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Serbs In Bosnia

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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The spine-stiffening British are still at it, but with a different result nowadays.In the Persian Gulf crisis, then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher warned President Bush not to go wobbly against Saddam Hussein.Now her successor, John Major, is exhorting President Clinton to stand firm in a different way: against political pressure for military action against the Serbs in Bosnia.Since Serbian aggression in Bosnia began more than a year ago, Britain has pressed for a political solution and resisted any move that might interfere with the noncoercive delivery of relief supplies or put at risk British forces already on the ground in the Balkans.
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NEWS
By Dusko Doder | April 8, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The end of Slobodan Milosevic's 13-year rule dragged on for six months with all the elements of a Balkan farce. The man who no longer was president lived in the presidential mansion while the new president continued to reside in his two-bedroom apartment in downtown Belgrade. The new president, Vojislav Kostunica, was not informed when the Serbian police finally moved to arrest his predecessor. In fact, an army unit under Mr. Kostunica's control, blocked the first police attempt to serve an arrest warrant.
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NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer Charles Corddry of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | May 14, 1993
BELGRADE -- Bosnian Serb radicals would respond to a Western military attack on Serbian facilities in Bosnia with immediate reprisals against allied personnel and possible missile attacks against neighboring countries, Bosnian Serb sources have warned.The warnings from sources linked to the Bosnian Serb government have been widely reported and discussed in Serbian newspapers. There has been persistent speculation that fanatical nationalists would resort to taking foreign hostages in case of U.S. air strikes on Bosnian Serbs.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 29, 1999
PARIS -- Serbs, with some honorable exceptions, seem unable to concede that the cause of their war with NATO is not the goals they have for the Serbian nation, but how they have gone about getting what they want.The Western powers have defended Kosovo autonomy, not its independence. They have now set peace terms that logically imply independence -- withdrawal of all Serb forces and installation of a foreign troop presence -- because President Slobodan Milosevic's program to expel ethnic Albanians from Kosovo has left them no alternative.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 3, 1993
LONDON -- Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic agreed to an international peace plan yesterday to end a year of ethnic carnage, but a skeptical United States pushed ahead in lining up a military coalition to intervene in the Balkans.With the threat of Western air power looming and pressure from Serbia, Mr. Karadzic signed on in Athens, Greece, to the peace plan, which requires the Serbs to give back land to outgunned Muslims and Croats and carves Bosnia into 10 semiautonomous regions.The plan must now be approved by the self-proclaimed Bosnian Serb parliament.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | April 22, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- In a defiant response to tighter United Nations sanctions and the prospect of allied military strikes on Serbian targets in Bosnia, the leaders of Serbs in Bosnia and Croatia are planning to create a new common state.A decision has already been made to form a joint parliament, which would hold its first session Saturday.Yugoslav President Dobrica Cosic and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic have been invited to attend the session at Bosanski Novi, a Sarajevo district recently renamed Novi Grad, but there were no immediate indications that either would attend.
NEWS
May 31, 1993
Heavy fighting wracked SARAJEVO, possibly as a result of a move by government forces to cut Bosnian Serb supply lines south of the Bosnian capital. Police said 20 people were killed and 137 wounded in the assault by Bosnian Serbs. Fierce battles also were reported around the besieged town of GORAZDE, where Bosnian radio said Serbs had breached defense lines.United Nations sanctions against Yugoslavia for backing the rebel Serbs in Bosnia reached the one-year stage. The effects of supporting the ethnic war, plus the sanctions, have left Yugoslavia with a monthly inflation rate of 200 percent, almost 50 percent unemployment and a 50 percent cut in industrial output.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
Saber-rattling in Washington brought the first restraint by Serbs in Bosnia. Radovan Karadzic signed a cease-fire in Athens. Guns around Sarajevo sputtered. U.N. convoys were let through to beleaguered Muslims. So far, so good. Nothing the United States can say communicates so clearly, to a certain class of statesman, as pizza delivered to the Pentagon at midnight.But President Clinton is right to keep the focus on what Serbs do, not what they say. Dr. Karadzic and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic have signed pieces of paper before.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | February 12, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The unveiling of President Clinton's policy toward Bosnia was greeted here with a sigh of relief. The threat of a military intervention has been averted for now.Belgrade officials did not make any official comment. But the tone in the government-controlled news media revealed satisfaction that the United States had opted for negotiations rather than the immediate, gun-blazing Western intervention demanded by Bosnian Muslims.Officials, however, privately expressed concern that the Clinton administration will now bend over backward to mollify the Muslims, who object to a proposal by international mediators Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen to divide Bosnia-Herzegovina into 10 ethnic autonomous regions.
NEWS
July 8, 1996
THE SCORPION DANCE between Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and the international community trying to bring him to trial on war crimes charges goes on day after frustrating day. He has called the bluff of officials threatening economic sanctions. His so-called resignation as president of his tiny Republica Srpska is confirmed and denied repeatedly by supporters who let it be known he still holds real power.For Mr. Karadzic and his legions of enemies, a deadline looms. On Sept. 14, at U.S. insistence, elections will be held in Bosnia to set up a faux unitary state ostensibly embracing the warring Serb, Muslim and Croat populations.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a breakthrough toward ending Europe's bloodiest conflict since World War II, the former Yugoslavia's three warring sides agreed yesterday on a division of Bosnia that grants Bosnia's Serbs a largely self-governing state of their own.The agreement announced in Geneva required all sides to give up some loudly professed principles. Muslims, Croats and Serbs agreed to split Bosnia along ethnic lines, with a Muslim-Croat federation getting 51 percent, and a Serbian republic getting 49 percent, as well as its own name.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
While the U.S. Congress continues to meddle destructively in the Balkans, Croatian forces have moved decisively in the past week to readjust a military balance that has consistently favored the Serbs since the breakup of the Yugoslav federation. The contrast between blather on the banks of the Potomac and the realities of an ever-shifting civil war has rarely been stronger.If the re-equipped and retrained Croatian army can effectively put pressure on the Bosnian Serb aggressors without precipitating an open clash with the powers that be in Belgrade, this could have far more impact on the three-year struggle than posturing on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN | August 7, 1994
Belgrade. -- With Bosnia poised on the brink of further disaster after months of relative calm, reading the minds of the Serbs has again become an important, if risky, business for Western watchers of the Balkans.But from the top reaches of the Serbian government on down to the farmers of the patriotic heartland, the laments and logic of the Serbs can seem universally baffling. In short, how can one understand a people who don't seem able to understand themselves?In one moment they complain of being criticized and quarantined by a misunderstanding world.
NEWS
March 27, 1994
United Nations peacekeepers destroyed a Serb bunker near MAGLAJ with 30mm cannon fire following a seven-hour exchange of fire, in one of the most serious confrontations between U.N. forces and Serbs in Bosnia's two-year war, officials said.The incident was one of five Friday involving attacks on U.N. troops in Bosnia, officials said, including a Serbian shelling attack on a U.N. base near BUGOJNO that left two British soldiers seriously wounded. Other attacks were reported near BIHAC, SREBRENICA and MOSTAR.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | May 26, 1993
TWO tragedies are taking place in Bosnia. The first is the slaughter of its people. The second is the failure of the officials responsible to think seriously about how to prevent future slaughters in future Bosnias.Maybe that is because those officials are still on the job -- in allthree sides in the civil war, in Europe and in the U.S.Europe helped set the fire of civil war and it should have been Europe's to put out. But Washington, ranging from silence to utter incomprehensibility, dithers away the one plan for peace.
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