's ability to gasp - and therefore breathe - in low-oxygen conditions. This gasping mechanism is thought to fail in SIDS victims. SIDS is the No. 1 killer of 1-month to 1-year-old children in the United States, Tryba said.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | December 14, 2004
One in every 10 people with major depression may carry a particular variant of a gene that makes it difficult to respond to most common antidepressant medicines, according to a new study. Marc Caron and his colleagues at the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy have identified this so-called gene variant in nine of 87 patients studied. All but two of the nine failed to get better on antidepressants. The remaining two patients benefited only at the highest dose, according to Caron, a researcher in the department of cell biology.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2004
By any measure, July Flowers is deeply depressed. She feels sad all the time and is prone to crying jags and fits of rage. When she gets home from work, she sometimes goes straight to bed, leaving her two daughters, who are 11 and 5, to make dinner for themselves. "I just want to sleep and ignore it all," Flowers said. "I don't want to deal with anything." Until two months ago, Flowers, a 33-year-old computer specialist in Warner Robbins, Ga., was taking the anti-depressant Effexor, which kept her symptoms at bay. Then she found out she was pregnant.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 13, 2001
Q. Have you ever heard of sipping beer to stop a migraine? I went to a doctor in a little town in Louisiana, and he asked if I get an aura. Before my head starts to hurt, my vision changes, and I see little blinky lights. The doctor said I should drink a can of beer (not wine or liquor) as soon as I start to see the lights. Over the past 20 years, this remedy has worked almost every time. I thought some other migraine sufferers would like to know. A. Migraine headaches can be horrible, but one advantage of an aura is that it gives the sufferer a bit of warning before the headache strikes with full force.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2001
Q. I am a 57-year-old woman who has had a lifetime fight with depression. I function quite well, but life can be difficult. Approximately eight years ago I began using Prozac. It was like a miracle. Within six weeks the depression was gone. For the past few years, however, the drug has been less effective. The depression isn't nearly as bad as before, but it's mild to moderate. My doctor prescribed Wellbutrin, but a month after discontinuing Prozac I was in a black depression and was desperate.
NEWS
By Barry McCaffrey | June 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- "Ecstasy" --- a stimulant that can cause brain damage -- is skyrocketing in popularity. Ecstasy has the properties of amphetamines along with psychedelic effects that make users feel peaceful. Different recipes are used for ecstasy, all of which can produce serious harm. The scientific name of the substance is long and cumbersome; its acronym is MDMA. The drug is synthetic, meaning it isn't found in nature. Ecstasy is sometimes called "Adam," "X," "X-TC," "Stacy," "Clarity," "Essence," "Lover's Speed," "Eve," or "e."
NEWS
By States News Service | November 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- For the first time, the Food and Dru Administration has cleared the way for research on the ways a hallucinogenic drug known as Ecstasy affects humans.Dr. Charles Grob, a psychiatrist at the University of California's Irvine Medical Center, this month won FDA approval for his study, expected to take place in two months. In the study, six subjects will take low-level doses of the drug and a placebo in an attempt to determine how much of the drug is needed to !B produce noticeable effects.
NEWS
December 11, 1997
Young friendship will cost GlendeningThe Dec. 3 article, "Young using Senate office to boost personal business," is a surprising wake-up call for the citizens of Maryland.To have Maryland's top lawmakers immediately turn this matter over to the Joint Legislative Ethics Committee and to the state prosecutor's office for a thorough investigation is very reassuring for all of us.Gov. Parris Glendening cannot let his friendship for Sen. Larry Young interfere with his sworn responsibilities as our chief executive.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Ecstasy, a drug popular at all-night dance parties known as "raves," appears to damage brain cells that release a chemical responsible for mood, memory and pain perception, a study has found.RTC Dr. George Ricaurte, a neurologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted brain scans on people who had used the illicit drug an average of 200 times over a five-year period. The destruction was greatest among the most frequent users.The drug damaged cells that release serotonin, a natural chemical that is associated with feelings of well-being.
NEWS
December 11, 1997
Young friendship will cost GlendeningThe Dec. 3 article, "Young using Senate office to boost personal business," is a surprising wake-up call for the citizens of Maryland.To have Maryland's top lawmakers immediately turn this matter over to the Joint Legislative Ethics Committee and to the state prosecutor's office for a thorough investigation is very reassuring for all of us.Gov. Parris Glendening cannot let his friendship for Sen. Larry Young interfere with his sworn responsibilities as our chief executive.
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