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By Tyeesha Dixon | March 19, 2008
The sentencing hearing scheduled Friday for Joseph S. Ellis, the former Glenelg High School teacher convicted of sexually abusing a student, has been postponed. The court date has been rescheduled for April 25, according to the Howard County state's attorney's office. Ellis, 25, was convicted by a jury in January of sexual abuse of a minor, indecent exposure and telephone misuse. He also pleaded guilty in January to displaying obscene materials to a minor for sending inappropriate photos of himself to a 17-year-old former student.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 22, 2012
A 41-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced to 12 years in prison Friday for his role in a heroin conspiracy that spread through three Maryland counties, federal prosecutors announced. Alvin Williams Jr., who used his home to process the drug which was distributed throughout the city as well as Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties, pleaded guilty in April, after two days of trial. To date, more than two dozen of the roughly 30 people indicted in the case have pleaded guilty. The drug ring was run by Christian Gettis, who described himself during a February sentencing hearing as a family man living a double life: secretly dealing drugs while holding down a job in retail.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | April 28, 2007
When Jamaal K. Abeokuto knocked on his neighbor's door one afternoon in December 2002 after locking his keys in his girlfriend's apartment, the neighbor told him not to bother calling his girlfriend at work. Instead, Jimella Robinson testified yesterday at Abeokuto's capital sentencing hearing, she suggested he go across the street to Northwood Elementary School and retrieve the key that his girlfriend's 8-year-old daughter kept on a black shoestring around her neck. "He said he was in a hurry," Robinson testified.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
A 28-year-old man shot mid-day Monday in South Baltimore's Lakeland neighborhood later died of his injuries, city police said.  Ronald Dawson was found unresponsive at about 12:30 p.m. in the 2600 block of W. Patapsco Avenue, and taken to Maryland Shock Trauma center where he died about an hour later. Dawson was from the unit block of Cue Court in Owings Mills and may have stepped off a bus from Mondawmin Mall prior to the shooting. Police didn't give a motive for the crime, which happened near the county line that divides Baltimore from Lansdowne, and said it remains open.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Edward Gentry would readily exchange his life for that of his slain daughter, he told a Howard County jury pondering the fate of her killer yesterday."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1998
Defense lawyers for Scotland E. Williams pleaded yesterday with an Anne Arundel County Circuit judge to sentence the convicted murderer to life in prison without parole, because too many questions about his crime remain unanswered to justify a death sentence.But prosecutors countered that the Arnold man is dangerous and conniving, and that there is no reason to think that anyone else robbed and fatally shot two high-powered Washington lawyers in 1994 in their weekend home outside Annapolis.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
A social worker for Scotland E. Williams testified yesterday that the convicted killer fighting to avoid the death penalty suffered a troubled childhood -- beaten, emotionally abandoned and frequently left by his mother to care for his younger brother and sister.That version of Williams' family history came from S. Sandy Straub, social worker for the defense. She told Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Pamela L. North that Williams' mother disciplined her children routinely with a broomstick, extension cords or a flagpole.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,NEWSDAY | August 17, 2005
WICHITA, Kan. - Wichita residents know that for 30 years, Dennis Rader prowled their streets as the BTK killer, stalking victims he called "projects," hiding in their closets, and then binding, torturing and slowly killing them when they arrived home. They know he got his sexual kicks watching people die, including an 11-year-old girl he dangled from a pipe in her basement after murdering her parents and brother. They know this because Rader admitted it on June 26, when he pleaded guilty to 10 murders that had haunted the city since January 1974, when the girl, Josephine Otero, was found hanged in her house.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
CUMBERLAND -- Lawyers for John A. Miller IV, an unemployed store clerk charged with murder in the strangulation last year of a 17-year-old Carroll County girl, asked a judge yesterday to limit the evidence that could be used to decide whether their client should be sentenced to death in a trial scheduled to begin next month.In a series of motions addressing the sentencing hearing that would take place if Miller is convicted, Assistant Public Defenders Jerri A. Peyton-Braden and Jerome M. Levine asked Allegany County Circuit Judge Gary G. Leasure to restrict the "victim impact statements" that could be presented by relatives of the slain girl, Shen D. Poehlman.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | September 22, 1991
Beverly Seward escaped from an abusive father, kicked a heroin habitand pursued a successful career in the medical field, according to testimony last week at her sentencing hearing.She's a survivor, not a victim of battered spouse syndrome, as she has claimed, accordingto a psychologist testifying for the prosecution last week at Seward's hearing.Dr. Lawrence J. Raifman said Seward has fashioned a story portraying herself as a battered spouse to explain why she fatally shot Archie White, her companion of 12 years.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A 21-year-old fromAberdeen was sentenced in federal court Thursday to more than 12 years in prison for armed carjacking, prosecutors said. Tyrone Moore was sentenced to 147 months in prison followed by five years of supervised release for conspiracy, carjacking and using a firearm during a crime of violence, according to a statement by the United States Attorney's Office for the District of Maryland. In November 2007, Moore and two others used a gun to force a victim standing outside his SUV to give them his car keys, the statement said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 5, 2010
