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Separate But Equal

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By JACK FRUCHTMAN, Jr | April 5, 1992
When the Supreme Court abolished the "separate but equal" doctrine in 1954, it unanimously ruled that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." Now, some 38 years later, we may be witnessing the court's reversal of that principle in its decision Tuesday holding that schools which are segregated due to demographic patterns need not necessarily be subjected to continual judicial supervision.The court's unanimous 8-0 decision came in a case arising in DeKalb County, Georgia, where the school system, once segregated by law (de jure segregation)
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NEWS
February 10, 2011
The reader's response in the Feb. 10 edition that posed the question: why don't homosexuals give up on the term "marriage" ( "Same-sex couples: Find another word than 'marriage'" is advocating a "separate but equal" resolution to the question of gay marriage. That proposal should meet the same fate as that concept did in 1954. Alex Allman, Bel Air
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FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | April 4, 1991
IT WAS SUCH a simple request. The white children of Clarendon county, South Carolina had 30 buses to take them to their schools in 1950. The black children had none. All they wanted was one of the old, beat-up ones that the white kids were finished with.But they didn't get it. And so began one of the most important court cases in the history of this country, one that not only helped redefine what it means to be an American citizen, but also re-shaped the role of the Supreme Court in our government.
NEWS
March 26, 2009
JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN, 94 Historian of African-American experiences Duke University professor John Hope Franklin, a historian of life in the South and the African-American experience, died Wednesday in Durham, N.C. Dr. Franklin helped Thurgood Marshall win Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 case that outlawed the "separate but equal" doctrine in U.S. schools.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 7, 1991
"Separate But Equal," ABC's two-part miniseries about th Supreme Court's landmark school desegregation decision, is itself almost landmark television in two respects. One is the performance of Sidney Poitier as Thurgood Marshall, the NAACP lawyer and future Supreme Court justice who argued one of the cases that became known as Brown vs. Board of Education. Poitier's acting style may be too big-screen rococo for some television tastes. But its moments of high-intensity grandeur make it one of the performances of the television year.
NEWS
May 18, 1996
PRECISELY 100 YEARS LATER, the message stands forth with the clarity and majesty of self-evident truth: "In the view of the constitution, in the eye of the law, there is in this country no superior, dominant, ruling class of citizens. There is no caste here. Our constitution is color blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law."Such were the words of the first Justice John Marshall Harlan, a Kentuckian by birth and a former slave-owner.
NEWS
July 20, 2002
A PARAPLEGIC man is suing a Florida strip joint for being in violation of his civil rights because there is no wheelchair access to upstairs private rooms where he could get a "lap dance." The club owner said he could use a private room downstairs. But the plaintiff's lawyer replied that "separate but equal is not good enough." Sometimes, on controversial issues, we're conflicted as to whether this or that "constitutional right" can possibly be what the Founding Fathers intended. On this one, we're sure.
NEWS
March 26, 2009
JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN, 94 Historian of African-American experiences Duke University professor John Hope Franklin, a historian of life in the South and the African-American experience, died Wednesday in Durham, N.C. Dr. Franklin helped Thurgood Marshall win Brown v. Board of Education, the 1954 case that outlawed the "separate but equal" doctrine in U.S. schools.
TOPIC
May 16, 2004
The suit Though universally known as Brown vs. Board of Education, the case was five separate suits challenging segregation - from South Carolina, Delaware, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and the Brown case in Kansas that the Supreme Court ordered argued together. In many ways, Briggs vs. Elliott, the case filed by Thurgood Marshall from Clarendon County, South Carolina, which began when black parents sought school buses for their children, was the most representative, but Brown was listed first, so the Topeka, Kan., case has always been in the spotlight.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer | April 7, 1991
When a screening of "Separate But Equal" was held at the American Film Institute in Washington several weeks ago, the film's central character, NAACP counsel-turned-Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, was among the dignitaries in the audience.Although his presence alone at this event was most atypical, the 82-year-old justice, surrounded by family and friends, responded questions about the film with typical judicious restraint.A phone call to his chambers last week drew similar reticence.
