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By Los Angeles Times | October 26, 1993
TORONTO -- Canadians went to the polls yesterday and drastically redrew their country's political map, throwing out Prime Minister Kim Campbell and electing a majority Liberal Party government led by Jean Chretien, a 59-year-old French-speaking lawyer from Quebec.Voters delivered an astonishing rebuke to the Progressive Conservative Party, which has governed since 1984, first under Brian Mulroney and for the past four months under Ms. Campbell. Throughout their tenure the Conservatives have stood for hard-right economic policies, passing cuts in social spending, a new value-added tax and the North American Free Trade Agreement.
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NEWS
May 23, 2014
On Sunday, Ukrainians will go to the polls to choose a new president to replace Viktor Yanukovych, the head of government who was deposed by a popular uprising in February. Barring the possibility of a last-ditch effort to disrupt the polling by armed separatists in the eastern part of the country, or Russian meddling aimed at discrediting the results, the elections could produce a government that is recognized as legitimate by the rest of the world and representative enough of the country's various regions and political factions that all Ukrainians can have some confidence that their concerns will be addressed.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Ignoring stern warnings from the government in Jakarta, separatists in the province of West Papua made a declaration of independence yesterday, in hopes of following the lead of East Timor, which broke from Indonesia last year. About 3,000 supporters of separation gathered in what they called a "congress" this past week. Yesterday, they unanimously endorsed the declaration and called on the United Nations to recognize a new state, which it is unlikely to do. "West Papua is independent and enjoys a status of sovereignty since the 1st December of 1961," said the statement, referring to the date of the territory's independence from the Netherlands, its former colonial overlord.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | March 8, 2008
MADRID, Spain -- On the eve of national elections, an activist from Spain's ruling Socialist Party was gunned down in the Basque city of Mondragon, throwing a hard-fought political campaign into disarray. There was no claim of responsibility, but the government was quick to blame the militant Basque separatist organization ETA, which has set off a series of small bombs ahead of the vote and killed two Spanish policemen just across the border in France on Dec. 1. The group ended a cease-fire last year.
NEWS
November 1, 1995
FULLY 93 PERCENT of Quebec's eligible voters turned out for the referendum on sovereignty. They really cared. The outcome was so close -- 49.44 percent in favor but 50.56 percent opposed -- that nothing was decided.Technically, the bid failed. The procedure pledged by the Quebec government will not go forward. But the separatists' gain from a 60-40 loss 15 years ago was so great that their message is to continue. They have no incentive now to make Canada work.Separatists' view in any country is that if you lose a plebiscite, you hold it again and again until you win it, and the first win will be permanent and irreversible.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
MOSCOW -- Two pro-Kremlin officials were shot to death minutes apart yesterday in Ingushetia, a republic bordering Chechnya in Russia's volatile North Caucasus that has been destabilized by the region's separatist and Islamic insurgency. The assassinations appeared to be another round of carefully timed attacks against the government. First, an administrator responsible for helping Russian families resettle in the region was gunned down, and then a senior police commander was killed as he drove his three young children to school.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 13, 2003
MOSCOW - A truck loaded with explosives blew up near a government complex in northern Chechnya yesterday in what officials said was a terrorist attack, killing at least 41 and wounding scores in a region that had escaped the worst of Russia's war against Chechen separatists. The attack was the worst in Chechnya since Russia held a constitutional referendum there in March as part of Kremlin efforts to hasten a peaceful end to the war after 44 months of conflict. Officials said the death toll - already among the worst of the war - could rise.
NEWS
October 4, 1996
Robert Bourassa, 63, who confronted separatist violence, language disputes and Indian militancy during four stormy terms as Quebec's premier, died of skin cancer Wednesday in Montreal.Although opposed to Quebec's secession from Canada, he struggled to find a balance between federalism and Quebec nationalism.He was elected four times as Quebec's premier, serving from 1970 to 1976 and from 1985 to 1994. In 1970, at 36, he was the youngest premier ever elected.After taking power, he was plunged into Quebec's worst political crisis when Quebec Liberation Front separatists kidnapped and killed his labor minister.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
On Sunday, Ukrainians will go to the polls to choose a new president to replace Viktor Yanukovych, the head of government who was deposed by a popular uprising in February. Barring the possibility of a last-ditch effort to disrupt the polling by armed separatists in the eastern part of the country, or Russian meddling aimed at discrediting the results, the elections could produce a government that is recognized as legitimate by the rest of the world and representative enough of the country's various regions and political factions that all Ukrainians can have some confidence that their concerns will be addressed.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | November 29, 1998
Canadian elections of recent years have been compelling because so much has been hanging in the balance - the continued existence of our northern neighbor as a united country. It is hanging in the balance again, as the people of Quebec go to the polls tomorrow.In 1980 and again in 1995, Quebec separatists pushed for referendums on whether the mostly French-speaking province - with 25 percent of the country's population - should secede from mostly English-speaking Canada.Both times the separatists lost, the last time barely.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | August 24, 2006
FBI agents searched this week the office of a Cumberland physician who is president of a Sri Lankan charitable organization suspected of funneling money to the Tamil Tigers, a separatist group deemed a foreign terrorist organization by the U.S. government. The search came in the midst of a global investigation that has led to the arrests of 14 men. One group is accused of plotting to buy sophisticated weapons for the Tigers. Another group of defendants is accused of attempting to persuade State Department officials to remove the group from its terrorist list with a $1 million bribe.
