Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSergei Prokofiev
IN THE NEWS

Sergei Prokofiev

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Sergei Prokofiev, the brilliant Russian composer, shook up the early part of the 20th century with works full of startling percussive energy. Fittingly, his grandson, Gabriel Prokofiev, is doing pretty much the same thing in the early part of the 21st, if in a decidedly different manner. The current Prokofiev, immersed in the world of techno dance and hip-hop, has written a Concerto for Turntables and Orchestra and string quartets that include remixes. The U.K.-based Prokofiev will make his Baltimore debut Friday at the Windup Space, along with fellow Londoners GeNIA, a Russian-born pianist with a flair for performing avant-garde repertoire (one of her impressive recent recordings on the innovative Nonclassical label is an all-Gabriel Prokofiev disc)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
If it has a good beat, you can count on Marin Alsop to conduct it with infectious energy. That point is being driven home by her latest program with the Baltimore Symphony, which has one more local performance before the orchestra takes it to Carnegie Hall on Monday. To start this sampling of 20th and 21st century repertoire, there is the pulsating “Shaker Loops,” an early-1980s classic of minimalism for string orchestra by John Adams. To close, Sergei Prokofiev's Symphony No. 4 (the revised version of 1947)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 16, 2001
Sergei Einstein and Sergei Prokofiev were the Steven Spielberg and John Williams of the Soviet Union - master filmmaker and master composer seeing eye to ear. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is closing its 2000-2001 season with the evocative music from a fascinating product of the Eisenstein/Prokofiev collaboration, "Ivan the Terrible." The epic biopic about Russia's first czar, begun in 1942, was in two parts; there would have been a third had not Stalin pulled the plug on the second (there's only so much film about a paranoid, ruthless dictator that a paranoid, ruthless dictator can take)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
Sergei Prokofiev, the brilliant Russian composer, shook up the early part of the 20th century with works full of startling percussive energy. Fittingly, his grandson, Gabriel Prokofiev, is doing pretty much the same thing in the early part of the 21st, if in a decidedly different manner. The current Prokofiev, immersed in the world of techno dance and hip-hop, has written a Concerto for Turntables and Orchestra and string quartets that include remixes. The U.K.-based Prokofiev will make his Baltimore debut Friday at the Windup Space, along with fellow Londoners GeNIA, a Russian-born pianist with a flair for performing avant-garde repertoire (one of her impressive recent recordings on the innovative Nonclassical label is an all-Gabriel Prokofiev disc)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Movie-making has advanced considerably since Sergei Eisenstein made his pro-Russian, anti-German (and anti-any other trespasser) Alexander Nevsky in 1938. Propaganda has gotten a lot slicker, too. But there's still something fresh about that film, with its frantic battle scenes, touches of humor and celebrations of self-sacrifice giving life to this tale of the 13th century hero who saved the motherland from a Teutonic horde. It has never lost the air of a classic, thanks in no small measure to the music written for it by Sergei Prokofiev.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
If it has a good beat, you can count on Marin Alsop to conduct it with infectious energy. That point is being driven home by her latest program with the Baltimore Symphony, which has one more local performance before the orchestra takes it to Carnegie Hall on Monday. To start this sampling of 20th and 21st century repertoire, there is the pulsating “Shaker Loops,” an early-1980s classic of minimalism for string orchestra by John Adams. To close, Sergei Prokofiev's Symphony No. 4 (the revised version of 1947)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2003
The night Joseph Stalin died 50 years ago, his enemies, real and imagined, could breathe a little easier. Unfortunately, one of those who would have enjoyed greater peace of mind also died that same night - Sergei Prokofiev, who, like Dmitri Shostakovich, knew all too well about official disfavor during the Stalin era. On Tuesday, the Peabody Institute commemorated the exact semi-centennial of Prokofiev's death with a substantial, exceptionally well-played...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
There's a thin line between art and entertainment, an equally thin one between entertainment and propaganda. Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 film Alexander Nevsky, with its spectacular musical score by Sergei Prokofiev, manages to combine art, entertainment and propaganda in one indelible package. Today, the political implications do not overwhelm the movie, as they would have for audiences in the Soviet Union during the Stalin era. The artistic quality is what strikes home most forcefully now, as is bound to be the case when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents a performance of Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky in synch with the film tonight and tomorrow.
