Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSeries Ee
IN THE NEWS

Series Ee

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | April 3, 1995
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Treasury just announced a new interest-rate structure for Series EE savings bonds. The new yields will be better for buyers who will hold their bonds less than five years. For longer-term holders, it all depends. You could earn a bit less than the older bonds paid, depending on how interest rates do.The change takes effect May 1. Starting then, the rates on all newly issued EE bonds will be linked to market rates. EE bonds held for less than five years will earn 85 percent of the average six-month Treasury bill yield.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 2, 2012
The new rates for U.S. Savings Bonds are out. And at least the Series I bonds offer a better rate than you get at the bank. Series I bonds purchased this month through the end of April will earn an annualized 1.76 percent for the first six months. Series I bonds are inflation protected. The bond has two rates: a fixed rate for the life of the 30-year-bond and an adjustable rate that goes up and down with inflation every six months. New I bonds carry a zero percent fixed rate, and a 1.76 percent annual rate tied to inflation.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | December 9, 2001
Under the tree at Christmas this year, Americans may find an old gift, wrapped up in new paper, courtesy of their Uncle Sam. The Series EE U.S. Savings Bond, which has been a staple among gift-givers for more than 20 years, will get a new name: the Patriot Bond. And government officials plan to make the bond available just in time for the holidays. The U.S. Treasury is making the change in response to Congress, which wants the government to resurrect the World War II-era War Bond campaign to help fight terrorism.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 1, 2004
TIME IS RUNNING out for HH savings bonds and investors who may want them. At the end of this month, the federal government will stop issuing new HH bonds, which were introduced 24 years ago. The HH bond was never as popular as its siblings - Series EE and I bonds - which was part of the problem. Investors have more than $205 billion tied up in all types of savings bonds, but only $14.2 billion of that, or about 7 percent, is held in HH bonds. With low demand for HH bonds, the Treasury Department concluded they weren't worth the administrative expense.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | January 21, 2001
I'm the holder of some Series E and Series EE savings bonds, and I'd like to confirm some information with you ... concerning the interest-earning periods on E and EE bonds. I have received some conflicting information. This issue pops up all the time. And I'll bet part of the reason is that bonds can be confusing: There are different rules for different types of bonds. Fortunately, the answer to your question is fairly straightforward. Here it is, updated for the new year. And it includes some points from Daniel J. Pederson, author of "Savings Bonds: When to Hold, When to Fold, and Everything In-Between" (Sage Creek Press; 276 pages; $19.95)
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
Savings bonds will never generate the big returns that are possible with stocks. But thanks to some new rules enacted last year, savings bonds may be a bit more alluring to super-conservative investors who want to shield some of their money from the gyrations that stocks sometimes experience.With the changes, the government is "trying to pump some excitement" back into savings bonds, said Daniel J. Pederson, head of Savings Bond Informer Inc., a Detroit-based investment advisory firm."The changes are good as far as they go," said Pederson, who has published a book, "U.S.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1995
The Baltimore Sun will make U.S. Savings Bond redemption tables available through the mail. If you'd like to receive the January redemption tables for Series E, Series EE and Freedom Shares, please call Ed Hewitt, The Sun's reader reprentative, at (410) 332-6495 or (800) 829-8000, ext. 6495. Leave your name, address, zip code and telephone number.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | June 2, 2002
I have a lot of Series E bonds coming due. Could you please tell me if I can transfer them, as I don't want to cash them in right now. Yes, said John J. Foley, spokesman for the Bureau of the Public Debt, which runs the nation's savings bond program. You can exchange or swap your Series E and/or Series EE bonds for Series HH bonds. In effect, you can "roll over" or "convert" these bonds to Series HH bonds. As a result, you'll postpone - for up to 20 years - the federal income tax that would usually be due on the bonds you exchange, Foley said.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1991
At year end, The Evening Sun publishes the redemption value of U.S. savings notes and bonds.Savings notes, also known as "Freedom Shares," were issued during the Johnson administration. Series EE bonds replaced Series E bonds in 1980.Since 1982, the interest rate has been linked to rates paid on other government securities. Held five years or longer, EE bonds earn 85 percent of the average return on five-year Treasury securities during the period.The fluctuating rate is set twice a year, in November and May. The current rate is 6.38 percent, which is good until April 30. The prior six-month period it was 6.57 percent.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 2002
There's good news and bad news for people who like to buy U.S. savings bonds. The good news is that the government increased the interest rate for the Series I bond, a type intended to offer bondholders some protection from inflation. As a result, if you buy a Series I bond now through April, it'll earn interest at an annualized rate of 4.08 percent. That's up from 2.57 percent for I bonds purchased from May through October. "In a tight, conservative, low-interest-rate environment, that's a pretty big jump," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of BondHelp.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 2002
