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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet with the mayor of Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday to announce an agreement to increase the business relationship between the two places, his office said this afternoon. O'Malley and Oh Se-hoon will sign a memorandum of understanding that will outline efforts to increase investment and trade opportunities between Maryland and Seoul. The two places are particularly interested in increasing investments in science and technology development, O'Malley's office said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Two new rolling cafes have joined Baltimore's food truck fleet. They were both parked on Thursday at Baltimore and Greene streets, a regular spot near the University of Maryland. Greenhouse Cafe serves organic Mediterranean food like falafel, hummus and stuffed grape leaves. The sole owner is Sophia Chafik, who recently moved her truck over from the Washington, D.C. area. The cafe's Twitter account is @greenhousescafe (note the extra "S. ") Road 2 Seoul is a first-time effort from three young men with restaurant experience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Two new rolling cafes have joined Baltimore's food truck fleet. They were both parked on Thursday at Baltimore and Greene streets, a regular spot near the University of Maryland. Greenhouse Cafe serves organic Mediterranean food like falafel, hummus and stuffed grape leaves. The sole owner is Sophia Chafik, who recently moved her truck over from the Washington, D.C. area. The cafe's Twitter account is @greenhousescafe (note the extra "S. ") Road 2 Seoul is a first-time effort from three young men with restaurant experience.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley will meet with the mayor of Seoul, South Korea, on Thursday to announce an agreement to increase the business relationship between the two places, his office said this afternoon. O'Malley and Oh Se-hoon will sign a memorandum of understanding that will outline efforts to increase investment and trade opportunities between Maryland and Seoul. The two places are particularly interested in increasing investments in science and technology development, O'Malley's office said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | May 29, 1992
With the opening of Towson Commons, the Seoul -- a pleasant little Korean-Japanese restaurant on York Road -- suddenly finds itself in the enviable position of being next to eight new movie theaters. If that doesn't fill some tables, nothing will.Baltimore now has several excellent restaurants that serve Korean food, but they can be a little intimidating if you aren't familiar with the cuisine. The Seoul has the advantage of having a fairly comprehensible and not too extensive menu, with Japanese dishes for those of your party who aren't ready for turnip kimchee, salads made with raw fish and casseroles of beef intestine.
NEWS
February 18, 1997
SOUTH KOREA made a good decision yesterday to maintain food aid and dispatch technicians to North Korea in hopes of providing it with nuclear power minus a weapons byproduct. Until this gesture for stability, both the noisy government of South Korea and the reclusive Communist-military regime of North Korea were talking up a crisis.North Korean diplomats in Beijing were threatening war if the prominent defector Hwang Jang Yop, who has just observed his 74th birthday inside the South Korean consulate there, is allowed out to Seoul.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | December 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top military leader suggested yesterday that U.S. and South Korean troops may be unable to defend Seoul against the first wave of a North Korean attack, but he asserted that any invading forces would ultimately be defeated.Army Gen. John Shalikashvili said an attack was not imminent, despite rising tensions over international access to North Korea's nuclear facilities and what he called "the unpredictability of the regime."The four-star general, speaking at his first Pentagon news conference since becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in October, emphasized that an invasion appeared no more likely now than several months ago."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 13, 1997
SEOUL -- South Korea may attempt to raise as much as $10 billion in a first-ever international sale of government bonds to provide cash to corporate borrowers that a U.S. rating firm says are at risk of defaulting on their debts."
