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November 29, 2005
Services for Allisha Sequoia Coleman, a senior at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Jones Tabernacle Baptist Church, 2100 W. Baltimore St. Miss Coleman, who was 22, died in an accident Nov. 22 when a car in which she was riding ran off Interstate 97 near Glen Burnie. She was returning home from school for Thanksgiving. Born in Baltimore, she was raised on West Lexington Street. She was a 2001 graduate of Seton Keough High School, where she was a cheerleader.
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BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
It's called "bootstrapping," as in pulling yourself up by the proverbial bootstraps, and Mark Wesker is a pro at it - enough to know that he doesn't want to do it again. In the early 1990s, he and a partner had to use creative self-help methods to build Sequoia Software Corp., a fledgling business founded in the basement of a Columbia townhouse. They maxed their credit cards, used their homes as collateral and bought computer equipment only to return it days later after impressing potential clients, who often turned out to hold more power than the company's founders when determining Sequoia's direction.
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BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
Sequoia Software Corp. of Columbia announced yesterday that it has purchased Radian Systems Inc. of Arlington, Va., for an undisclosed amount of stock and cash.Privately held Sequoia makes Web-based software to manage corporate information using the computer language XML. Radian makes software that converts data into XML."Putting the two products together is a powerful solution," said Sequoia Chief Executive Officer Richard C. Faint Jr.Faint said the companies entered into a business partnership this year and began planning the acquisition in May. In October, Sequoia will release new software, Sequoia XML Portal, that will combine the two companies' products, he said.
NEWS
November 29, 2005
Services for Allisha Sequoia Coleman, a senior at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at Jones Tabernacle Baptist Church, 2100 W. Baltimore St. Miss Coleman, who was 22, died in an accident Nov. 22 when a car in which she was riding ran off Interstate 97 near Glen Burnie. She was returning home from school for Thanksgiving. Born in Baltimore, she was raised on West Lexington Street. She was a 2001 graduate of Seton Keough High School, where she was a cheerleader.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2000
Sequoia Software Corp., the Columbia-based designer of Internet software that went public earlier this year, announced yesterday that Lockheed Martin Corp. has signed on to sell Sequoia products. The deal, whose value was not disclosed, was the latest in a flurry of announcements Sequoia has made during the past month. Sequoia executives say the company is poised for takeoff as the market its software serves really begins to gel. "As our CEO says, we're the right company in the right place at the right time.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
Sequoia Software Corp., the fast-growing, Columbia-based designer of Internet software, reported third-quarter results yesterday that were better than analysts expected. For the three months that ended Sept. 30, Sequoia posted a net loss of $4.2 million, equal to 14 cents per share. In the corresponding period last year, the company had a loss of $3.8 million, or 64 cents a share. Per-share figures for the most recent quarter reflect higher weighted average shares outstanding as a result of the company's initial public offering of 4.2 million shares this year.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
Columbia-based Sequoia Software Inc. braved a brutal IPO market yesterday, raising $32 million in its initial public offering. Shares took a 25 percent bounce on the first day of trading, opening at $8 and closing at $10.0625. The company had trimmed back the pricing of its shares before the offering in the face of waning investor enthusiasm for new technology issues."We're thrilled with the reception we got, given the environment," said Sequoia Software Chief Executive Officer Richard C. Faint Jr. "We got a full offering out the door even though it's a very difficult market for IPOs."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1997
Armed with a federal advanced-technology award of nearly $2 million, Columbia's Sequoia Software is attempting to solve the vexing problem of creating a national "master patient index."The index would help a doctor treating a patient to find and read other records related to that patient, even if they are stored on the incompatible computer systems of a hospital, lab or another doctor.The 40-employee firm, which is No. 15 on the "Fast 50" list based on revenue growth among high-tech companies in Maryland, hopes to double in size by the end of next year, both with the patient index problem and to handle other growth.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON and BILL ATKINSON,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1995
Harbor Federal Savings Bank has reached an agreement to buy three branches from Bethesda's Sequoia National Bank, the savings and loan said yesterday.The Towson-based thrift will pick up $45 million in deposits and offices in Pikesville, Perry Hall and Baltimore, which will boost its branch network to nine.The thrift also acquired $21 million in loans in the deal and about eight employees, most of whom will be retained, said Robert A. Williams, Harbor Federal's president."We really wanted" the branches, Mr. Williams said.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1999
Sequoia Software Corp., an Internet software company based in Columbia, will announce next week that it has secured $33 million in new venture capital, the largest investment in its eight-year history and the latest step in its plans to go public in 2000.Company officials said Sequoia will use the investment to bolster its sales and marketing campaigns and to develop its primary software product, Sequoia XML Portal Server.The financing comes mostly from venture capital funds, but also from individuals, including Sequoia Chief Executive Officer Richard C. Faint Jr.Privately held Sequoia plans a public stock offering sometime next year, "market willing," said Faint.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
