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By Stephen Hunter | March 18, 1994
"Serial Mom," John Waters' new film, will have its world premiere at the Senator Theatre at 8 p.m. April 5 as a benefit for AIDS Action Baltimore.Besides Waters, Kathleen Turner, Ricki Lake, Patricia Hearst, Mink Stole and Traci Lords will attend the premiere and a gala party to be held afterward at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The movie, which was shot entirely in Northeast Baltimore and Towson, features Turner as a suburban mom with a secret identity as a serial killer. It is rated R.Tickets are $75 and will become available on a waiting-list basis after March 25. Call (410)
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
You might wonder what kind of relationship the creator of "Serial Mom" would have with his own mom. It turns out John Waters shared an exceptionally close bond with his mother, Patricia Waters , who died Saturday at age 89. Waters told me in the fall that he and his mother had been going on Sunday adventures in Baltimore, revisiting places that were meaningful to the filmmaker, who had grown up in Lutherville and moved to the city as...
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By Stephen Hunter, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 1994
Remember her? How could you forget her? She dominated your life like a Colossus of Toads. She was ... AIYYYYYEEEEEEEEE! ... Mom. Not your mom or my mom, but the mom we measured our moms against and by whose standards we found ours wanting. She was the '50s myth of Mom, the Meta-mom, the Robo-Mom who got up and put on her freshly pressed dress, stockings and heels and went cheerily down to the kitchen at the crack of dawn to fix bacon 'n' eggs for the family, her eyes glittery as Home Shopping Network diamonds, her smile like a crack in a nuclear reactor leaking incandescence into the atmosphere.
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By Stephen Janis and Special to b | June 24, 2011
BEST CELEBRITY: John Waters Before "The Wire" made Baltimore the cultural proxy for dysfunctional locales, John Waters' sense of the absurd put our often-incorrigible and provincially original burg on the map with movies such as "Hairspray," "Polyester" and "Serial Mom. " Waters' ability to capture what’s unique about Baltimore is likely the reason he got the nod from b readers as the Ultimate Baltimore celebrity. After all, Waters' quick-witted persona and equal-opportunity satire have provided just what this dystopian paradise needs on occasion -- a good, self-effacing laugh.
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By Jean Marbella | April 5, 1994
It's another sellout!No, not the Orioles game at Camden Yards, but that other Baltimore scene-making opportunity, the world premiere of a John Waters movie at the Senator Theatre. The $75 tickets for tonight's 8 p.m. screening and a post-theater party at the Baltimore Museum of Art are sold out.Kathleen Turner, Sam Waterston and other stars of Mr. Waters' "Serial Mom" will join a crowd of about 800 at the historic theater to watch the movie, which doesn't open to the general public until April 15. The event benefits AIDS Action Baltimore.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 2, 1993
Kathleen Turner will star in John Waters' new film "Serial Mom," which will begin shooting here April 12.Waters, with a mordant giggle, describes the film as "A true-crime parody about a sweet, lovable, serial killer who could be your own mother." Turner has the title role and her daughter will be played by Waters' regular Rikki Lake, though other cast members have not yet been set.Turner, a powerhouse blond who leapt to instant fame with "Body Heat," has forged a mainstream career with such films as "The War of the Roses" and "Romancing the Stone."
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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Look homeward, hon.John Waters premiered his latest movie, "Serial Mom," at the Senator Theatre last night with all the trappings of Hollywood -- a sparkly star, Kathleen Turner, a red carpet, the limos and the tanned and the sunglassed -- but there's no mistaking the heart and soul of this production."
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 7, 1994
Middle-aged, middle-brow. Hardly the stuff of John Waters movies. Van Smith, costume designer for "Serial Mom," Waters' newest, shopped such moderate shops as Casual Corner and Talbot's to dress the stars. This costuming from the man who dressed the grotesques in all the Waters films. The man who practically invented fright fashion, which he pulled from dusty thrift bins and seedy sex catalogs."I really enjoyed the early movies," Mr. Smith says. "It was a great creative outlet, creating a character, a totally different venue.
