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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Every year, some 750,000 Americans develop sepsis, an extreme immune system response to infection. It kills a quarter to half of them, more than the combined number of people who die of prostate and breast cancer and AIDS, according to the National Institutes of Health. Health care providers have a limited amount of time to treat sepsis, which appears to be on the rise, possibly because of the longevity of people with chronic diseases and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Every year, some 750,000 Americans develop sepsis, an extreme immune system response to infection. It kills a quarter to half of them, more than the combined number of people who die of prostate and breast cancer and AIDS, according to the National Institutes of Health. Health care providers have a limited amount of time to treat sepsis, which appears to be on the rise, possibly because of the longevity of people with chronic diseases and spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
The family of a man who died of sepsis at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson will receive $1.44 million after a jury ruled this week that the doctor failed to provide him with proper care. The medical malpractice verdict comes several weeks after the hospital notified 169 more patients - bringing the total to 530 - that coronary stent implants they received at the hospital might have been unnecessary. Several lawsuits have been filed, and federal authorities have launched two investigations.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
The family of a man who died of sepsis at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson will receive $1.44 million after a jury ruled this week that the doctor failed to provide him with proper care. The medical malpractice verdict comes several weeks after the hospital notified 169 more patients - bringing the total to 530 - that coronary stent implants they received at the hospital might have been unnecessary. Several lawsuits have been filed, and federal authorities have launched two investigations.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
She thought it was just a cold. Her throat was sore, and she felt tired all over. But as JoAnn Barr got her son ready for school that morning in March, she started gasping for breath. Within a few hours, Barr was on a ventilator in intensive care, her blood pressure bottoming out, her kidneys failing. For a month, the 41-year-old Westminster woman hovered near death, a victim of the fast-moving, often-lethal condition known as sepsis. It's an illness that rages through the victim's bloodstream, unleashing a fury of reactions that kill tissues and shut down organs.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 19, 1994
Synergen's stock price plunged nearly 50 percent yesterday, and the future of the once high-flying biotechnology company fell into doubt, after the company said it was halting human trials of its flagship drug for the treatment of sepsis, an often-fatal kind of bacterial infection.Synergen's announcement followed a series of disappointments for other biotechnology drugs in recent months that have contributed to a protracted bear market for biotech stocks.The Boulder, Colo.-based company said it would discontinue development of the drug Antril because an interim review of data showed that the drug failed to save the lives of patients infected with the disease.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | February 14, 1991
An experimental drug has been shown to significantly reduce deaths caused by a bacterial infection so severe it kills as many as 60 percent of those who contract it, according to a clinical study that was to be published today.The drug, known as Centoxin, reduced by 39 percent the number of deaths attributed to a blood infection known as gram-negative sepsis, said a team of researchers writing in the New England Journal of Medicine.For those patients who went into septic shock -- a complication of gram-negative sepsis that kills as many as 75 percent of its victims -- the drug reduced mortality by 42 percent.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
The biotech industry held its breath yesterday, waiting fo investors' reaction to the second major announcement by Centocor Inc. in a year that its leading product is in trouble.Centocor said yesterday that tests of Centoxin showed a higher death rate in some patients taking the drug than in those who did not. Its stock dropped 65 percent after the company halted the sale of its anti-sepsis product in Europe and stopped U.S. testing. The drug has not been approved in this country.In March, when the company announced that the Food and Drug Administration was questioning the way in which tests had been conducted, biotech stock prices dropped dramatically and investor confidence in the industry collapsed.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
Despite marketing problems with its allergy diagnostic tests, BioWhittaker Inc. is working on three new products that the company predicts could eventually double its revenues.The Frederick County company also expects to see continued growth in the sale of its existing products, particularly in Europe, where it is building a manufacturing facility. It has also established a partnership with a major German health care company, BioWhittaker Chairman Joseph W. Alibrandi said yesterday at the annual meeting of shareholders in Walkersville.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 2004
Rewarming patients after surgery Most patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery are placed on heart-lung machines that cool their blood to reduce their bodies' oxygen needs. Now researchers have found that taking an extra 10 to 15 minutes to slowly rewarm patients at the end of their surgery reduces brain overheating, lowering the risk of brain damage and memory loss. Researchers from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., showed several years ago that patients given an extra 10 to 12 minutes to bring their body temperatures back up scored nearly one-third better on standard cognition tests six weeks after surgery.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 2004
