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By New York Times News Service | October 17, 1993
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- After a lull of several weeks, Serbian nationalist forces resumed their heavy artillery bombardment of Sarajevo yesterday, setting off panic on the city's streets and raising fear that the siege could take a sharp turn for the worse just as winter approaches.The Serbian forces on the slopes of mountains overlooking the Bosnian capital began their barrage before dawn, hitting the city center with at least 30 152-millimeter tank shells, the most destructive weapon in their arsenal.
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NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
THE HAGUE - Victim by victim, the prosecution in Slobodan Milosevic's war crimes trial is demonstrating that within hours of the start of NATO's 1999 bombing campaign the Yugoslav government began executing a comprehensive and systematic plan to expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians from Kosovo. Milosevic, acting as his own lawyer, is arguing that the 800,000 Albanians who fled their homes after the bombing began March 24, 1999, did so because they were afraid of NATO bombs, not because they were terrorized by Serbian police and paramilitaries.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- An American military rescue team recovered an Air Force F-117 Nighthawk pilot after his plane went down yesterday in a village about 25 miles west of Belgrade during the fourth consecutive night of bombing runs over Yugoslavia.Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon said last night that the pilot was at an allied base, but he was uncertain whether he had been injured.The loss of the plane came as NATO shifted the focus of its bombing campaign from Yugoslav air-defense systems to Serbian forces attacking ethnic Albanians in Kosovo.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 2001
PARIS - The United Nations war crimes tribunal at The Hague, Netherlands, has published its second indictment of the former Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic, charging him yesterday with war crimes in Croatia, including the persecution, deportation, torture and murder of civilians in 1991 and 1992. A tribunal official said the document was to be presented promptly to Milosevic in the tribunal jail, where he has been since June, awaiting trial on earlier charges that he committed war crimes in Kosovo.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 1, 1992
TRAVNIK, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- By horse cart and on hug plow horses, on flatbeds towed by tractors and packed by the score into rickety trucks, thousands of exhausted soldiers and refugees arrived in this textile town yesterday after the worst military defeat suffered by the Sarajevo government in the Bosnian war.An exodus that gathered pace through the night reached full force after dawn, with mile after mile of muddy, weeping people pouring into Travnik...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon is investigating reports that a radar-evading F-117A Nighthawk crashed or was shot down yesterday as it participated in the fourth consecutive night of bombing runs over Yugoslavia. The Pentagon confirmed reports that the pilot has been rescued.Serbian television showed pictures of what it said was the wreckage of one of a dozen of the bat-shaped attack aircraft from Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico that was taking part in Operation Allied Force.A video of the fiery wreckage with U.S. Air Force markings was taken in Budjanovci, a village 25 miles west of Belgrade, said Serbian TV.A former F-117 pilot told The Sun that both the marking and the debris appeared to indicate a Nighthawk fighter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2001
BRUSSELS, Belgium - On his first visit to NATO headquarters as secretary of state, Colin L. Powell said yesterday that the United States agreed in principle to a "phased and conditioned" return of the Yugoslav army to a buffer zone in southern Serbia. The five-mile zone, which is adjacent to where American troops are stationed inside Kosovo, has become a major flash point between armed Albanian militants and local Serbs. The United States and NATO are concerned that the estimated 1,000 Albanians in the zone could grow into a full-blown insurgency and lead to fighting between soldiers of the Yugoslav army and the Albanian militants.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
American involvement in the Bosnian war deepened yesterday as NATO for the first time in its 44-year history engaged in hostilities and the United States for the first time in its entire history engaged in combat with Bosnian Serbian forces. As could have been predicted, it was a one-sided battle: Heat-seeking missiles fired by U.S. F-16 Falcons shot down four Galeb fighters, a type of aircraft flown by Serbia and its Bosnian Serb allies.What is a lot less predictable is how the latest escalation will affect the fragile peace process and the U.S. role in the 23-month-old conflict.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
THE HAGUE - Victim by victim, the prosecution in Slobodan Milosevic's war crimes trial is demonstrating that within hours of the start of NATO's 1999 bombing campaign the Yugoslav government began executing a comprehensive and systematic plan to expel hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanians from Kosovo. Milosevic, acting as his own lawyer, is arguing that the 800,000 Albanians who fled their homes after the bombing began March 24, 1999, did so because they were afraid of NATO bombs, not because they were terrorized by Serbian police and paramilitaries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 2001
PARIS - The United Nations war crimes tribunal at The Hague, Netherlands, has published its second indictment of the former Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic, charging him yesterday with war crimes in Croatia, including the persecution, deportation, torture and murder of civilians in 1991 and 1992. A tribunal official said the document was to be presented promptly to Milosevic in the tribunal jail, where he has been since June, awaiting trial on earlier charges that he committed war crimes in Kosovo.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2001
