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By DAN BERGER | January 2, 2002
If this is the new Millennium, it crept in on little cats' feet. Indians and Pakistanis have in common with Serbs and Croats, Ulster Protestants and Catholics, Hutu and Tutsi, that nobody but themselves can tell them apart. This year, monitor progress in math, with StatStat. They could always put the Greyhound bus station in the Greyhound Bus Station. Cheer up. Buffalo has snow.
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NEWS
October 27, 2002
Leonard Green, 68, founder of the West Coast's largest merchant and investment banking firm and chairman of the board of the Los Angeles Opera, died Friday of complications from heart surgery in Venice, Italy, where he was on vacation. In 1969, Mr. Green co-founded Gibbons, Green, van Amerongen, a pioneer firm in the management buyout industry. Specializing in management-led, nonhostile leveraged buyouts, Mr. Green then established his own firm, Leonard Green & Partners in Los Angeles, in 1989.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 1993
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- While Muslim leaders in Sarajevo resist pressure to carve Bosnia into ethnic states for Muslims, Serbs, and Croats, Serbian nationalist leaders are looking beyond partition toward the extinction of Muslims as an independent political force.Leaders of the Serbian nationalists in Bosnia, whose forces control more than 70 percent of the former Yugoslav republic, have said they are prepared to exchange land in a peace settlement and allow Muslims to have what they call "a small Muslim state" surrounded by larger states for Croats and Serbs.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 2, 2002
If this is the new Millennium, it crept in on little cats' feet. Indians and Pakistanis have in common with Serbs and Croats, Ulster Protestants and Catholics, Hutu and Tutsi, that nobody but themselves can tell them apart. This year, monitor progress in math, with StatStat. They could always put the Greyhound bus station in the Greyhound Bus Station. Cheer up. Buffalo has snow.
NEWS
August 31, 1993
The peace talks in GENEVA failed to resume as scheduled. They were pushed back to Tuesday because Bosnia's Muslim President, Alija Izetbegovic, had difficulty leaving Sarajevo.Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said it was too late for the Muslims to bargain over the map and warned they could lose everything in a two-way carve-up between Serbs and Croats if they tried.The U.N. Security Council condemned the use of U.N. troops as pawns in the Bosnian war as at least Spanish peacekeepers spent the fifth day trapped in the Muslim sector of MOSTAR.
NEWS
October 27, 2002
Leonard Green, 68, founder of the West Coast's largest merchant and investment banking firm and chairman of the board of the Los Angeles Opera, died Friday of complications from heart surgery in Venice, Italy, where he was on vacation. In 1969, Mr. Green co-founded Gibbons, Green, van Amerongen, a pioneer firm in the management buyout industry. Specializing in management-led, nonhostile leveraged buyouts, Mr. Green then established his own firm, Leonard Green & Partners in Los Angeles, in 1989.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- With Jews and Muslim seated side by side on chartered buses and ducking together to avoid sniper fire, more than 200 people escaped this cold and hungry city yesterday in an evacuation effort by Sarajevo's small Jewish population.For the evacuees, among them many Serbs and Croats, it was a journey of only a few minutes from the last roadblock of the mainly Muslim forces defending the Bosnian capital to the first checkpoint of the besieging Serbs. But it may as well have been a lifetime.
NEWS
February 11, 1994
Although NATO has put itself in a hair-trigger position to start dropping bombs on Bosnia, the United States can still avoid military intervention if a long-needed switch in administration strategy produces results. For the first time since he took office, President Clinton has come out strongly for partition and has made it clear the U.S. will no longer encourage the Bosnian Muslims to keep fighting for more territory.It was this change in the American position that enabled NATO to set a 10-day deadline for the withdrawal of heavy Bosnian Serb military equipment from the mountains surrounding Sarajevo.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | November 15, 1994
Pittsburgh.--The end of American participation in the arms blockade on the Bosnian Muslims will likely widen the war. Indeed, that seems to be its goal. The State Department has expressed great ''understanding'' of Muslim attacks on Serbs. Arming the Muslims is clearly meant to produce more such understandable attacks.The American reasons for taking this course are supposedly moral, reponding to ''Serbian aggression'' against Bosnia, a member of the United Nations. Yet the Bosnian ''state'' that in 1992 was so quickly and carelessly recognized and installed in the U.N., on American demand and to American orchestration, was rejected by a huge propor- tion of its supposed citizens, Serbs and Croats, who did not want to be included in it. Since then, the Serbs and Croats have shared a goal, of ensuring that the ''state'' of Bosnia that was meant to be imposed upon them has no power over them.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | February 6, 1994
Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher commented recentlythat the West European effort to bring about a settlement of the Bosnian war revealed a "strange moral compass." Instead, America's superior morality has opted for greater war.For at least the fourth time since the Bosnian tragedy began in 1992, the U.S. government has encouraged the Muslims to reject a peace settlement that they had been about to sign, always on the grounds that it was a bad deal. In each case the result has been disaster for the Muslims, as the Serbs and Croats have then taken more of the republic.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Four years after Bosnia's war, weekend elections showed how deep the ethnic divide in this country remains, as Muslim voters shifted toward moderate leaders while Serbs and Croats stayed with old-style nationalists. Although official preliminary results in the vote for municipal councils were not expected until today, the contending parties' estimates of their showings yesterday were being regarded as reliable. In the past, such assertions have generally proved accurate.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A worried Clinton administration is beginning a major campaign to shore up Bosnia's fragile peace and prevent a renewed crisis once NATO peacekeepers pull out next year.Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright plans to "read the riot act" to leaders of the former Yugoslavia next week during meetings in Portugal and the Balkans, a senior official said.The rebuke is aimed particularly at Serbs and Croats, who, officials charge, have fallen down on pledges made at the 1995 U.S.-brokered peace conference in Dayton, Ohio, that ended Europe's bloodiest war in a generation.
