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Sentencing Guidelines

NEWS
February 12, 1996
AMID CRITICISM OF the minimum sentence for a Howard County man convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the 1993 chloroform death of his girlfriend, attention is again focused on the state's judicial sentencing guidelines and on their application.The case poses troubling questions for many who support the concept of sentencing guidelines and the traditional independence of the judiciary. Widespread reaction seemed a mixture of perplexity and outrage at the four-month sentence handed down last month by Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. to Melvin R. Bowers, who admitted placing a chloroform-soaked rag over the face of his companion in bed. Victims rights advocates charged that the short jail term reflected a devaluation of human life by the court, and little example for deterrence of future such crimes.
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NEWS
August 8, 2003
U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft likes to trumpet his tough-on-crime credentials - but going after federal judges who depart from federal sentencing guidelines isn't reason to toot his horn. Mr. Ashcroft is among those engaged in an attack on the federal judiciary's independence. Federal prosecutors are now required to report to the boss those judges who mete out sentences lower than the guidelines require, according to a July 28 memo from Mr. Ashcroft to U.S. attorneys. It stems from a new law aimed at curtailing the judges' flexibility.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Hearing arguments in a pair of drug cases, the Supreme Court justices said yesterday that they were inclined to give sentencing judges more leeway - but not total freedom - to impose shorter prison terms. In the 1980s, Congress adopted sentencing guidelines that set the range of prison terms for all federal crimes. The stiff guidelines and the mandatory minimum sentencing laws have swelled the prison population. Last year, 181,622 inmates were in federal prisons, up from 24,363 in 1980.
NEWS
December 4, 1991
In fighting crime, there are no quick solutions. Instead of deterring offenders, a federal system of sentencing guidelines introduced in 1987 has produced overcrowded prisons and inequities that should embarrass a country devoted to the ideal of justice for all. As David Simon reported in The Sunday Sun, mandatory sentencing guidelines, together with a series of mandatory sentences for some crimes and the elimination of federal parole, have caused a...
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 30, 2009
WASHINGTON -The Obama administration signaled a sharp departure Wednesday from 20 years of federal policy and called on Congress to close the huge disparity in prison sentences for those dealing crack versus powdered cocaine, agreeing with critics who say it is unfair to African-Americans. Newly confirmed Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer said the administration believes the so-called mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines are so inherently unfair that they have undermined trust in the country's judicial institutions, particularly among minorities who bear the brunt of the law. Breuer and other witnesses testifying before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee said the policies, launched when authorities feared crack was becoming an epidemic in the mid-1980s, are based on faulty assumptions that have long since been discredited, including that crack users were far more violent and dangerous to the community than powder cocaine users.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
It's the kind of case that makes defense lawyers cringe.In March, two lawyers persuaded a federal jury to acquit their client of murder in a killing committed to protect a bustling heroin and cocaine ring that was run from the Westport community in South Baltimore.But, because he was convicted of heading the ring and because the killing was committed in furtherance of the drug conspiracy, Dwayne Holland, 35, was held accountable for the death of Antonio Woodson and was sentenced yesterday to life in prison without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
A federal appeals court ruling could add to the number of inmates with legal grounds to seek reduced sentences because of a shifting interpretation of sentencing guidelines and what constitutes a violent crime. The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals invalidated last week a 31/2-year sentence for Jose Herbert Henriquez, an El Salvadoran who pleaded guilty to illegally re-entering the United States. The lengthy sentence was based in part on a previous burglary conviction. "A Maryland conviction of first-degree burglary cannot constitute a crime of violence," Judge James A. Wynn Jr. wrote for the majority, remanding the case to a lower court for Henriquez to be resentenced.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | May 13, 2006
Richard J. Moore created legal history when he successfully challenged a state law, arguing that a sex offender could not be convicted for soliciting an undercover officer masquerading as a young girl on the Internet. Yesterday, the Howard County man paid a heavy price for his appellate victory. Federal prosecutors took over the case, and a judge sentenced Moore to serve nearly 2 1/2 years in prison for traveling across state lines to have sex with a minor in July 2002. Moore, 39, of Elkridge had been convicted of solicitation charges in Frederick County Circuit Court in 2002 but he was sentenced to time already served in prison.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 12, 1996
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- How much latitude should judges have in sentencing people for serious crimes?Do we accept the fact that no two criminals (or criminal acts) are precisely the same, and conclude that judges must be allowed )) to factor in special circumstances?Or do we say that judges, like most people, have biases that, unless circumscribed by strict guidelines, bring intolerable double and triple standards to law enforcement?Those questions are now before the U.S. Supreme Court as the Rodney King beating case has spun off one more spasm of divisiveness.
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
Asserting that a Supreme Court decision last month had created "a wave of instability in the federal sentencing system," the Justice Department asked the court yesterday to review as soon as possible two federal drug cases that call into question sentencing guidelines. Justice Department lawyers asked the high court to hear the cases as early as September. The Supreme Court gave attorneys for the defendants in the two cases a week to file responses to the government's motions. Meanwhile, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco overturned the sentence of a Montana methamphetamine dealer, which had been enhanced by a federal trial judge.
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