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Serenade

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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A teen cancer patient at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center is set to be serenaded later today by Disney star Savannah Outen. According to the hospital, Outen is to fly in Monday and sing to cancer patient Bo Oliver, who's 16. She'll be singing a song she wrote in Bo's honor. The treat for Bo is the work of Music is Medicine's Donate a Song program.  Any profits from the tune called "Brave and True" will go to Johns Hopkins pediatric oncology research. Like Justin Bieber, Outen launched her career on YouTube.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
This is not how Maryland imagined its final Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season game against North Carolina State to end -- with Wolfpack fans mocking the Terps by chanting “ACC, ACC.” Maryland's decision to join the Big Ten next season is a favorite theme for road fans this season. One fan yelled that Maryland should take its millions from the Big Ten and not come back. Of course, the fans would not be so emboldened if the Terps -- who surrendered an 11-point lead and lost, 65-56 -- were a better team on the road.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 16, 2000
Sure, New York cabaret singer Mary Cleere Haran's performance of George Gershwin tunes was terrific. But the highlight of this year's Center Stage Presents came when Haran led the audience of 600 at the Baltimore theater in a serenade to outgoing managing director Peter Culman. "Once In Love With Amy" may have seemed a little odd, except for the story behind it, which Haran told the audience. In 1948, 10 year-old Culman was taken to see his first Broadway show, "Where's Charlie?" When Ray Bolger, the show's star, sang "Amy," Culman stood up in the audience and sang with him. This time around, Culman was playfully conducting the Center Stage sing-along.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
A teen cancer patient at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center is set to be serenaded later today by Disney star Savannah Outen. According to the hospital, Outen is to fly in Monday and sing to cancer patient Bo Oliver, who's 16. She'll be singing a song she wrote in Bo's honor. The treat for Bo is the work of Music is Medicine's Donate a Song program.  Any profits from the tune called "Brave and True" will go to Johns Hopkins pediatric oncology research. Like Justin Bieber, Outen launched her career on YouTube.
NEWS
July 28, 2006
The Bad Influence Band, left, belts out classic rock 'n' roll at the Centennial Park Sunset Serenades concert series. The program has three remaining concerts: Aug. 2, beach music with Sons of Pirates; Aug. 9, steel drums with EWABO; Aug. 16, David Bach Consort's world beat jazz.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1997
As ballet lore has it, George Balanchine clapped his hands for attention at the end of class one day in 1934. "Mmmm," he said to his students. "I think we'll start something."That "something" was the ballet called "Serenade." As the title suggests, it's a nocturne, a song to the night, hushed and ephemeral as moonlight. It is also a masterpiece."Serenade" was the first ballet the Russian-born Balanchine made in America and also the first major abstract ballet in dance history. Intended as a teaching piece, it is today in the repertory of every major ballet company in the world.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | February 3, 2007
Poetry and music are forever addressing issues of life and death. When the two art forms are brought together in that pursuit, the results can be doubly, deeply revealing and affecting. Such is the case with Benjamin Britten's Serenade for tenor, horn and strings, an extraordinarily subtle reflection on mortality. The work's exquisite imagery and arresting sounds enveloped Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday afternoon. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's repeat performance this morning should be well worth catching.
NEWS
By e. l. maugans | April 28, 1993
three flights up on calvert street, under my kitchen sink, a cricketdisrupts my sleep with manyan indomitable beep.becoming quiet when he hears me stirawake,he resumes his serenade with vigor,encouraged to think me the matefor whom he waits.perhaps i shall followhis tireless exampleand try for a reply:beep, beep.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Testa | March 20, 2008
Tony Bennett has had a wild ride. He served in World War II, had his career take a dive in the '70s, made a comeback in the '80s and is even a painter. Above all, people know him as a classic singer of the Great American Songbook. With his signature style and trademark tuxedo, Bennett will serenade the audience at the Meyerhoff at 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $42-$97. The Meyerhoff Symphony Hall is at 1212 Cathedral St. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | October 25, 1993
The Washington Ballet packed Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium Saturday night with fans hungry for ballet. Artistic director and founder Mary Day satisfied everybody with her company's first-rate , dancing and with a program of three solid works by George Balanchine, Nils Christie and Choo San Goh.Opening the evening was Balanchine's "Serenade" to "Serenade in C major for String Orchestra" by Tchaikovsky. It is the first ballet Balanchine created in the United States, and it remains the epitome of modern classical style.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Broadwater | February 14, 2013
