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December 20, 1997
A COURT in southern Serbia fined Snezana Velickovic $60 for calling Yugoslav Federation president and Serbian strong man Slobodan Milosevic a "thief and a swindler."Serbia's shattered economy consists mostly of smuggling by thug friends of the strong man. If Serbia could manage to fine every Serb who thinks what Ms. Velickovic was heard to say, it could balance the budget.Pub Date: 12/20/97@
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NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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NEWS
By George Mitrovich | August 30, 1993
THE WAR in the Balkans roars on. The bodies pile higher and higher. The hospitals have no room for the wounded. The screams of the innocent pierce the day and haunt the night.In the capitals of Europe, in the capital of our own nation, shamefully posturing politicians, devoid of any moral center, lacking the will to act, pray that their duplicity escapes us.It does not.But political posturing and hypocrisy are not new. What is new and terribly different about the war in the former Yugoslavia is the abject failure of Serbian-Americans to grasp the brutal savagery of that evil conflict and to protest Serbia's guilt.
NEWS
By Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson and Zoran Cirjakovic and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 2007
BELGRADE, Serbia -- Slobodan Milosevic's feared paramilitary commander was found guilty yesterday in the 2003 murder of pro-Western Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, an assassination that shocked the nation and damaged the cause of democratic reform. Milorad Ulemek, former head of the notorious Red Berets, his deputy and 10 other men were convicted of planning and carrying out the murder of Serbia's first democratically elected prime minister. The killing was a bid to return Milosevic's allies to power and halt Belgrade's cooperation with the war crimes tribunal at The Hague, the court said.
NEWS
By John F. Burns and John F. Burns,New York Times News Service | November 27, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- What Borislav Herak remembers most vividly about the sunny morning in late June when he and two companions gunned down 10 members of a Muslim family is the small girl, about 10, who tried to hide behind her grandmother as the three Serbian nationalist soldiers opened fire from a distance of about 10 paces."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 1993
GENEVA -- Indirectly endorsing Bosnian Muslim demands, the international mediators on Bosnia-Herzegovina said yesterday that they will not reconvene peace talks until Serbian forces withdraw from two strategic mountains overlooking Sarajevo.The Muslim-dominated Bosnian government has been boycotting the negotiations with Serbian and Croatian leaders since Aug. 1 to protest the Bosnian Serbs' seizure of Mount Igman and Mount Bjelasnica. A United Nations spokesman said Serbian forces had pulled back from Mount Bjelasnica, but were still present on Mount Igman.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- A major split in the Yugoslavian army poses a new threat to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.Diplomats said that Mr. Milosevic's policy reversal on Bosnia had created panic within the armed forces but that no single faction at this stage appeared strong enough to take charge.The split became public with a series of scandalous stories in the news media. But their tabloid flavor and entertainment value have done little to mask the seriousness of the problem, which also deepens the division between Serbs in Serbia and Serbs in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | June 12, 1994
BELGRADE -- While the southern Serbian town of Valjevo awaits an exceptional event, the country's first war crimes trial, retribution of a different kind already is being meted out to countless Serbian men who have returned from Yugoslavia's dirty wars.They have succumbed to post-traumatic stress disorder -- known popularly as "Vietnam syndrome." The luckiest suffer sleeplessness, recurring nightmares, erratic behavior and a feeling of alienation. The worst-affected are being driven to frenzies of killing and suicide.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Despite a threatened European trade embargo, Yugoslavia's warfare intensified yesterday after Croatia ordered full mobilization against the advancing federal army and a top Serbian general accused the republic of "asking for total war."Serbian guerrillas backed by federal army troops, tanks and aircraft fired shells within 10 miles of Zagreb as they closed in on the Croatian capital.The Serbian forces also pressed their attack on the strategic city of Karlovac and reached the center of Vukovar, in eastern Croatia, one of the last Croatian strongholds in a region that has been pounded by artillery for weeks.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | July 15, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- It was like a scene from Yugoslavia's bloody past.Black flags fluttered in the breeze in the shadow of the dark mountains of Ravna Gora. Hundreds of men in old-fashioned beards and Serbian hats whooped and fired pistols and automatic weapons in the air.Their rhythmic chanting -- "Kill Ustashi" and "We want war!" -- turned to thunderous cheering as their leader, "Red Duke" Vojislav Seselj, arrived to promote Chetnik commandos who had killed Croats.History is threatening to repeat itself and engulf central Yugoslavia in ethnic civil war of a type Europe thought it had seen the last of -- a war with the Red Duke's Chetniks and similar exponents of violent nationalism at its heart.
NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN,LOS ANGELES TIME | March 19, 2006
POZAREVAC, Serbia and Montenegro -- Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was buried in his hometown yesterday on a day that had the air of a political rally, with fervent crowds chanting his nickname, "Slobo," as though he were still their leader. Although more than 60,000 defiant supporters had gathered in the capital, Belgrade, earlier in the day to commemorate the former president, the burial service here in a small central Serbian town was low-key and oddly devoid of emotion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2004
LJUBLJANA, Slovenia - The United Nations mission in Kosovo and local Albanian leaders have been extensively criticized in an annual report on human rights in the internationally administered province. The report, released by a branch of the U.N. missions, says that the United Nations and the local authorities that have run Kosovo for the past five years have failed to achieve even a minimal level of protection of rights and freedoms, in particular for the province's Serbian minority. The report was published four months after thousands of ethnic Albanians took to the streets across the province to attack Serb communities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 2003
PARIS - Prosecutors at the war crimes trial of Slobodan Milosevic have produced what may prove to be crucial evidence in support of their case that the former Yugoslav president is guilty of genocide in Bosnia. A document, the first of its kind to be presented in the United Nations war crimes tribunal, is an order from the Bosnian Serb interior minister, Tomislav Kovac, instructing the special police to move into Srebrenica just days before forces under Bosnian Serb command began the execution of more than 7,000 unarmed Muslim men and boys.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2003
BELGRADE, Serbia-Montenegro - Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, a reformer who helped overthrow Slobodan Milosevic and sent him to face a war crimes trial, was assassinated outside his office in downtown Belgrade yesterday. Djindjic, who had many political enemies, was shot in the back and stomach next to his armored car. Police said he was felled by two rifle shots fired by a sniper who fled. Djindjic, 50, was pronounced dead at a hospital. Quoting officials it did not identify, the Serbian news agency Beta reported that three people had been arrested.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic was arrested and taken into custody last night, ending a tense two-day standoff. Before 4:30 a.m. local time, a five-vehicle convoy was seen whisking Milosevic from his heavily guarded villa, where he had staged his desperate last stand. A Serbian Ministry of Interior spokesman said Milosevic, who faces local corruption charges, offered no resistance and had been taken to Belgrade Central Prison Zarko Korac, Serbia's deputy prime minister, told The Sun, "We tried very hard to avoid casualties, and we succeeded."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Nothing has ever been as it seemed in Slobodan Milosevic's Yugoslavia. He was a dictator who allowed dissent, a war-maker who claimed to be a guarantor of peace, a burly man with gray hair who looked like a ward boss, dressed like a Midwestern businessman and behaved like a mobster robbing his state blind. Above all, the 59-year-old Milosevic, who viewed himself and his people as history's winners, was a loser, a man who gambled and lost vast and valuable parts of his country while hundreds of thousands of people were killed or displaced.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 12, 1993
BELGRADE -- A plan by Yugoslav leaders for a pan-Serbian parliamentary session to consider the Bosnian peace plan was rejected by Bosnian Serbs yesterday hours after it was put forward.The Yugoslav leaders proposed the unusual session as a substitute for a weekend referendum of Bosnian Serbs to decide whether to accept the plan.The meeting was called for Friday in Belgrade and would have included include the parliaments of Serbia and Montenegro, which make up the rump state of Yugoslavia, and the parliaments of the self-styled Serbian republics in Bosnia and Krajina, a Serbian enclave in Croatia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | September 20, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The war is beginning to come home to Serbia's stronghold capital.Terrorist attacks have begun here in Belgrade, which is also the capital of the united Yugoslavia. They are the only option for Croatian militants since the combined forces of Serbian nationalists and the army with its Serb-dominated officer corps are enough to keep Croatia's weaker forces tied up in breakaway Croatia.At least six bombs exploded last week in Belgrade's leading restaurants, shattering the illusory tranquillity of the previous weeks and wounding several people.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 10, 2000
WASHINGTON - So eagerly did the U.S. government seek the arrest and trial of Slobodan Milosevic on war crimes charges last year that it put a price of $5 million on the Yugoslav dictator's head and asked informants to call 1-800-HEROES1 to turn him in. That was then. These days Washington is acting as if it hopes the bounty will be redeemed in the distant future, if at all. Milosevic's fall last week has ended politics as usual not just in Belgrade but in the Western powers' stance toward the Serbian leader whom President Clinton once denounced for "feeding the flames of ethnic and religious division."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 8, 2000
BEFORE THE new year gets too old, let's just attend to some traditional year-end business, shall we? I don't believe in this "end of the century/end of the millennium" nonsense that was bandied about through all of 1999. I would point out, as letter writer Doy Prunty of Baltimore observed, that "the new century and the new millennium will begin at the stroke of midnight on December 31, 2000." Prunty also advised those skeptics who insist on counting quantities -- years, in this case -- by starting with zero instead of one that he would give them 99 cents for every buck they gave him. But let's just consider the century and millennium over as of right now. Do we really want to go through choosing the athlete of the century, the entertainer of the century and the person of the century all over again?
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