Rewarming patients after surgery Most patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery are placed on heart-lung machines that cool their blood to reduce their bodies' oxygen needs. Now researchers have found that taking an extra 10 to 15 minutes to slowly rewarm patients at the end of their surgery reduces brain overheating, lowering the risk of brain damage and memory loss. Researchers from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., showed several years ago that patients given an extra 10 to 12 minutes to bring their body temperatures back up scored nearly one-third better on standard cognition tests six weeks after surgery.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 2003
IT WAS the second semester of freshman year at Salve Regina University in Newport, R.I., and John Kach, then 18, and a member of the basketball team, was in great shape. Until one night, when he developed a fever of 104 to 105 Fahrenheit and flu-like symptoms. His girlfriend wanted to take him to the hospital, but he said no. After all, Kach was a guy and, as he puts it, "a guy's not going to go to the hospital for a high fever." But by 5 a.m., he was fading in and out of consciousness.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
She thought it was just a cold. Her throat was sore, and she felt tired all over. But as JoAnn Barr got her son ready for school that morning in March, she started gasping for breath. Within a few hours, Barr was on a ventilator in intensive care, her blood pressure bottoming out, her kidneys failing. For a month, the 41-year-old Westminster woman hovered near death, a victim of the fast-moving, often-lethal condition known as sepsis. It's an illness that rages through the victim's bloodstream, unleashing a fury of reactions that kill tissues and shut down organs.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 19, 1994
Synergen's stock price plunged nearly 50 percent yesterday, and the future of the once high-flying biotechnology company fell into doubt, after the company said it was halting human trials of its flagship drug for the treatment of sepsis, an often-fatal kind of bacterial infection.Synergen's announcement followed a series of disappointments for other biotechnology drugs in recent months that have contributed to a protracted bear market for biotech stocks.The Boulder, Colo.-based company said it would discontinue development of the drug Antril because an interim review of data showed that the drug failed to save the lives of patients infected with the disease.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1993
BG&E refinances bondsBaltimore Gas and Electric Co. yesterday sold $125 million worth of 6.625 percent bonds to an underwriting group led by Morgan Stanley & Co.The proceeds, along with $25 million from an earlier bond sale, will be used to redeem $150 million worth of bonds paying 8.25 percent and 8.375 percent. The refinancing will save BG&E $28.4 million during the next 14 1/2 years, a spokesman said.Synergen shares drop sharplyShares of Synergen Inc. slipped sharply again yesterday after the company said it would not file a U.S. marketing application for its Antril sepsis drug until a follow-up trial is completed.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
Despite marketing problems with its allergy diagnostic tests, BioWhittaker Inc. is working on three new products that the company predicts could eventually double its revenues.The Frederick County company also expects to see continued growth in the sale of its existing products, particularly in Europe, where it is building a manufacturing facility. It has also established a partnership with a major German health care company, BioWhittaker Chairman Joseph W. Alibrandi said yesterday at the annual meeting of shareholders in Walkersville.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1993
BG&E refinances bondsBaltimore Gas and Electric Co. yesterday sold $125 million worth of 6.625 percent bonds to an underwriting group led by Morgan Stanley & Co.The proceeds, along with $25 million from an earlier bond sale, will be used to redeem $150 million worth of bonds paying 8.25 percent and 8.375 percent. The refinancing will save BG&E $28.4 million during the next 14 1/2 years, a spokesman said.Synergen shares drop sharplyShares of Synergen Inc. slipped sharply again yesterday after the company said it would not file a U.S. marketing application for its Antril sepsis drug until a follow-up trial is completed.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
Genox is new tenant at business incubatorGenox Corp. is one of the new technology companies at the South Harbor Business Incubator on Key Highway.Genox is developing diagnostic tests to measure oxidative stress, which has been correlated with cardiovascular disease, cancer and cataracts. The company believes oxidative stress someday will be measured routinely, like cholesterol, so a person's diet can be adjusted to lower the risk of disease.The company, founded in 1991 in Minnesota, moved to the incubator recently to be closer to federal regulatory agencies.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
Genox is new tenant at business incubatorGenox Corp. is one of the new technology companies at the South Harbor Business Incubator on Key Highway.Genox is developing diagnostic tests to measure oxidative stress, which has been correlated with cardiovascular disease, cancer and cataracts. The company believes oxidative stress someday will be measured routinely, like cholesterol, so a person's diet can be adjusted to lower the risk of disease.The company, founded in 1991 in Minnesota, moved to the incubator recently to be closer to federal regulatory agencies.
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