NEWS
By KIM MURPHY and KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2006
MOSCOW -- The separatist Chechen leader, who had attempted to inspire an Islamic rebellion against Russia across the northern Caucasus, was killed yesterday in a gunfight with police in his hometown. The death of Abdul Khalim Sadulayev, a former Islamic court judge who took over the Chechen resistance after the death of former Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov, marks a serious blow to insurgents attempting to destabilize southern Russia and establish independence for Chechnya. "The terrorists have been virtually decapitated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 10, 2006
MOSCOW -- Two pro-Kremlin officials were shot to death minutes apart yesterday in Ingushetia, a republic bordering Chechnya in Russia's volatile North Caucasus that has been destabilized by the region's separatist and Islamic insurgency. The assassinations appeared to be another round of carefully timed attacks against the government. First, an administrator responsible for helping Russian families resettle in the region was gunned down, and then a senior police commander was killed as he drove his three young children to school.
NEWS
By TRACY WILKINSON and TRACY WILKINSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 23, 2006
MADRID, Spain -- The Basque separatist group ETA declared a permanent cease-fire yesterday and pledged to step away from decades of violence, a major breakthrough that could end Europe's last armed conflict. The announcement came at a time of military and political weakness for the militant organization, which has fought for independence from Spain for nearly 40 years and claimed hundreds of victims in bombings and sabotage. It follows a fierce crackdown under the previous Spanish government and a period of rumored negotiation, officially denied, with the current one. The ETA has also seen its popular support fade amid public outrage over deadly bombings in Madrid two years ago by Islamic radicals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE . | October 16, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran -- Two bombs concealed in separate garbage bins exploded yesterday in a downtown shopping mall in the southern Iran city of Ahwaz, leaving at least four people dead and 75 wounded, state-run television reported. It was the first bombing since presidential elections in June, when a string of explosions went off in Ahwaz and in Tehran. Eight people were killed and 75 wounded in bombings in Ahwaz. No arrests were announced in connection with those bombings, but the government blamed the attacks on Arab separatists with links to foreign governments, including British forces based on the other side of the border, in Iraq.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - The political crisis over Ukraine's disputed presidential election threatened yesterday to tear the nation apart as leaders of eastern provinces pressed demands bordering on separatism and opposition supporters pledged to block the departing president's movements if he didn't meet their demands. Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko warned that the bitter struggle over which of them was the legitimate winner of the Nov. 21 vote risked escalating into violence and regional conflict.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Tearfully recalling the notorious shootout with the FBI in northern Idaho three years ago, Randy Weaver pleaded with sympathetic senators yesterday to "see to it that those persons who killed my wife and little 14-year-old son are brought to justice.""When high-ranking FBI officials issue death warrants and cover up their involvement, the message they send to police officers all over the country is: 'It is OK if you can get away with it,' " Mr. Weaver said.Mr. Weaver's separatist ideas and deep mistrust of government contributed to the siege of his family's isolated mountain cabin in a place called Ruby Ridge -- an incident that, like the subsequent fiery siege at Waco, Texas, has become a right-wing rallying cry against federal law enforcement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE . | October 16, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran -- Two bombs concealed in separate garbage bins exploded yesterday in a downtown shopping mall in the southern Iran city of Ahwaz, leaving at least four people dead and 75 wounded, state-run television reported. It was the first bombing since presidential elections in June, when a string of explosions went off in Ahwaz and in Tehran. Eight people were killed and 75 wounded in bombings in Ahwaz. No arrests were announced in connection with those bombings, but the government blamed the attacks on Arab separatists with links to foreign governments, including British forces based on the other side of the border, in Iraq.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2004
SRINAGAR, India - Prime Minister Manmohan Singh made his first visit as India's leader to the disputed Kashmir region yesterday and offered to hold unconditional peace talks with any separatists there who would shun violence. But a moderate separatist leader expressed disappointment at the invitation, which came as India began a limited withdrawal of troops from the region. "My brothers and sisters, my doors are open to all those who are ready to talk to me peacefully," Singh said from behind a wall of bulletproof glass in the summer capital of India's Jammu and Kashmir state.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2004
MOSCOW - Separatist tensions flared in the Republic of Georgia yesterday, with violence reported in South Ossetia a day after President Mikhail Saakashvili threatened to sink ships approaching the country's other separatist region, Abkhazia. The threat to ships in the Black Sea, including those ferrying Russian passengers, prompted pointed warnings from Russian officials, including Foreign Minister Sergei B. Ivanov, who said that Saakashvili's threat, if carried out, would amount to piracy.
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