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NEWS
July 28, 1993
Direct talks between the three warring sides opened in GENEVA. There was no word on how long the talks were likely to last.As the meeting convened, Serb forces intensified their assault around the capital, SARAJEVO, and the northern town of BRCKO. A French peacekeeping unit was caught in a barrage at the capital, but it was unclear if it was deliberately targeted.NATO was still waiting for the United Nations to give the green light to provide air cover for U.N. forces in Bosnia. A NATO spokesman in BRUSSELS said the planes were ready to go.In Croatia, the U.N. military commander in former Yugoslavia said Croatian forces were burning houses and crops before withdrawing from the MASLENICA bridge region under a mediated accord with rebel Serbs.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- They had no choice but to spend the night outside a warehouse off the highway in Korisa, Haxhere Palushi said yesterday. There were 700 Albanian refugees like her, and Serb soldiers herded them all inside the building's iron outer gates, promising they would be allowed to leave Kosovo the next day. Then, she said, one soldier clicked the gate shut with a padlock. "One young guy said, `Why did they lock us in? Something is happening,' " she said. A few hours later, just before midnight on May 13, NATO planes again bombed the village, in southern Kosovo, killing what Serb officials and survivors say were more than 80 Albanian refugees.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- They had no choice but to spend the night outside a warehouse off the highway in Korisa, Haxhere Palushi said yesterday. There were 700 Albanian refugees like her, and Serb soldiers herded them all inside the building's iron outer gates, promising they would be allowed to leave Kosovo the next day. Then, she said, one soldier clicked the gate shut with a padlock. "One young guy said, `Why did they lock us in? Something is happening,' " she said. A few hours later, just before midnight on May 13, NATO planes again bombed the village, in southern Kosovo, killing what Serb officials and survivors say were more than 80 Albanian refugees.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 29, 1999
PARIS -- Serbs, with some honorable exceptions, seem unable to concede that the cause of their war with NATO is not the goals they have for the Serbian nation, but how they have gone about getting what they want.The Western powers have defended Kosovo autonomy, not its independence. They have now set peace terms that logically imply independence -- withdrawal of all Serb forces and installation of a foreign troop presence -- because President Slobodan Milosevic's program to expel ethnic Albanians from Kosovo has left them no alternative.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
UNITED NATIONS -- Western diplomats say that President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has accepted a compromise plan for monitoring the trade embargo he has imposed on the Bosnian Serbs.In return, the diplomats told the New York Times yesterday, the Security Council will move to ease sanctions on his country as early as next week.The United States, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia -- the "contact group" of countries trying to make peace in Bosnia -- had announced that if the Serbs agreed to allow international observers to watch their borders, the economic embargo against Serbia would be progressively relaxed.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | April 29, 1999
PARIS -- Serbs, with some honorable exceptions, seem unable to concede that the cause of their war with NATO is not the goals they have for the Serbian nation, but how they have gone about getting what they want.The Western powers have defended Kosovo autonomy, not its independence. They have now set peace terms that logically imply independence -- withdrawal of all Serb forces and installation of a foreign troop presence -- because President Slobodan Milosevic's program to expel ethnic Albanians from Kosovo has left them no alternative.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is close to achieving his goal of wiping out armed resistance in Kosovo, pushing out a significant number of ethnic Albanians and forcing U.S. and NATO officials to focus on driving Serbian forces from the province.Having failed to deter the Yugoslav army's campaign of repression in Kosovo, NATO forces will concentrate on weakening Milosevic's war machine with airstrikes to the point where Yugoslav military leaders demand that he permit a retreat from the province, a NATO diplomat said yesterday.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
THE WEST will not permit another Bosnia in Serbia's Kosovo province, German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel said. Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia's strongman, is sure that it will. Germany's interest is to prevent many thousands of ethnic Albanian refugees from flooding Central Europe. Mr. Milosevic knows that NATO has estimated that 20,000 troops would be needed just to seal Albania's border with Kosovo, never mind occupy Kosovo, and that no country is volunteering them.Kosovo is essential to Serb nationalism; it represents the original Serbia, site of the battle lost to the Turks in 1389.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States accused Serbia yesterday of acting as an "aggressor" in trying to seize control of large parts of neighboring Bosnia-Herzegovina and considered new steps to isolate the Bel- grade government as an international pariah.Among options is the reduction, downgrading or removal altogether of U.S. diplomatic representation in Belgrade, officials said.The new pressure reflects the growing importance of the Yugoslav conflict in the eyes of U.S. policy-makers. Content for months to take a back seat to the European Community as the Yugoslav federation fell apart, officials now see a stronger U.S. role as important in showing a continuing commitment to European security.