Sheila Dixon sat silently in court Thursday during her final hours as mayor of Baltimore, receiving a scolding from a judge who said she was leaving office "in total disgrace" after stealing gift cards intended for needy families and would carry a "badge of dishonor" for the rest of her life. Circuit Judge Dennis M. Sweeney delivered the rebuke during a sentencing hearing at which he accepted a plea agreement calling for Dixon to step down as mayor and pay $45,000 to charity while keeping her pension.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 4, 2010
Sheila Dixon sat silently in court during her final hours as mayor of Baltimore on Thursday, receiving a scolding from a judge who said she was leaving office "in total disgrace" after stealing gift cards intended for needy families and would carry a "badge of dishonor" for the rest of her life. Circuit Court Judge Dennis M. Sweeney delivered the rebuke during a sentencing hearing at which he accepted a plea agreement calling for Dixon to step down as mayor and pay $45,000 to charity while keeping her pension.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 17, 2009
Convicted hit man James Dinkins fired a string of slurs at a federal prosecutor Tuesday morning, calling the man a "bootlicker" and warning him to "stay away" from the defense side. The outburst came shortly before the jury entered the federal courtroom for the sentencing phase of Dinkins' trial, which will determine whether he and co-defendant Melvin Gilbert live or die. Both East Baltimore men were found guilty last week of murdering three men, including two witnesses, and running a drug conspiracy.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon | March 19, 2008
The sentencing hearing scheduled Friday for Joseph S. Ellis, the former Glenelg High School teacher convicted of sexually abusing a student, has been postponed. The court date has been rescheduled for April 25, according to the Howard County state's attorney's office. Ellis, 25, was convicted by a jury in January of sexual abuse of a minor, indecent exposure and telephone misuse. He also pleaded guilty in January to displaying obscene materials to a minor for sending inappropriate photos of himself to a 17-year-old former student.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | February 12, 2008
Baltimore County prosecutor Susan H. Hazlett says she had never before called anyone a predator in court. "But for this man, by his criminal history. ... I think that descriptor is appropriate," she told a judge yesterday at the sentencing hearing of Thomas J. Grant, a Salisbury man convicted of the rape and murder of an Essex woman in a long-cold case that was finally cracked through DNA evidence. "He preys upon those women in society who he feels he can violate." Baltimore County Circuit Judge Mickey J. Norman agreed.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- John A. Miller IV was described yesterday as a slick fielder on the softball field and a sharpshooter on the pool table, a good buddy to his friends and a loving father to his children -- and as a murderer whose life nonetheless should be spared. "He loves his children. You could see that in his face when he tells stories about them. He glows," said Lydia Becker, a former billiards-tournament partner of Miller's from Rochester, N.Y. Asked during the first day of a sentencing hearing how she would react if Miller, who was convicted last week of killing a Carroll County teen-ager, was sentenced to die, Becker said, "I would lose a part of my life, a good friend.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
A psychiatric social worker and clinical psychologist hired in 2000 by lawyers representing a convicted killer at a capital sentencing hearing testified yesterday that they never had an opportunity to present evidence that the man's current attorneys say might have led a jury to sentence him to life in prison rather than death. Attorneys representing death row inmate Lawrence Michael Borchardt Sr. in his quest to have his death sentence overturned say that the failure of Borchardt's previous lawyers to present expert testimony about the inmate's background and mental health at the sentencing hearing prevented him from receiving a fair sentence.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2007
For years, Chuck Poehlman couldn't imagine anything less than an execution for the man who sexually assaulted and strangled his 17-year-old daughter after hiring her to baby-sit his nephew. Even after the convicted killer's death sentence was overturned, Poehlman was adamant that prosecutors ought to pursue the death penalty the second time around. But the Carroll County man has relented, finally signing off this year on a plea agreement designed to end the years of roller coaster-like appeals that so many victims' families experience in capital cases while also ensuring that a murderer will spend most, and perhaps all, of his life behind bars.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | May 15, 2007
Jurors weighing the fate of former UMBC student John C. Gaumer heard several hours of tearful testimony yesterday from the convicted killer's parents and sister, who sobbed as they described his happy childhood, their small, close-knit family and their devastation upon hearing that he had been arrested for an act of violence so out of character that it was beyond their comprehension. "When he tells me how broken up he is about this, I just know this was not him," Janet Gaumer said of her son. "This was not him."
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