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NEWS
July 7, 1993
Fighting raged in north, central and southern Bosnia as the three factions battled for territory. Bosnian radio said MAGLAJ was intensely bombarded for the third straight day. U.N. officials said fighting appeared to have been heavy, but they have been unable to send observers.The Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic said he would seek international recognition for a Bosnian Serb republic within its present borders if the Muslims refuse to accept a confederation plan.Efforts to make progress on guaranteeing the security of safe havens for the Muslims hit fresh obstacles in SARAJEVO when Bosnian Serb and Croatian leaders pulled out of participating in the talks personally.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 1, 2008
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Thirteen years after his indictment as a war criminal, the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, shorn of the long hair and bushy beard that disguised him during his years as a fugitive, finally appeared before an international court yesterday to answer charges of genocide. Karadzic, 63, who was transferred early Wednesday from Serbia to a jail cell near here, was gaunt and unsmiling, in contrast to his years as the swaggering leader of the Bosnian Serbs, one of the men most closely associated with the horrors of the Yugoslav conflict.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
UNITED NATIONS -- Western diplomats say that President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has accepted a compromise plan for monitoring the trade embargo he has imposed on the Bosnian Serbs.In return, the diplomats told the New York Times yesterday, the Security Council will move to ease sanctions on his country as early as next week.The United States, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia -- the "contact group" of countries trying to make peace in Bosnia -- had announced that if the Serbs agreed to allow international observers to watch their borders, the economic embargo against Serbia would be progressively relaxed.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2002
LONDON - NATO gave notice yesterday to the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, the most wanted man in the Balkans: His life on the run is about to become ever more perilous. For the first time yesterday, NATO-led peacekeepers conducted an intensive and public operation directed at rooting out Karadzic, who has lived for years apparently just out of sight of international forces. The troops set off explosives, lifted carpets and even searched behind a church altar, but failed to find him. Wearing black masks and armed with assault rifles, they swept through a hamlet near Celebici in a remote corner of eastern Bosnia, seizing three caches of weapons.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
Visceral satisfaction is the one undeniable result, at least in Western circles, after NATO retaliated massively to the Bosnian Serb shelling of a Sarajevo marketplace that left 37 dead. As air assaults were continuing against Serb military positions, President Clinton termed the largest operation in alliance history an "appropriate" response to another Serb atrocity and indicated his belief it would not interfere with U.S. peace initiatives.Therein lies the test of this nervously timed initiative.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 1, 2008
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Thirteen years after his indictment as a war criminal, the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, shorn of the long hair and bushy beard that disguised him during his years as a fugitive, finally appeared before an international court yesterday to answer charges of genocide. Karadzic, 63, who was transferred early Wednesday from Serbia to a jail cell near here, was gaunt and unsmiling, in contrast to his years as the swaggering leader of the Bosnian Serbs, one of the men most closely associated with the horrors of the Yugoslav conflict.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- NATO-led peacekeepers seized yesterday four key television transmitters controlled by hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, putting his party's television station off the air because it had refused to end attacks against international organizations working in Bosnia.The troops surrounded the transmitters in an early-morning operation that came in response to broadcasts Sunday night suggesting that the United Nations war crimes tribunal is anti-Serb.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1994
ZVORNIK, Bosnia -- On the surface, it seemed like any other summer day in Zvornik. Thousands bathed in the Drina River that runs through it, cooling off from a sweltering August heat wave. Many cycled and walked over an iron footbridge to reach the best beach on the left bank.But the atmosphere is tense and paranoid. Undercurrents of uncertainty are everywhere. In the eyes, the expressions. And every conversation.Zvornik is a town divided. The left bank is in Bosnia and has been "cleansed" of its Muslim majority.
NEWS
August 6, 1994
Power, not peace, is the objective of Slobodan Milosevic as his dream of a "Greater Serbia" blows up. His every move is designed to preserve his supremacy in Belgrade even though his policies have wrecked the economy of the rump Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) and unleashed vicious ethnic wars in Bosnia and Croatia. For the international community, however, peace -- not power -- must be the goal. If that requires cynical exploitation of the loathsome Mr. Milosevic, so be it.The fact is that, in the parlance of espionage, Mr. Milosevic has been "turned."
