Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSentencing Guidelines
IN THE NEWS

Sentencing Guidelines

NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
It's the kind of case that makes defense lawyers cringe.In March, two lawyers persuaded a federal jury to acquit their client of murder in a killing committed to protect a bustling heroin and cocaine ring that was run from the Westport community in South Baltimore.But, because he was convicted of heading the ring and because the killing was committed in furtherance of the drug conspiracy, Dwayne Holland, 35, was held accountable for the death of Antonio Woodson and was sentenced yesterday to life in prison without the possibility of parole.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
Asserting that a Supreme Court decision last month had created "a wave of instability in the federal sentencing system," the Justice Department asked the court yesterday to review as soon as possible two federal drug cases that call into question sentencing guidelines. Justice Department lawyers asked the high court to hear the cases as early as September. The Supreme Court gave attorneys for the defendants in the two cases a week to file responses to the government's motions. Meanwhile, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco overturned the sentence of a Montana methamphetamine dealer, which had been enhanced by a federal trial judge.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2010
A Waldorf man convicted of trying to kill his pregnant girlfriend, a Crofton hairdresser, was given a life sentence Tuesday by an Anne Arundel County judge. Prosecutors contended Charles Brandon Martin, 33, sent a letter from his jail cell after he was convicted in the 2008 shooting that disabled Jodi Torok that sought to have the man acquitted of being the triggerman killed. Jail officials intercepted the letter and gave it to prosecutors. The letter was authenticated by a Maryland State Police expert, over the objection of the defense, at the hearing before Judge Pamela L. North.
NEWS
February 6, 2009
Police identify victims of fatal shootings Yesterday, police identified three men found fatally shot Wednesday in separate locations in the city and whose deaths appear to be unrelated. No arrests had been made. Shortly before 3 a.m., Eastern District police found Demetrius M. Saulsbury, 22, of the 3400 block of Elmley Ave., in the 1700 block of N. Washington St. in the Broadway East neighborhood suffering from a bullet wound to the head. He died a short time later at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
August 6, 1993
U.S. District Court Judge John G. Davies' sentencing of Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officer Laurence Powell, the two Los Angeles police officers convicted in the Rodney King beating, was much more lenient than most observers anticipated. They could be out in 26 or 27 months.Federal prosecutors recommended sentences that would have kept one of the officers in prison for at least six years and the other for a minimum of just over seven and a half years. So we are not surprised Benjamin F. Chavis Jr. of the NAACP charged that the sentences "display a wanton disparity, discrimination and inequity based on race.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
It was a bad day for Milton Tillman.Fresh from serving a two-year sentence for trying to bribe a Baltimore zoning officer, the one-time owner of a popular nightspot was back in federal court yesterday, this time to find out how long he would spend behind bars for his convictions in a sweeping tax-fraud case.His attorneys said Tillman learned his lesson. They said he should get credit for the time he already served. They said he didn't lie to his probation officer about a criminal conviction; a lie could increase his time in federal prison.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
A 20-year-old Perry Hall man is expected to receive a 10-year prison sentence after pleading guilty Monday in Carroll County Circuit Court in three marijuana-distribution cases.Frederick N. Boston Jr. will receive that sentence under a binding plea agreement, said Carroll County State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes, who prosecuted the case.Boston pleaded guilty to three charges of distributing marijuana -- a total of 1 1/2 pounds sold for $2,150 on three occasions in November, as well as conspiracy, and employing a juvenile and use of a handgun in drug dealing.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
The problem was this. In one federal courtroom, a judge handed out a sentence of 10 years. In another, someone charged with the same crime got a two-year sentence. "The feeling was judges simply had too much discretion," says Erik Luna, an associate professor at the University of Utah College of Law. "You had `Hang 'em High Harry' and "Set 'em Loose Bruce.'" The solution, crafted in the 1980s by a coalition of senators that stretched across a broad spectrum from Strom Thurmond to Edward M. Kennedy, was a set of regulations designed to ensure that the punishment fits the crime.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 16, 2008
MIAMI -- Alleged "dirty bomb" plotter Jose Padilla and two co-defendants were engaged in terrorism when they conspired to fight in foreign holy wars and should spend 30 years to life in prison, a federal judge ruled yesterday. The sentencing guidelines imposed by U.S. District Judge Marcia G. Cooke seemed to indicate that, at least in the case of Padilla, she would heed prosecutors' call for life without parole. A jury convicted Padilla, 37, and his co-defendants in August of conspiracy to murder, maim or kidnap persons abroad and material support to terrorism.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court opened its new term yesterday by wrestling with a legal mess left over from its last, when a decision limiting judges' power to boost jail time for criminals threw into doubt the constitutionality of the federal government's two-decade-old sentencing system. A government lawyer told the court that U.S. sentencing guidelines are sound and should stand. But that did not appear to ease the concerns of the majority, which ruled in June that a defendant's right to a jury trial is compromised when judges - not juries - determine facts that can boost jail time.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.