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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
There's something subtly different about the Maryland license plates being issued for passenger cars these days. Gone is the familiar sequence of three letters and three numbers (ABC 123). Since late last year, the Motor Vehicle Administration has been handing out plates that start with a number, followed by three letters and two numbers (1AB C23). What happened? The MVA ran out of numbers in the old sequence, which began in 1986 with license plate NAA 001 and ended last fall with MZZ 999. Betty Rabbitt, the MVA's assistant manager of vehicle services, said a few cars are still on the road with tags starting with N, so the sequence can't repeat itself.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
Rivals in the sometimes acrimonious race to sequence the human genome are working together to unravel the genomic software powering the rat, an animal often used as a model to help understand disease in people, the National Institutes of Health announced yesterday. Celera Genomics Group, which recently published its human genome sequence in the journal Science, and the Baylor College of Medicine, a key sequencing center for the rival publicly funded project that published in Nature, have been awarded two new grants totaling $58.5 million to help sequence the rat. The awards, $21 million of which will go to Celera over the next two fiscal years, are meant to speed up a publicly funded rat DNA-sequencing project begun at the end of the 1999 fiscal year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
A voice called out, "Cameras ready. " Another voice responded, "Sound. " Then a third: "Action. " With that, the Everyman Theatre Film Studios came to life one recent morning. OK, not a real film studio, but awfully close. An upstairs space at Everyman's Fayette Street building was transformed into a genuine movie-producing facility as part of the process of putting the company's next production onto the stage. "By the Way, Meet Vera Stark," a comic/serious work from 2011 by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Lynn Nottage, is receiving its Baltimore/Washington premiere.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
As the ninth-graders peered into two mirrors they had taped together to study reflections, their assignment seemed simple enough: Using one pencil as their object, count the number of pencils that appear in the mirrors from various angles. Marco Alvarez and Ashley Ponton gradually decreased the angle of the mirrors from 67 degrees to 32 degrees, as physics teacher Joel Weiss had instructed, to better visualize the concepts of angle of reflection and angle of incidence. At 67 degrees, they counted five pencils.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 3, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Nearly everyone involved in the making of a film bemoans a favorite scene that ends up on the cutting-room floor. We asked some film makers associated with a handful of 1990 movies to tell us about the outtakes they most remember -- or regret.The rough cut of Orion Pictures' "Dances With Wolves" -- the story of a U.S. soldier befriended by a tribe of Sioux Indians fighting for survival against invading whites -- came in at over five hours, and two hours had to be chopped. Film editor Neil Travis had no trouble picking the scene he and director-producer-star Kevin Costner would have most liked to save.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- For the first time, the entire DNA sequence of a free-living organism has been deciphered, displaying an entire set of the genes needed for life, two scientists announced Wednesday night.The sequence is a chain of 1,830,121 DNA bases, the chemical units of the genetic code, which constitute the full genetic data base of a bacterium, Hemophilus influenzae.The result, announced at a meeting of the American Society for Microbiology here, is a personal triumph for Dr. J. Craig Venter, the scientist who led the sequencing work.
NEWS
April 1, 2006
I'm just amazed there are people who want to be known for looking like the Simpsons." - AL JEAN, executive producer of "The Simpsons," on a live-action opening sequence filmed for the animated show [SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL]
NEWS
November 29, 2009
This musical cantata will be presented at 6 p.m. Dec. 13 at Glen Burnie Baptist Church, 7524 Old Stage Road. The cantata takes a look not only the birth of Jesus, but also the sequence of events leading up to it. Free. For more information, call 410-766-2588.