Glee. Valentine's Day. Wedding. Aww. Right? Wrong. Let's cut to the chase. Mr. Schu gets jilted at the altar. To the tune of "(Not) Getting Married Today" from the musical "Company. " Finn of course thinks Emma's no-show has to do with their impromptu kiss last week. Mr. Schu, still in the dark about the aforementioned kiss his best man planted on his fiancee, thinks it's that Emma was overwhelmed by his absence the past few months. (And can we talk about why Finn is the best man?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
Prom season opens early at McDonogh School, with the invitation taking on as much import as the first dance step. One senior wrote a song, strummed his guitar and serenaded his girlfriend with a lyrical invitation to the event, set for Tuesday at Rams Head Live downtown. "I strolled around the library singing to people," said senior Dennis Chen. "Then I just pulled up a chair and asked Emma. " That would be classmate Emma Warden, who accepted her singing beau's well-orchestrated "ask," the students' term for these traditional invitations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2008
Just announced Patti LaBelle -- Pier Six Pavilion on Sept. 6. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Rick Ross & Friends -- 1st Mariner Arena on June 20. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Deanna Bogart Band -- Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis on July 26. 410-268-4545 or ramsheadtavern.com. All Time Low -- Rams Head Live on July 18. 410-244-1131 or ramsheadlive.com. emmet swimming -- The 9:30 Club in Washington on June 28. 800-955-5566 or tickets.com. Still available Kenny G -- Wolf Trap Barns in Vienna, Va., on June 12. 410-481-6500 or 800-955-5566.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Testa | March 20, 2008
Tony Bennett has had a wild ride. He served in World War II, had his career take a dive in the '70s, made a comeback in the '80s and is even a painter. Above all, people know him as a classic singer of the Great American Songbook. With his signature style and trademark tuxedo, Bennett will serenade the audience at the Meyerhoff at 8 p.m. Saturday. Tickets are $42-$97. The Meyerhoff Symphony Hall is at 1212 Cathedral St. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
By Jessica Dexheimer and Jessica Dexheimer,Sun reporter | June 22, 2007
Kathy Davis of Ellicott City brought her daughters, 12-year-old Eryn and 10-year-old Brittany, so that they could celebrate the start of summer with three of their friends. "Today was the last day of school," said Davis. "So this is kind of a celebration. We're eating dinner here, enjoying the music, then heading back home for movies and a sleepover." The Davis entourage was among the hundreds of people attending Wednesday evening's Sunset Serenade concert at Ellicott City's Centennial Park.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | June 13, 2007
The first time Nichole Hickey heard the Millers play, she knew she wanted the hard-charging blues and rock band to appear in the Sunset Serenade series at Centennial Park. And that is exactly what is happening. The group from Indiana, consisting of three brothers and their father, will kick off the annual summertime music series tonight. The 7 p.m. performance is free, though a $3 parking donation is requested. Hickey, executive director of Columbia Festival of the Arts, first saw the band strut its stuff at a talent showcase in Memphis, Tenn.
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
The dance students glide - and sometimes stumble noisily - across the gray wood floor. Their hair is pinned back in tight little buns, their toes are crammed into pointe shoes. The choreography has brought them center stage, staggered in four lines, with two girls lying on the floor in the middle. Judith Fugate stops the rehearsal. Something is wrong. It is day six, hour four of rehearsals for George Balanchine's ballet Serenade. The dancers - students at the Baltimore School for the Arts - are exhausted.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 17, 1999
Violinist-conductor Pinchas Zukerman's final season as artistic director of the Baltimore Symphony's Summer MusicFest got off to a splendid start last night in Meyerhoff Hall. After a pre-concert chamber music performance -- which I was not able to attend -- the orchestral program began with Zukerman leading Mozart's Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments in B-flat (K. 361) and concluded with Vivaldi's "Four Seasons," with Zukerman playing a double role as solo violinist and conductor.Unknown a mere 50 years ago, the "Four Seasons" are now almost impossible to escape -- whether one is in an elevator, in an automobile or in a supermarket.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | February 3, 2007
Poetry and music are forever addressing issues of life and death. When the two art forms are brought together in that pursuit, the results can be doubly, deeply revealing and affecting. Such is the case with Benjamin Britten's Serenade for tenor, horn and strings, an extraordinarily subtle reflection on mortality. The work's exquisite imagery and arresting sounds enveloped Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Thursday afternoon. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's repeat performance this morning should be well worth catching.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | November 3, 2006
Travel south to Miami for the white beaches, winter sun, art deco and Cuban mojitos. But when it comes to first-rate chamber music, there's no need to pack the flip-flops - Miami exports one of the nation's finest string quartets. The Miami String Quartet is heading north and will perform at 8 p.m. tomorrow at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre, sponsored by the Candlelight Concert Society. Candlelight's artistic director, Holly Thomas, said she was delighted to present these acclaimed artists in Smith Theatre, "a true chamber music setting" where performers "feel close enough to the audience to be able to relate to them."
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