NEWS
By Mark S. Langevin | December 8, 2008
I proudly teach government and politics at University of Maryland University College (UMUC) and often discuss the notorious 1898 Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court case with my students. Plessy cemented the post-Reconstruction Jim Crow foundation by endorsing the racist doctrine of "separate but equal." In some ways, UMUC is similar to the East Louisiana Railroad car that Homer Plessy boarded on June 7, 1892. Just as railroads served to propel the U.S. toward progress in the 19th century, UMUC plays a key role in creating a future of global opportunities for thousands of adult students in Maryland and throughout the world, offering bachelor's and master's programs, a doctoral program and a multitude of certificate programs and numerous online offerings.
NEWS
By Laura Pappano and Eileen McDonagh | February 6, 2008
Thirty-three weeks pregnant with twins, yet determined to lead her talented University of Maryland women's basketball team into the national championships, coach Brenda Frese - known for energetically pacing the sideline - found a novel way to relieve her aching lower back during a home game last month: She had an office chair rolled onto the gym floor. The result was a powerful visual metaphor for women in the world of sports. Ms. Frese's example, like Paula Radcliffe training through pregnancy and winning the 2007 New York City Marathon, doesn't camouflage - but actually flaunts - the fact that women are physically different than men. It also challenges an assumption that still dogs women today: The female body is athletically inferior to a male body.
TOPIC
May 16, 2004
The suit Though universally known as Brown vs. Board of Education, the case was five separate suits challenging segregation - from South Carolina, Delaware, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and the Brown case in Kansas that the Supreme Court ordered argued together. In many ways, Briggs vs. Elliott, the case filed by Thurgood Marshall from Clarendon County, South Carolina, which began when black parents sought school buses for their children, was the most representative, but Brown was listed first, so the Topeka, Kan., case has always been in the spotlight.
NEWS
March 19, 2004
WATCH THE pendulum swing: For three decades, co-education has been the rule to prevent discrimination based on gender. But this month, as anticipated, the U.S. Department of Education has proposed regulations clearing the way for public all-boys and all-girls classes and schools. As long as participation is voluntary, school districts are "evenhanded" in offering "substantially equal" co-ed or single-gender programs for boys and girls, and districts cite an educational benefit or school choice rationale for segregating by gender -- it would be legal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has proposed regulations giving public school districts new freedom to create same-sex classes and schools, as long as "substantially equal" opportunities are provided for the excluded sex. Supporters and critics alike said the proposed changes represent a major reinterpretation of anti-discrimination laws, some 50 years after the Supreme Court discredited racial segregation in "separate but equal" schools as inherently...
NEWS
July 20, 2002
A PARAPLEGIC man is suing a Florida strip joint for being in violation of his civil rights because there is no wheelchair access to upstairs private rooms where he could get a "lap dance." The club owner said he could use a private room downstairs. But the plaintiff's lawyer replied that "separate but equal is not good enough." Sometimes, on controversial issues, we're conflicted as to whether this or that "constitutional right" can possibly be what the Founding Fathers intended. On this one, we're sure.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration has proposed regulations giving public school districts new freedom to create same-sex classes and schools, as long as "substantially equal" opportunities are provided for the excluded sex. Supporters and critics alike said the proposed changes represent a major reinterpretation of anti-discrimination laws, some 50 years after the Supreme Court discredited racial segregation in "separate but equal" schools as inherently...
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | August 20, 1999
As students and professors head back to campuses around the country in the next few weeks, one person who won't be returning to classes is Professor Mary Daly, who taught at Boston College for 33 years.For most of her tenure, the self-described "radical, lesbian feminist" refused to allow male students into her classes in feminist ethics at the now co-ed Jesuit school (it once was an all-male college).The college put up with Ms. Daly's exclusionary policies for 25 years -- until last fall, when threatened with a suit by the Center for Individual Rights on behalf of BC senior Duane Naquin.
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