NEWS
September 2, 1995
The answer is Slobodan Milosevic, the ex-Communist boss in Belgrade whose pursuit of a "Greater Serbia" instigated the bloody four-year civil war in neighboring Bosnia. Struggling to hold onto power, his current tactic is appeasement of the Western allies in the hope they will lift harsh U.N. economic sanctions. To that end, Mr. Milosevic abandoned the Krajina Serbs as they were sent packing by Croatian forces in mid-summer. And now, he is pulling the plug on the Bosnian Serbs after supplying them with the arms to slaughter tens of thousands of Bosnian Muslims.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2001
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina - This small town, with its pocket-size Orthodox church and tatty cafes, is Karadzic country: a place where indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic has long been viewed as a native son, a savior, a saint. But even here, where the Bosnian Serb leader lived at the height of his power during his country's brutal war, there is a weariness when people talk about Karadzic - as if they love him but are almost too tired to defend him. That matters, because Pale is a place where people generally see the 1992-1995 war through an exclusively Serbian lens, one in which the Serbs are the biggest victims and not the perpetrators of "ethnic cleansing" against Bosnia's Muslims.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- NATO-led peacekeepers seized yesterday four key television transmitters controlled by hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, putting his party's television station off the air because it had refused to end attacks against international organizations working in Bosnia.The troops surrounded the transmitters in an early-morning operation that came in response to broadcasts Sunday night suggesting that the United Nations war crimes tribunal is anti-Serb.
NEWS
September 2, 1995
The answer is Slobodan Milosevic, the ex-Communist boss in Belgrade whose pursuit of a "Greater Serbia" instigated the bloody four-year civil war in neighboring Bosnia. Struggling to hold onto power, his current tactic is appeasement of the Western allies in the hope they will lift harsh U.N. economic sanctions. To that end, Mr. Milosevic abandoned the Krajina Serbs as they were sent packing by Croatian forces in mid-summer. And now, he is pulling the plug on the Bosnian Serbs after supplying them with the arms to slaughter tens of thousands of Bosnian Muslims.
NEWS
August 31, 1995
Visceral satisfaction is the one undeniable result, at least in Western circles, after NATO retaliated massively to the Bosnian Serb shelling of a Sarajevo marketplace that left 37 dead. As air assaults were continuing against Serb military positions, President Clinton termed the largest operation in alliance history an "appropriate" response to another Serb atrocity and indicated his belief it would not interfere with U.S. peace initiatives.Therein lies the test of this nervously timed initiative.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | August 15, 1995
In addition to creating more than 100,000 Serb refugees, the Croatian victory in Krajina and Bihac returned to Croatia most of the territory seized by Serb forces in 1991, broke the siege of Bihac and exacerbated power struggles inside the ruling elites of the states of former Yugoslavia. These have been so complex it takes a score card to follow them. Here is a rudimentary guide.Milosevic vs. Karadzic:The split widens between Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic and Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, the fanatical psychiatrist who created a Bosnian-Serb ''parliament'' and rump government based in Pale from which he has mounted a political as well as military challenge to the government of Bosnia-Herzegovenia, headed by Alija Izetbegovic.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
UNITED NATIONS -- Western diplomats say that President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has accepted a compromise plan for monitoring the trade embargo he has imposed on the Bosnian Serbs.In return, the diplomats told the New York Times yesterday, the Security Council will move to ease sanctions on his country as early as next week.The United States, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia -- the "contact group" of countries trying to make peace in Bosnia -- had announced that if the Serbs agreed to allow international observers to watch their borders, the economic embargo against Serbia would be progressively relaxed.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1994
GENEVA -- U.S. Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher and his fellow foreign ministers said they did not expect immediate results from their new peace plan for Bosnia-Herzegovina -- and yesterday, they were proved right.Bosnian Muslim leaders denounced the proposal from the United States, Russia and the European Union as legitimizing the Serbs' conquests, and they said a proposed four-month cease-fire is too long.Bosnian Serbs said the cease-fire is too short and also showed no sign of embracing the allies' terms for a negotiated settlement.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | August 28, 1994
BELGRADE -- The rebel Bosnian Serbs are holding yet another referendum this weekend on yet another peace plan advanced by the international community. There is little doubt that their answer will be a resounding rejection.Just how many Bosnian Serbs will take part in the balloting remains uncertain, but Serbian news reports relayed by Reuters said that some 50 percent of the population had cast their votes by midafternoon yesterday. Almost a third of their 1.9 million population is said to be in Serbia -- as refugees or temporary residents.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1994
ZVORNIK, Bosnia -- On the surface, it seemed like any other summer day in Zvornik. Thousands bathed in the Drina River that runs through it, cooling off from a sweltering August heat wave. Many cycled and walked over an iron footbridge to reach the best beach on the left bank.But the atmosphere is tense and paranoid. Undercurrents of uncertainty are everywhere. In the eyes, the expressions. And every conversation.Zvornik is a town divided. The left bank is in Bosnia and has been "cleansed" of its Muslim majority.
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