There's good news and bad news for people who like to buy U.S. savings bonds. The good news is that the government increased the interest rate for the Series I bond, a type intended to offer bondholders some protection from inflation. As a result, if you buy a Series I bond now through April, it'll earn interest at an annualized rate of 4.08 percent. That's up from 2.57 percent for I bonds purchased from May through October. "In a tight, conservative, low-interest-rate environment, that's a pretty big jump," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of BondHelp.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | June 2, 2002
I have a lot of Series E bonds coming due. Could you please tell me if I can transfer them, as I don't want to cash them in right now. Yes, said John J. Foley, spokesman for the Bureau of the Public Debt, which runs the nation's savings bond program. You can exchange or swap your Series E and/or Series EE bonds for Series HH bonds. In effect, you can "roll over" or "convert" these bonds to Series HH bonds. As a result, you'll postpone - for up to 20 years - the federal income tax that would usually be due on the bonds you exchange, Foley said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
Last year around this time, U.S. savings bonds were boasting robust interest rates that made them even more attractive as holiday gifts. The Series EE bonds offered a 5.54 percent yield, and I bonds - with a rate tied to the annual rate of inflation - were competing with certificates of deposit at 6.49 percent. What a difference a year of falling interest rates makes. The EE bond's yield is now 4.07 percent, and the I bond is at 4.40 percent. Still, the U.S. savings bond program continues to experience modest growth, thanks mostly to the introduction of the I bond three years ago. Another new wrinkle came two weeks ago, when the Treasury Department tapped the swell of patriotism after Sept.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | December 9, 2001
Under the tree at Christmas this year, Americans may find an old gift, wrapped up in new paper, courtesy of their Uncle Sam. The Series EE U.S. Savings Bond, which has been a staple among gift-givers for more than 20 years, will get a new name: the Patriot Bond. And government officials plan to make the bond available just in time for the holidays. The U.S. Treasury is making the change in response to Congress, which wants the government to resurrect the World War II-era War Bond campaign to help fight terrorism.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | January 21, 2001
I'm the holder of some Series E and Series EE savings bonds, and I'd like to confirm some information with you ... concerning the interest-earning periods on E and EE bonds. I have received some conflicting information. This issue pops up all the time. And I'll bet part of the reason is that bonds can be confusing: There are different rules for different types of bonds. Fortunately, the answer to your question is fairly straightforward. Here it is, updated for the new year. And it includes some points from Daniel J. Pederson, author of "Savings Bonds: When to Hold, When to Fold, and Everything In-Between" (Sage Creek Press; 276 pages; $19.95)
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | April 30, 2000
I have questions on E bonds. To add the name of a co-owner, is it the same as for an EE bond? And where do you go to make this correction? And does it apply only to spouses? What about to a grandmother and granddaughter? To change the way a Series E U.S. Savings Bond is registered -- in other words, to add someone else's name as a co-owner or beneficiary -- use Form PD F 4000. You can get a copy from your local bank or by writing: Bureau of the Public Debt, Savings Bond Operations Office, Parkersburg, W.Va.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1990
U.S. savings bonds have long been a popular way to save money, particularly because many employers allow them to be purchased through payroll deductions.Use of savings bonds as a way to pay for college education has also been encouraged by a law that allows eligible bondholders to exempt the interest of recent Series EE bonds from federal taxes.As a service to readers, The Evening Sun at year-end publishes the redemption value of all U.S. savings notes and bonds.Savings notes, also known as "Freedom Shares," were issued during a four-year period starting in the Johnson administration.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
Savings bonds these days don't generate the same excitement of, say, Internet stocks, but the new inflation-proof bonds are attracting more attention. Introduced in September 1998, the inflation-indexed savings bonds, or Series I Bonds, guarantee a rate of return above inflation. New I bonds are paying a rate of 6.98 percent, better than most money market accounts and certificates of deposit. "It's a good return for a government security," said Tony Ristaino, a certified financial planner in Towson.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | September 26, 1999
I'm interested in knowing when it is best to cash in savings bonds. I know if a bond is issued in January, then the best day to cash it in would be January or July. Well, is it the first day of that month, or do you need to wait for the issue date?-- P. M., Hope, R.I."The rule of thumb is, if you're going to cash in a bond, cash it in early in the month. If you're going to buy a bond, buy it later in the month," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of the Savings Bond Informer, a Detroit company that calculates bond values and sells other services to bondholders.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.