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- NATO warned the Bosnian Serbs yesterday that if they did not accelerate the withdrawal of heavy weapons ringing Sarajevo in the next 24 hours, attacks by NATO warplanes and missile strikes on Serbian positions would resume.United Nations officials said the Bosnian Serbs had withdrawn only a dozen artillery pieces and tanks from the heights overlooking the city, despite promises made Thursday to pull out some 200 heavy weapons in exchange for an end to NATO air attacks on Serbian positions.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is close to achieving his goal of wiping out armed resistance in Kosovo, pushing out a significant number of ethnic Albanians and forcing U.S. and NATO officials to focus on driving Serbian forces from the province.Having failed to deter the Yugoslav army's campaign of repression in Kosovo, NATO forces will concentrate on weakening Milosevic's war machine with airstrikes to the point where Yugoslav military leaders demand that he permit a retreat from the province, a NATO diplomat said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- NATO widened its attacks on Kosovo, focusing aircraft and cruise missiles for the first time against Serbian army troops and police units that have intensified their violence against ethnic Albanians. Thousands more refugees, most of them women and children, streamed into Albania and Macedonia and told grim accounts of killings, rapes and burned villages, refugees and officials reported. Despite the escalating humanitarian crisis, U.S. and NATO officials reiterated yesterday that there were no plans to send NATO ground troops into the region to try to stop Serbian aggression.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- By the middle of this month, thousands of U.S. soldiers could be sent to the strife-torn Yugoslav province of Kosovo and remain for years as part of a NATO peacekeeping force of up to 35,000 soldiers whose duties and duration are only in the vague planning stage.Officials acknowledge that the plan could go terribly wrong: The Serbs could refuse to cooperate and could, as a consequence, be bombed. Kosovo's ethnic Albanian rebels -- the Kosovo Liberation Army -- could prove so intransigent that they would be left at the mercy of the Serbs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1998
BELACEVAC, Yugoslavia -- Thousands of Serbian special police units and troops, backed by artillery and tanks, opened a series of attacks against separatist rebel positions yesterday.Armored personnel carriers unleashed volleys at trenches and checkpoints held by lightly armed Kosovo Liberation Army guerrillas in the mining town of Belacevac, six miles west of Pristina, the provincial capital. Serbian gunners also attacked Lapushnik, where rebels have barricaded the main road from Pristina to Pec, cutting off the Serb-held town of Kijevo for seven weeks.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
THE WEST will not permit another Bosnia in Serbia's Kosovo province, German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel said. Slobodan Milosevic, Serbia's strongman, is sure that it will. Germany's interest is to prevent many thousands of ethnic Albanian refugees from flooding Central Europe. Mr. Milosevic knows that NATO has estimated that 20,000 troops would be needed just to seal Albania's border with Kosovo, never mind occupy Kosovo, and that no country is volunteering them.Kosovo is essential to Serb nationalism; it represents the original Serbia, site of the battle lost to the Turks in 1389.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 3, 1998
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- Kosovo descended further yesterday into a level of violence that many Western governments have long feared could trigger a greater Balkan war.According to reports from various sources, heavily armed Serbian military and police units under the control of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic cut a swath of destruction through the town of Decani and 10 surrounding villages near the Albanian border. The area is home to 65,000 mostly ethnic Albanians.The Serbian campaign appeared to be aimed at quashing the separatist movement of ethnic Albanians in Serbia's once autonomous province.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 17, 1995
ZAGREB, Croatia -- NATO warned the Bosnian Serbs yesterday that if they did not accelerate the withdrawal of heavy weapons ringing Sarajevo in the next 24 hours, attacks by NATO warplanes and missile strikes on Serbian positions would resume.United Nations officials said the Bosnian Serbs had withdrawn only a dozen artillery pieces and tanks from the heights overlooking the city, despite promises made Thursday to pull out some 200 heavy weapons in exchange for an end to NATO air attacks on Serbian positions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
UNITED NATIONS -- Western diplomats say that President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has accepted a compromise plan for monitoring the trade embargo he has imposed on the Bosnian Serbs.In return, the diplomats told the New York Times yesterday, the Security Council will move to ease sanctions on his country as early as next week.The United States, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia -- the "contact group" of countries trying to make peace in Bosnia -- had announced that if the Serbs agreed to allow international observers to watch their borders, the economic embargo against Serbia would be progressively relaxed.
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