BRUSSELS, Belgium - On his first visit to NATO headquarters as secretary of state, Colin L. Powell said yesterday that the United States agreed in principle to a "phased and conditioned" return of the Yugoslav army to a buffer zone in southern Serbia. The five-mile zone, which is adjacent to where American troops are stationed inside Kosovo, has become a major flash point between armed Albanian militants and local Serbs. The United States and NATO are concerned that the estimated 1,000 Albanians in the zone could grow into a full-blown insurgency and lead to fighting between soldiers of the Yugoslav army and the Albanian militants.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 1999
QIREZ, Yugoslavia -- Sunday was market day here.People would come in from all over the countryside to sell their produce in stalls along the one street. Elsadet Gemajli, working in his father's blacksmith shop, four buildings up from the new school, would make sure to have plenty of horseshoes for sale. Ilmi Dobra would dish out small cups of thick coffee in his cafe, where the farmers and the townsfolk stopped to rest their feet and swap the news.It was a snug, provincial, conservative life.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The capital of Kosovo lay on the cusp yesterday, at the moment where two very different versions of itself intersected. On one street corner, Serbian police with automatic weapons. Down the street, a British armored personnel carrier.The Serbs, who have spent months terrorizing the city, were still swaggering, defiantly looking for trouble and making themselves as visible and apparent as they could as NATO troops were installing a new order.When they clashed, as they did here yesterday afternoon, it was a Serbian policeman who lay dead on the street, shot down by British paratroopers.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 23, 1999
KOSHARE, Yugoslavia -- Mortars bursting around him, the Kosovo Liberation Army commander hurried his men below the cloud line, through thickets, over streams and across a field of wildflowers, where a butterfly landed on the bloodied nose of a dead Serbian soldier.The commander, Prem Marashi, slipped an L&M cigarette between his lips and listened to the walkie-talkie static. His sunburned guerrillas cocked their Kalashnikovs, crouched in the weeds. The air exploded with bullets, then quieted as the young men stared at the body, its face blown away and hips blackened and twisted by a grenade blast.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Undeterred by calls from China and Russia to halt the bombing, U.S. and allied forces pounded targets across Yugoslavia last night as NATO leaders vowed to continue the air war until President Slobodan Milosevic agreed to meet all their demands.After relatively quiet nights of bombing after the strike on the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade late last week, NATO aircraft hit 37 targets overnight Monday and, with clearing skies, pressed their attack virtually without pause throughout yesterday and into the night, U.S. and NATO officials said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Operation Horseshoe didn't turn out the way NATO expected.NATO intelligence calculated that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic's mission against Kosovo would cut a horseshoe-shaped swath through the province, drawing in all the historical and cultural sites prized by the Serbs, according to congressional and administration officials.Both the U.S. military and the intelligence communities believed the ethnic Albanians would be forcibly removed, cast from this prime territory into other parts of the province, the officials said.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 23, 1999
KOSHARE, Yugoslavia -- Mortars bursting around him, the Kosovo Liberation Army commander hurried his men below the cloud line, through thickets, over streams and across a field of wildflowers, where a butterfly landed on the bloodied nose of a dead Serbian soldier.The commander, Prem Marashi, slipped an L&M cigarette between his lips and listened to the walkie-talkie static. His sunburned guerrillas cocked their Kalashnikovs, crouched in the weeds. The air exploded with bullets, then quieted as the young men stared at the body, its face blown away and hips blackened and twisted by a grenade blast.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS AND JONATHAN WEISMAN and MARK MATTHEWS AND JONATHAN WEISMAN,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Describing a Serbian campaign of execution, rape and burning, U.S. officials subtly shifted their position on Kosovo yesterday, arguing that President Slobodan Milosevic is losing his legitimate claim to the province in the eyes of the world.Officially, the United States and its NATO allies remain committed to the peace plan put forward in February at Rambouillet, outside Paris.This plan calls for Kosovo to enjoy substantial autonomy, though not full independence from Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- Serbian forces were positioning tanks and artillery along the Kosovo border yesterday, one day after tens of thousands of refugees vanished when the Serbs turned their convoys back from the border."
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS AND JONATHAN WEISMAN and MARK MATTHEWS AND JONATHAN WEISMAN,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Describing a Serbian campaign of execution, rape and burning, U.S. officials subtly shifted their position on Kosovo yesterday, arguing that President Slobodan Milosevic is losing his legitimate claim to the province in the eyes of the world.Officially, the United States and its NATO allies remain committed to the peace plan put forward in February at Rambouillet, outside Paris.This plan calls for Kosovo to enjoy substantial autonomy, though not full independence from Yugoslavia.
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