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NEWS
December 9, 2009
A former Baltimore police officer received a five-year suspended sentence this week and was ordered to refrain from unsupervised contact with children after pleading guilty in September to second-degree assault. Troy Jaquan Gee Sr., 34, had been charged in Baltimore Circuit Court with child sexual abuse for allegedly fondling a 13-year-old relative in March 2008. The girl reported the incident to police, and Gee was suspended without pay from the Police Department upon his arrest. He has since resigned.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
A Crofton teenager was sentenced to 50 years in prison Thursday for raping a 7-year-old girl, in an attack that outraged a suburban Anne Arundel County community. Circuit Judge William C. Mulford II told David B. Raszewski that his actions were "beyond disturbing" and that there was "no appropriate sentence" to rectify the damage to the young girl and her family. "It approaches a level of depravity which shocks this court," Mulford said. "It's horrific." The sentence, life in prison with all but five decades suspended, was above state sentencing guidelines of 15 to 25 years.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Bradley Manning, the junior Army analyst convicted of espionage for leaking thousands of classified documents, was sentenced to 35 years in prison Wednesday, reigniting a debate over how far the government should go to punish those who disclose secret information. The sentence was far less than the 60-year imprisonment military prosecutors had sought and the 90-year maximum sentence the 20 convictions against him carried. Manning will appeal the ruling and will be eligible for parole after serving seven years at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., his attorney said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
A middle-aged heroin dealer received a mandatory life sentence last week in a federal drug-trafficking case, an outcome his lawyer said was particularly unfair because U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder had announced changes in the use of the stiff penalties just two weeks before. The example of Roy Clay, the dealer, points to the complexities of rolling out the new policy and applying it to cases that already ended in a conviction. But statistics compiled by the U.S. Sentencing Commission based on data from fiscal year 2010 suggest that his case may not be typical.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | October 23, 1994
Before handing a token sentence to Kenneth Lee Peacock last Monday for the shooting death of his wife, Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill noted a distinction between this case and the ''brutally difficult choices'' he has faced in sentencing drunken drivers whose irresponsibility had killed a relative, friend or bystander.Sara Engram is editorial-page director of The Evening Sun.
NEWS
April 22, 2006
A 25-year-old Baltimore man pleaded guilty yesteday to being a felon in possession of a firearm and received a 10-year prison sentence, followed by three years of supervised release, according to the U.S. attorney's office. As part of his guilty plea, Kondwani Martin admitted being involved in a gunfight with city police officers on South Eutaw Street outside the Upper Deck Bar and Grill on Feb. 10, 2005, prosecutors said. Martin was hit by at least three shots from officers.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | August 14, 1993
An article in The Sun Saturday reported incorrectly the length of the suspended prison sentence received by Christopher Suter after he pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in Baltimore Circuit Court. It was six years.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Robert Hooe Sr. and his wife and children can't understand why Robert Hooe Jr.'s killer was sentenced yesterday to 90 days of house arrest and 40 hours of community service.The Hooe family heard the judge and the prosecutor defend the deal that allowed Christopher Suter to avoid going to jail after pleading guilty to involuntary manslaughter in the younger Hooe's death in April.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
Circuit Court Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr.'s two-year sentence of Pamela Snowhite Davis for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana can best be described as malicious. An outspoken advocate for the legalization of marijuana, Davis is clearly being punished for espousing views that Judge Beck finds offensive.A trial jury in Westminster convicted Davis of possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and maintaining a common nuisance. The court's pre-sentencing report determined an appropriate punishment for the woman, a first-time offender, would be a minimum sentence of probation up to a maximum sentence of one year imprisonment.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
A 24-year-old Baltimore man, who was initially set free on state carjacking charges, was sentenced federally Tuesday to 40 years in prison for the same 2006 crime, which resulted in the death of a Security Square Mall store owner in Woodlawn. Defendant Brian Keith Rose pleaded guilty in Baltimore U.S. District Court after judge Catherine C. Blake ruled that she would allow fingerprint evidence in court. The prints had been excluded by Baltimore County Circuit Judge Susan M. Souder in the original state case, leading to federal intervention.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 19, 2010
Child predators would face at least 15 years in prison without the possibility of parole under a new measure given preliminary approval Friday morning by the Maryland House of Delegates. The move came as delegates gave their final OK to two other sex offender reforms -- eliminating good-time prison credits and requiring lifetime supervision for violent and repeat offenders. On Thursday night, the House Judiciary Committee signed off on the extended sentence for child predators. Anyone convicted of the second-degree rape or second-degree sex offense of a child under 13 would be subject to a mandatory prison term of 15 years without parole, a more than a threefold increase from the current penalty of five years with the possibility of parole.
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