Sourcefire Inc., the Columbia supplier of network security systems, is expected to announced today that it has raised $15 million in a third round of investment financing, led by Sequoia Capital. Sequoia Capital is a Silicon Valley venture capital firm that has seeded such tech successes as Cisco Systems and Apple Computer. Chief Technology Officer Martin Roesch founded Sourcefire three years ago in his Carroll County living room. He is best known in technology circles as the author of Snort, the most widely used network intrusion detection system in the world.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2002
In another measure of the speed of technology's fall, 100 people in Columbia were laid off yesterday just 16 months after a Florida company paid $184.6 million in cash to buy their company. Citrix Systems Inc. announced yesterday that it is closing the former offices of Sequoia Software Corp., whose three investors made millions when they sold to Citrix in March 2001 as they sensed the sector was starting to crater. Citrix will pay two months in severance to about 100 employees being laid off, a source said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
For 60 years, Miriam Konigsberg has watched her Ashburton neighbors come and go. She saw the waves of white Anglo-Saxon Protestants leaving when Jewish families began to move in, and another exodus when blacks began to buy homes. This weekend, past and present residents of the tree-lined Northwest Baltimore neighborhood plan to gather across racial and religious lines for a reunion. At a recent block party, Konigsberg, a 92-year-old Jewish woman, spoke to her neighbors of what she had seen since 1941: "When we moved in, Ashburton was all Christian, and it didn't take long for them to run away from `the Jews.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
Mark Wesker and his partners in Sequoia Software Corp. had little money for a presentation to impress a potential client. Their solution in 1994, after they maxed out their credit cards to finance the business: Buy some fancy equipment from Computer City in Columbia, which offered a 30-day money-back policy, use it for their presentation, then return it for a full refund. That was then. This week, they will become multimillionaires when Citrix Systems Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. acquires their company for $184.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2001
In the Region Commerce approves expansion of city's foreign trade zone Baltimore's Foreign Trade Zone No. 74 has been approved for a major expansion by the Foreign-Trade Zones Board of the U.S. Commerce Department, the Baltimore Development Corp. announced yesterday. Foreign-trade zones are seen as catalysts for international commerce because of the breaks they can offer on tariffs or excise taxes. The local foreign trade zone - previously 286 acres - now is composed of 1,464 acres at 11 sites, said the BDC, the city economic development agency that also operates the trade zone.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
The day after the Super Bowl, executives of Sequoia Software Inc. traveled from Columbia to South Florida at the invitation of Citrix Systems Inc., which was entertaining licensees of its software products. Seven weeks later, after a conversation that began at that event, the companies are more than friends: Citrix announced yesterday that it is buying the Maryland company for $184.6 million in cash. Sequoia, which employs 240 people, will continue in Columbia under the name of its new parent, officials of both companies said.
TRAVEL
By Eric Noland and Eric Noland,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | May 28, 2000
At the new Wuksachi Lodge in Sequoia National Park, a musty book is tucked in among the reading selections in the lobby: "Hammonds' Illustrated Nature Guide." It doesn't appear to get much attention from guests, probably because of its age -- it was published in 1955. Look up the tree species for which this park in California's western Sierra Nevada is famed and you'll read this entry: "For how many centuries or millennia our present sequoias will go on living nobody knows; their chances seem excellent as they are almost indestructible."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
Mark Wesker and his partners in Sequoia Software Corp. had little money for a presentation to impress a potential client. Their solution in 1994, after they maxed out their credit cards to finance the business: Buy some fancy equipment from Computer City in Columbia, which offered a 30-day money-back policy, use it for their presentation, then return it for a full refund. That was then. This week, they will become multimillionaires when Citrix Systems Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. acquires their company for $184.
NEWS
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,NIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 24, 2000
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The tree arrived in a little box and without fanfare close to four decades ago, a seedling given by a brother in California to his sister here. For years it grew in a pot until Cary Ellen Howie decided, finally, it was big enough to go in the ground. And there it is today, rising gracefully to 51 feet, about five stories tall, in her backyard. In a city filled with pines, poplars and oaks soaring to 100 feet and higher, one might not think twice about a tree half that height.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
Sequoia Software Corp., the fast-growing, Columbia-based designer of Internet software, reported third-quarter results yesterday that were better than analysts expected. For the three months that ended Sept. 30, Sequoia posted a net loss of $4.2 million, equal to 14 cents per share. In the corresponding period last year, the company had a loss of $3.8 million, or 64 cents a share. Per-share figures for the most recent quarter reflect higher weighted average shares outstanding as a result of the company's initial public offering of 4.2 million shares this year.
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