NEWS
November 28, 1996
UNREST IN BELGRADE, capital of Serbia, and Zagreb, capital of Croatia, undermines the strong men who brought wars to Yugoslavia. And since they agreed to the peace, it undermines that.Franjo Tudjman, president of Croatia, is 74 and was rushed to Walter Reed Hospital with what authorities in Washington called stomach cancer and in Zagreb called digestive problems. Then he went home to witness strikes for wages and against government suppression of the last independent radio station.Mr. Tudjman had quit as a general in Communist dictator Tito's Yugoslav army decades ago to pursue Croat nationalism and write revisionist history.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton intervened to prevent a collapse of the Bosnian peace process yesterday after new disputes broke out over territory, U.S. officials said.The White House informed congressional leaders that if the Muslim-led Bosnian government, Serbian and Croatian delegations failed to reach an agreement, a partial deal could be announced and the talks would be recessed for a week. But a White House official said late last evening that U.S. mediators were still pressing for a comprehensive settlement.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS and MARK MATTHEWS,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One joke about U.S. envoy and Balkan man-of-the-hour Richard C. Holbrooke testifies to his seemingly inexhaustible drive for self-promotion:What's the most dangerous place to be in Bosnia?Answer: Between Richard Holbrooke and a TV camera.A large and hungry ego is a useful ingredient in diplomacy, which only showers publicity on people who get results. And with the four agreements he has brokered between Bosnians, Serbs and Croats -- capped by President Clinton's announcement yesterday of a planned cease-fire and talks leading to a peace conference -- Mr. Holbrooke has proved he can deliver the goods in a region that has defied peace efforts for three years.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | November 15, 1994
Pittsburgh.--The end of American participation in the arms blockade on the Bosnian Muslims will likely widen the war. Indeed, that seems to be its goal. The State Department has expressed great ''understanding'' of Muslim attacks on Serbs. Arming the Muslims is clearly meant to produce more such understandable attacks.The American reasons for taking this course are supposedly moral, reponding to ''Serbian aggression'' against Bosnia, a member of the United Nations. Yet the Bosnian ''state'' that in 1992 was so quickly and carelessly recognized and installed in the U.N., on American demand and to American orchestration, was rejected by a huge propor- tion of its supposed citizens, Serbs and Croats, who did not want to be included in it. Since then, the Serbs and Croats have shared a goal, of ensuring that the ''state'' of Bosnia that was meant to be imposed upon them has no power over them.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | November 19, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- As the savage fighting between Serbs and Croats day by day reduces Yugoslavia to the ancient hatreds of its tribal past, it appears to be feeding the minds of children in a way that is poisoning the future, too.The children in the besieged portions of Croatia are difficult to reach, observe and interview. But among the Serbian children -- those who live in Serbia and those who have fled with their families from their former Croatian homes -- the effects are plain, and child therapists say that the legacy of bitter personal feeling may be more profound from this fighting than from World War II.Serbs and Croats then were attacked by forces from outside.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1993
GENEVA, Switzerland -- Striving to negotiate an end to the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina before winter sets in, international mediators presented a draft peace accord to Bosnian Muslim, Serb and Croat leaders yesterday and gave them 10 days in which to accept or reject it.Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia's president, and Franjo Tudjman, Croatia's president, who joined the peace talks Thursday, immediately backed the plan. Leaders of Bosnian Serbs and Croats said they had reservations, although they indicated that they were willing to accept it.The Bosnian Muslim delegation, headed by President Alija Izetbegovic, said last night that they were "not satisfied with what we have been offered" and complained that under the draft agreement "the Serbs will not give up ethnically cleansed territories which were taken by force."
NEWS
April 6, 1994
The latest Serb offensive in Bosnia -- this one against the Muslim enclave of Goradze -- should be a reminder that Balkan wars of partition and attrition are as old as the millennium. Empires and nations wax and wane in that part of the world, with new political entities rising on the graves of the old, and the grievances they leave behind are not forgotten over decades and even centuries.Thus it should come as no surprise that the tenuous peace forced by the big powers in Sarajevo in February, the Muslim-Croat agreement to confederate and the Croat-Serb cease fire have not brought peace.
NEWS
February 11, 1994
Although NATO has put itself in a hair-trigger position to start dropping bombs on Bosnia, the United States can still avoid military intervention if a long-needed switch in administration strategy produces results. For the first time since he took office, President Clinton has come out strongly for partition and has made it clear the U.S. will no longer encourage the Bosnian Muslims to keep fighting for more territory.It was this change in the American position that enabled NATO to set a 10-day deadline for the withdrawal of heavy Bosnian Serb military equipment from the mountains surrounding Sarajevo.
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