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Sergei Rachmaninoff

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff is best known for two wildly popular piano concertos, his sumptuous Second Symphony and some brilliant solo keyboard music. But if he had written nothing but the "All-Night Vigil," an unaccompanied choral work from 1915 also known as the "Vespers," Rachmaninoff would still rank among the greats. This subtly powerful setting of texts from the Russian Orthodox liturgy will be performed by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in an unusual presentation incorporating readings from by Shakespeare, Chekhov and others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff is best known for two wildly popular piano concertos, his sumptuous Second Symphony and some brilliant solo keyboard music. But if he had written nothing but the "All-Night Vigil," an unaccompanied choral work from 1915 also known as the "Vespers," Rachmaninoff would still rank among the greats. This subtly powerful setting of texts from the Russian Orthodox liturgy will be performed by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in an unusual presentation incorporating readings from by Shakespeare, Chekhov and others.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 6, 2004
Few works that make up the standard, played-all-the-time symphony orchestra repertoire were premiered in the United States. But a perennial favorite, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini by Sergei Rachmaninoff, received its first performance right here in Baltimore. Rachmaninoff himself was the soloist, appearing at the Lyric Theatre with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski. To commemorate that premiere -- Nov. 7, 1934 -- a 5-foot-wide, 300-pound black granite engraved plaque will be unveiled 70 years later at the Lyric, where it will be permanently displayed.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 6, 2004
Few works that make up the standard, played-all-the-time symphony orchestra repertoire were premiered in the United States. But a perennial favorite, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini by Sergei Rachmaninoff, received its first performance right here in Baltimore. Rachmaninoff himself was the soloist, appearing at the Lyric Theatre with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski. To commemorate that premiere -- Nov. 7, 1934 -- a 5-foot-wide, 300-pound black granite engraved plaque will be unveiled 70 years later at the Lyric, where it will be permanently displayed.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1997
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra audiences are in for "a good dose of Russian melancholia," says pianist Andre Watts, featured artist with the BSO this weekend.Watts will play Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, and the orchestra, under guest conductor Jerzy Semkow, will perform Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" Symphony No. 6 in B minor.Though their composers belonged to different centuries, the pieces were written less than a decade apart. The "Pathetique" (given its title by Tchaikovsky's brother and manager, Modest)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Jason Love and his Columbia Orchestra concluded the ensemble's 25th anniversary season at Jim Rouse Theatre on Saturday evening by staring down the turbulent 5th Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich. And true to form, neither Love nor his players flinched. Shostakovich spent most of his artistic life being bullied and harassed by the Soviet government, which perceived the moody ambiguity of his music as a threat to the dictum that "scientific socialism" would produce nothing but smiles of gratitude in Stalin's Communist paradise.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW - Some of the world's most gifted young musicians are wearing overcoats to class and trying to read sheet music by window light after a fire roared through three classrooms at the venerable Moscow State Conservatory. As aspiring performers and composers took final exams this week, there was no electricity, limited telephone service and a trickle of heat from an emergency system. A week after the Dec. 17 blaze, 16 precious concert grand pianos sat damaged or destroyed. Bundles of canvas hoses still dangled from the stairwells, and the air stank of soot.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
No banners hint of the treasures crowding the International Piano Archives' shelves. Nothing says, "Stop, linger, listen."You could walk by and never know you're passing one of the world's great collections of classical piano recordings. Maybe that's because of the location.Shrines to high art are usually found in New York City, or Vienna, or Paris, not College Park, Maryland. Yet, here you'll find everything from the sheet music Russian virtuoso Anton Rubinstein used on his 1872 tour of the United States to the 70-year-old piano rolls of Josef Hofmann, who is considered by many the finest classical pianist of this century.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
Missions and Masterworks presents "An Encore Performance," Friday, June 10, 7:30 p.m., at First United Methodist Church of Laurel, 424 Main St. Light refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Laurel resident Mack Statham and his son, Robert, perform classical piano music, including two-piano renditions of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonin Dvorak and Sergei Rachmaninoff. Proceeds will support the Thanksgiving in July Mission Project to benefit Price House, Talbot House and Reality House, which provide residential programs for adults battling addiction in the Laurel area.
FEATURES
October 8, 2001
Today in history: Oct. 8 In 1869, the 14th president of the United States, Franklin Pierce, died in Concord, N.H. In 1871, the Great Chicago Fire erupted while another deadly blaze broke out in Peshtigo, Wis. In 1892, Sergei Rachmaninoff publicly performed his piano Prelude in C-sharp minor in Moscow. In 1956, Don Larsen pitched the only perfect game in a World Series to date as the New York Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 2-0. In 1970, Soviet author Alexander Solzhenitsyn won the Nobel Prize for literature.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Jason Love and his Columbia Orchestra concluded the ensemble's 25th anniversary season at Jim Rouse Theatre on Saturday evening by staring down the turbulent 5th Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich. And true to form, neither Love nor his players flinched. Shostakovich spent most of his artistic life being bullied and harassed by the Soviet government, which perceived the moody ambiguity of his music as a threat to the dictum that "scientific socialism" would produce nothing but smiles of gratitude in Stalin's Communist paradise.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW - Some of the world's most gifted young musicians are wearing overcoats to class and trying to read sheet music by window light after a fire roared through three classrooms at the venerable Moscow State Conservatory. As aspiring performers and composers took final exams this week, there was no electricity, limited telephone service and a trickle of heat from an emergency system. A week after the Dec. 17 blaze, 16 precious concert grand pianos sat damaged or destroyed. Bundles of canvas hoses still dangled from the stairwells, and the air stank of soot.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
No banners hint of the treasures crowding the International Piano Archives' shelves. Nothing says, "Stop, linger, listen."You could walk by and never know you're passing one of the world's great collections of classical piano recordings. Maybe that's because of the location.Shrines to high art are usually found in New York City, or Vienna, or Paris, not College Park, Maryland. Yet, here you'll find everything from the sheet music Russian virtuoso Anton Rubinstein used on his 1872 tour of the United States to the 70-year-old piano rolls of Josef Hofmann, who is considered by many the finest classical pianist of this century.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 1997
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra audiences are in for "a good dose of Russian melancholia," says pianist Andre Watts, featured artist with the BSO this weekend.Watts will play Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, and the orchestra, under guest conductor Jerzy Semkow, will perform Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" Symphony No. 6 in B minor.Though their composers belonged to different centuries, the pieces were written less than a decade apart. The "Pathetique" (given its title by Tchaikovsky's brother and manager, Modest)
FEATURES
April 1, 1996
Day in history: April 1In 1873, composer Sergei Rachmaninoff was born in Novgorod Province, Russia.In 1933, Nazi Germany began its persecution of Jews with a boycott of Jewish-owned businesses.In 1945, U.S. forces launched the invasion of Okinawa during World War II.In 1946, a series of tidal waves struck the Hawaiian Islands, killing more than 170 people.In 1970, President Nixon signed a measure banning cigarette advertising on radio and television, to take effect after New Year's Day 1971.
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