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2004
SEOUL, South Korea - The traffic is notorious. The air is toxic. Real estate prices are among the most ridiculously inflated in the world. Residents and visitors can recite a long litany of complaints about Seoul, a city of 10 million that is as sprawling as Los Angeles and as congested in parts as Mexico City. So the South Korean government has come up with a solution: move. Last week, an evaluation committee designated a patch of land 60 miles to the south as the likely future capital of South Korea.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea's National Security Council worked yesterday on a compromise proposal to ease the standoff over North Korea's nuclear weapons program, spurred by warnings from North Korea's state-run media that "the present situation is very serious and unpredictable." The proposal, which will be submitted to U.S. and Japanese officials in Washington tomorrow, is part of a broader effort by South Korea to mediate between its ally, the United States, and its former nemesis, North Korea.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,Los Angeles Times | December 16, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- Posters paper the downtown, urging people to vote for the candidate who promises a "Clean Korea, Reliable President," or alternatively "A President For The Economy Who Makes It Happen." Organizers herd supporters they bus in from the countryside for outdoor rallies, where barrel-chested policemen are dispatched to tamp down trouble and candidates are welcomed with flickering candles held aloft in the chill evening air. All the usual signs of a political campaign in its frantic last stages are on display in Seoul as South Koreans prepare to elect a new president Wednesday.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 11, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- Under normal circumstances, South Korean presidential candidate Lee Myung-bak's overwhelming lead in the polls would leave him coasting to victory in December's election. Instead, he sees nothing but land mines on the path to power - from a threatened late entry of a heavyweight challenger to the possibility that he soon might be under investigation for financial fraud. Lee won a bitterly contested race to become the nominee of the conservative Grand National Party (GNP)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 3, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- As the South Korean hostage crisis entered its third week, sympathy here for the 21 people remaining in Taliban captivity in Afghanistan has been tempered by anger over their decision to travel to such a dangerous region. "My friends and I first wondered, `Why did the church send those people to a place the government had advised them not to travel?'" said Shim Sae-rom, a political science major at Ewha Womans University in Seoul. "What were they thinking?" When 23 South Koreans, most of them women in their 20s and 30s, were kidnapped July 19, the Taliban took an entire society hostage.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | April 20, 2007
Onto the foam and froth of a fresh cup of latte, Greg Suekoff pours a pattern of concentric hearts. It's ephemeral, romantic and almost too perfect to drink. Almost. The 10 tiny hearts slowly slip away with each sip. To Suekoff, a barista at Caffe Pronto Coffee Roastery, this is an art form. Tomorrow, he is taking his talents to an international stage in Seoul, where he will judge and compete in a top-tier national tournament. After winning the "latte art duel" at the Ultimate Barista Challenge at the New York International Restaurant Food Service Show this winter, he was invited to South Korea's challenge.
NEWS
By Mike Dorning and Mike Dorning,CHICAGO TIMES | October 20, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice nudged South Korea yesterday toward a firmer response to last week's nuclear weapons test by North Korea, a neighbor that leaves the South deeply conflicted. Rice received little in the way of public commitments from South Korean leaders other than a promise to comply with United Nations sanctions against the North and an assurance that the Seoul government would review how it operates two high-profile joint economic ventures in North Korea.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
At a West Indian club in Park Heights, they're readying the menu and the calypso music. In the ballroom of a Korean mall in Catonsville, the fans are hooking up the satellite feeds. And in Baltimore's Highlandtown, immigrant merchants old and new are preparing their bars and restaurants to be the epicenter for viewing the soccer world's most revered competition: the World Cup. The fervor of international soccer might be lost on many Americans, but don't tell that to those in the Baltimore area's ethnic enclaves where fans have been preparing for weeks in anticipation of the monthlong event, which starts today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 6, 2003
TOKYO - After weeks of tense discussions, the United States and South Korea agreed yesterday to reposition American troops far away from the demilitarized zone that separates North and South Korea in a gradual process that will make them less vulnerable to attack by the North. The 14,000 troops, members of the United States' 2nd Infantry Division, have long been considered a strategic "tripwire" on the Korean peninsula, ensuring that American troops would be drawn into any war started by the North.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | April 20, 2007
Onto the foam and froth of a fresh cup of latte, Greg Suekoff pours a pattern of concentric hearts. It's ephemeral, romantic and almost too perfect to drink. Almost. The 10 tiny hearts slowly slip away with each sip. To Suekoff, a barista at Caffe Pronto Coffee Roastery, this is an art form. Tomorrow, he is taking his talents to an international stage in Seoul, where he will judge and compete in a top-tier national tournament. After winning the "latte art duel" at the Ultimate Barista Challenge at the New York International Restaurant Food Service Show this winter, he was invited to South Korea's challenge.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Prosecutors indicted disgraced cloning scientist Hwang Woo-suk today on fraud and bioethics law violations linked to faked stem cell research, officials said. Five members of Hwang's research team were indicted on the same charges, prosecution official Lee In-kyu said in a nationally televised news conference. He said none of the six would be detained, but did not elaborate. Hwang was hailed worldwide as a stem cell pioneer and treated as a national hero until investigations late last year showed that he had fabricated key data in two papers he published in the journal Science in 2004 and 2005.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Barbara Demick and Tyler Marshall and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - U.S. and North Korean representatives met in New York last week but discussed no new diplomatic initiatives to resolve the crisis over Pyongyang's quest for nuclear weapons, U.S. officials insisted yesterday. A delay in the announcement of the meeting led to initial speculation among some North Korea specialists that it might have dealt with a sensitive new initiative to break the impasse. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said the meeting, held May 13, was initiated at Pyongyang's request in order to clarify the Bush administration's position on how to restart long-stalled talks among the United States, North Korea, Japan, South Korea, Russia and China.
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