NEWS
April 20, 1994
"Serial Mom," the John Waters film that opened last week, brings to three the number of made-in-Baltimore films showing here simultaneously. The other two, "Guarding Tess" and "Major League II," however, aren't quite the genuine article. Indeed, "Major League II" features Oriole Park at Camden Yards disguised as a stadium in Cleveland, for heaven's sake! By contrast, "Serial Mom" was filmed in Towson, which appears as Towson in the movie. And with the exception of a few actors, it is a thoroughly Baltimore production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2004
Last weekM-Fs question Which September release is at the top of your must-see list? 3.8 percent Cellular 30.8 percent A Dirty Shame 26.9 percent The Forgotten 0 percent The Motorcycle Diaries 11.5 percent Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow 7.7 percent Wimbledon 7.7 percent All of the above 11.5 percent Other 26 votes This weekM-Fs question What is your favorite John Waters movie? Cry-Baby Hairspray Pecker Pink Flamingos Polyester Serial Mom All of his newer stuff All of his old stuff I donM-Ft like his movies Vote at www.baltimoresun.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | July 20, 2007
Baltimore's summer love affair with outdoor movies expands into yet another venue tomorrow, with an 8:30 p.m. showing of Raiders of the Lost Ark on a 26-by-14-foot inflatable screen in Dundalk Heritage Park, behind the Dundalk Shopping Center off Merritt Boulevard. Festivities, organized by the Dundalk Renaissance Corp., begin at 7:30 p.m. The free screening is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Information: 410-282-0261. Other free outdoor screenings in the coming week: Tom Hanks, Audrey Tautou and Ian McKellen in Ron Howard's The Da Vinci Code (2006)
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September 23, 2004
Last weekM-Fs question Which September release is at the top of your must-see list? 3.8 percent Cellular 30.8 percent A Dirty Shame 26.9 percent The Forgotten 0 percent The Motorcycle Diaries 11.5 percent Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow 7.7 percent Wimbledon 7.7 percent All of the above 11.5 percent Other 26 votes This weekM-Fs question What is your favorite John Waters movie? Cry-Baby Hairspray Pecker Pink Flamingos Polyester Serial Mom All of his newer stuff All of his old stuff I donM-Ft like his movies Vote at www.baltimoresun.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | February 28, 1999
Here's Ricki Lake's take on her fellow mike-grasping milkers of daytime dysfunction: Jerry is "a perfect gentleman"; Leeza is "so articulate and so smart"; and Oprah, of course, is "the queen."Lake, sitting in a sunny spot in the Garden Terrace Lounge in the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington, has nothing negative to say about anyone or anything, except herself."I'm very neurotic about what people say about me, what I look like. It feels like a bigger deal now than it did back then," says Lake, 30."
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1997
Mary Avara, 87 years old and still frank, feisty and furious at John Waters, stands ready to start all over again.For two decades she reigned as Maryland's, and America's, last, loudest and best-known movie censor, snipping away at "dirty pictures" like the priest in "Cinema Paradiso."She helped slash scenes in films from Ingmar Bergman's "Monika," to "Promises! Promises!" which featured a half-clothed Jayne Mansfield, to that raunch classic, "Deep Throat.""If they appointed me, I'd go back tomorrow," she says.
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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1996
Towson High School looks like a military encampment these days.After years of delays, one of Baltimore County's oldest high schools -- which had national exposure in John Waters' film "Serial Mom" -- finally is being refurbished.But the $16 million project comes at an additional price.Students are taking chemistry and art classes in former drafting labs. They climb metal stairs outside the building to reach the second-floor library. And they have to contend with finicky weather to get to 20 portable classrooms outside the building.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
A couple of local college alumni turn up in separate programs tonight, and WMAR-TV pre-empts ABC's "On Our Own" with a local news special.* "Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- %J Sports-and-advertising star Bo Jackson tries acting in an out-of-character guest appearance. He plays a nanny who comes to the rescue after Dr. Mark Sloan (Dick Van Dyke) delivers quadruplets. One-time Towson State University student Dwight Schultz ("The A-Team") has a role. CBS.* "The Wright Verdicts" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1994
LONDON -- Baltimore-Washington cultural life came under critical scrutiny here this week as John Waters' "Serial Mom" opened at a half-dozen movie theaters and the Washington Ballet played Sadler's Wells.Mr. Waters got generally good reviews for continuing his celebration of wayward Baltimoreans as the slightly weary "Pope of Trash."The Washington Ballet was just trashed.The Big Issue, the journal of London's homeless street people, gave "Serial Mom" four stars, which no doubt means it's a whole lot better than sleeping rough in a doorway on The Strand.
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By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1994
In what is believed to be the biggest deal ever made with an actor, Savoy Pictures has agreed to pay Sylvester Stallone $20 million, or potentially an unprecedented percentage of total revenues, to star in a yet-to-be-determined movie in 1996.According to informed sources, the deal guarantees Mr. Stallone $20 million, or 20 percent of total receipts collected by Savoy from all media worldwide if those revenues exceed $100 million.Industry insiders say the agreement is staggering and could cause a domino effect in Hollywood, where today's biggest stars command $12 million-$15 million a picture against 15 percent of the distributor's receipts.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | June 11, 1994
LONDON -- Baltimore-Washington cultural life came under critical scrutiny here this week as John Waters' "Serial Mom" opened at a half-dozen movie theaters and the Washington Ballet played Sadler's Wells.Mr. Waters got generally good reviews for continuing his celebration of wayward Baltimoreans as the slightly weary "Pope of Trash."The Washington Ballet was just trashed.The Big Issue, the journal of London's homeless street people, gave "Serial Mom" four stars, which no doubt means it's a whole lot better than sleeping rough in a doorway on The Strand.
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