NEWS
November 7, 2002
Candlelight Concerts will present cellist David Finckel and pianist Wu Han in a performance of works by Prokofiev, Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff at 8 p.m. Saturday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre in Columbia. Finckel and Han will play selections from their latest compact disc Russian Classics -- Sergei Prokofiev's Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op. 119; Dmitri Shostakovich's Sonata in D minor for Cello and Piano, Op. 40; and Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor, Op. 19, by Sergei Vassilyevich Rachmaninoff.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | November 3, 2003
Yuri Temirkanov, music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, will not be on the podium this week as scheduled "so that he may undergo a routine medical procedure," according to a statement released by orchestra management over the weekend. Temirkanov is expected to resume his BSO schedule next week, rehearsing and conducting a program devoted to Sergei Prokofiev's score for the classic Sergei Eisenstein film Alexander Nevsky, performed in synch with the film. Last week, Temirkanov completed a month-long tour with his other orchestra, the St. Petersburg Philharmonic, which began in Asia and concluded in Berlin.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Movie-making has advanced considerably since Sergei Eisenstein made his pro-Russian, anti-German (and anti-any other trespasser) Alexander Nevsky in 1938. Propaganda has gotten a lot slicker, too. But there's still something fresh about that film, with its frantic battle scenes, touches of humor and celebrations of self-sacrifice giving life to this tale of the 13th century hero who saved the motherland from a Teutonic horde. It has never lost the air of a classic, thanks in no small measure to the music written for it by Sergei Prokofiev.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 13, 2003
There's a thin line between art and entertainment, an equally thin one between entertainment and propaganda. Sergei Eisenstein's 1938 film Alexander Nevsky, with its spectacular musical score by Sergei Prokofiev, manages to combine art, entertainment and propaganda in one indelible package. Today, the political implications do not overwhelm the movie, as they would have for audiences in the Soviet Union during the Stalin era. The artistic quality is what strikes home most forcefully now, as is bound to be the case when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presents a performance of Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky in synch with the film tonight and tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 7, 2003
The night Joseph Stalin died 50 years ago, his enemies, real and imagined, could breathe a little easier. Unfortunately, one of those who would have enjoyed greater peace of mind also died that same night - Sergei Prokofiev, who, like Dmitri Shostakovich, knew all too well about official disfavor during the Stalin era. On Tuesday, the Peabody Institute commemorated the exact semi-centennial of Prokofiev's death with a substantial, exceptionally well-played...
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 16, 2001
Sergei Einstein and Sergei Prokofiev were the Steven Spielberg and John Williams of the Soviet Union - master filmmaker and master composer seeing eye to ear. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is closing its 2000-2001 season with the evocative music from a fascinating product of the Eisenstein/Prokofiev collaboration, "Ivan the Terrible." The epic biopic about Russia's first czar, begun in 1942, was in two parts; there would have been a third had not Stalin pulled the plug on the second (there's only so much film about a paranoid, ruthless dictator that a paranoid, ruthless dictator can take)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | October 23, 1997
Choo-San Goh, whose choreographic genius came to an abrupt end in 1987, when he died of AIDS at the age of 39, has not been forgotten. The Washington Ballet, where he was resident choreographer for eight years, maintains the 14 ballets created by the Singaporean artist and next week will bring back three for a benefit performance.Co-sponsored by the Embassy of the Republic of Singapore, the program will include "Double Contrasts," an elegant nocturne in black and white, and "Synonyms," both created in 1978; and the pas de deux from "Momentum," which won an award for choreography at the 1983 International Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
NEW YORK -- Carnegie Hall put out the purple Monday night to welcome the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra for the opening of Spring For Music, a week-long festival showcasing American orchestras playing adventurous programs. Ravens-colored cloths adorned the seat backs of the musicians' chairs and the conductor's podium; more cloths were handed out to audience members to wave on cue in a salute to Baltimore. That cue came before the music started when an announcer from local radio station  WQXR interviewed the BSO's high-profile booster, Gov. Martin O'Malley, onstage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.