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEPHEN HUNTER | January 25, 1991
The Senator is bringing back that old proto-music video "Fantasia" in a restored version for two weeks, starting today.The original 1940 production featured a full-frame 1:37 ratio, a multichannel stereo soundtrack and an intermission. These features have been re-created for the showing on the 900-seat theater's big screen, but this restored version will also be screened in 70 millimeter for enhanced depth and detail.Additionally, the screenings at the Senator will feature a 1940 newsreel for an added sense of milieu.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 10, 2013
Who really knows whether New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi had a legitimate gripe when he called out Orioles coach Bobby Dickerson for allegedly stealing signs on Monday night, but thanks to Buck Showalter's mad dash onto the field at the end of the first inning, we're all getting a crash course in baseball's dark art. Let's not be naïve. The reason each team has a complex system of signs to call pitches and various other plays is because it is understood that anybody worth two bags of Red Man is looking for an edge and isn't going to go to bed with a guilty conscience for cracking that code.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
U.S. Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was on to her third set of doctors when she visited the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having been told the fetus she was carrying was developing without kidneys and would be unable to breathe on its own after birth. But in Baltimore, her doctors stumbled into what is considered an unproven treatment for a condition known as Potter's Sequence, the diagnosis her fetus was given, involving low levels of amniotic fluid. Herrera Beutler underwent a series of injections of saline solution into her uterus at Hopkins to raise the fluid levels, key for normal fetal development.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- As the competition for the Orioles' fifth rotation spot begins to heat up, right-hander Jake Arrieta made his case Saturday afternoon, throwing 4 2/3 shutout innings in a 3-1 win over the Toronto Blue Jays at Florida Auto Exchange Stadium. Arrieta, last year's Opening Day starter, said his ability to mix his pitches Saturday was the best "since I can remember.” “Today was the best sequence day I've had from start to finish in a long time, not just the spring, but since I can remember,” Arrieta said.
NEWS
November 29, 2009
This musical cantata will be presented at 6 p.m. Dec. 13 at Glen Burnie Baptist Church, 7524 Old Stage Road. The cantata takes a look not only the birth of Jesus, but also the sequence of events leading up to it. Free. For more information, call 410-766-2588.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2008
Ballet Theatre of Maryland launched its 30th anniversary season - and its most successful opener ever - with a sizable audience Saturday for the opening performance of Cinderella and a sold-out show Sunday at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. The draw was a sparkling choreographic recreation of the fairy tale favorite by BTM artistic director Dianna Cuatto. Clearly relishing the project, Cuatto explained that she had "combined the best parts of favorite versions including Ever After, Disney, Rodgers and Hammerstein and others to create this version of the beloved tale."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 14, 2008
This morning marks the year's earliest sunrise. Sleepers wish it were later, but Old Sol popped above the eastern horizon at 5:39 a.m. EDT as seen from Baltimore (5:36 at Ocean City, 5:40 in Oakland). The summer solstice is early this year, at 7:59 p.m. on the 19th, and the latest sunset falls on the 27th, at 8:39 p.m. The sequence reverses in December, beginning with the earliest sunset on Dec. 7, the winter solstice on Dec. 21, and the latest sunrise Jan. 5.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 14, 2008
This morning marks the year's earliest sunrise. Sleepers wish it were later, but Old Sol popped above the eastern horizon at 5:39 a.m. EDT as seen from Baltimore (5:36 at Ocean City, 5:40 in Oakland). The summer solstice is early this year, at 7:59 p.m. on the 19th, and the latest sunset falls on the 27th, at 8:39 p.m. The sequence reverses in December, beginning with the earliest sunset on Dec. 7, the winter solstice on Dec. 21, and the latest sunrise Jan. 5.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Controversial director Spike Lee is calling on African-Americans to send Hollywood a message by taking a day off from work and keeping children home from school Nov. 20, when his movie "Malcolm X" opens."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun reporter | May 12, 2007
Two-way traffic on the westbound span of the Bay Bridge does not appear to have been a factor in causing the seven-vehicle crash that killed three Eastern Shore residents Thursday, a top police official said yesterday. Marcus L. Brown, chief of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, said at a news conference yesterday that it might take two months to complete the investigation of the devastating chain-reaction accident -- set off when a trailer came unhitched from the sport utility vehicle that was pulling it. Yesterday, police identified the those killed in the crash as Randall R. Orff, 47, and his son, Jonathan R. Orff, 19, both of Millington in Kent County, and James H. Ingle, 44, of Preston in Caroline County.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
As the ninth-graders peered into two mirrors they had taped together to study reflections, their assignment seemed simple enough: Using one pencil as their object, count the number of pencils that appear in the mirrors from various angles. Marco Alvarez and Ashley Ponton gradually decreased the angle of the mirrors from 67 degrees to 32 degrees, as physics teacher Joel Weiss had instructed, to better visualize the concepts of angle of reflection and angle of incidence. At 67 degrees, they counted five pencils.
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