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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
Federal prosecutors are calling for up to a decade in prison for the Howard County resident who became the youngest person ever charged in a terrorism case, arguing that the Pakistani immigrant "linked up with truly dangerous people. " Mohammad Hassan Khalid, who was a teenager with a full scholarship to Johns Hopkins University when he was charged, is scheduled for sentencing this week. Prosecutors in Philadelphia wrote in court papers that he lived a "double life," attending Mount Hebron High School, while also aiding extremists from his home.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Timothy M. Phelps, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
The U.S Justice Department invited thousands of federal convicts on Wednesday to request their release from prison, a measure that could have an outsized effect in Baltimore, where U.S. prosecutors have worked closely with local authorities. The Obama administration's plan is intended in part to lessen harsh sentences handed down under laws enacted amid fears about crack in the mid-1980s but rolled back since then. Judges have reduced many prison terms as drug distribution laws changed, but their powers have been limited by mandatory minimum sentencing rules.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
A judge has denied Del. Donald Dwyer's request to shorten his 60-day jail sentence in drunken driving and drunken boating cases, the delegate's lawyer said. Attorney David Fischer of Glen Burnie asked for a hearing on reducing the jail term, which Dwyer is serving on weekends. A judge denied the request last week, Fischer said. Judge Emory Plitt, a retired judge from Harford County, sentenced Dwyer in October to a year in jail with all but 60 days suspended in the two cases. Dwyer had pleaded guilty to operating a boat under the influence in a crash in August 2012 on the Magothy River that injured himself and six others, as well as to driving a car while impaired in August of this year, when police saw him speeding and swerving on Route 100 in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A corrections officer at the Baltimore City Detention Center received a 30-month prison term Tuesday for her role in a wide-ranging drug smuggling plot hatched by members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Katrina Laprade, 32, pleaded guilty to a racketeering conspiracy charge in November and was sentenced the day before the anniversary of the initial indictment in the case being unsealed. Federal investigators found that inmates and the corrections officers worked together to smuggle drugs and cell phones into the downtown Baltimore jail.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
A former employee at the Maryland School for the Deaf was sentenced Friday to seven years in prison for sexually abusing two girls at the school. Clarence Cepheus Taylor III, 38, showed no emotion as Howard County Circuit Judge William V. Tucker pronounced the sentence after a three-hour hearing. A young man seated in the spectator's gallery stood up quickly, shouted in protest and stormed out of the courtroom. Taylor, who worked as a school aide, was found guilty in a jury trial in November of two counts of child sexual abuse for inappropriately touching a 10-year-old girl and a 12-year-old girl at the Columbia campus.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold was led out of a courtroom Thursday with his wrists handcuffed behind his back and his head lowered, bound for the county jail after being sentenced for his misconduct in office conviction and behavior a judge condemned as "outrageous. " Outside the county courthouse, a Leopold supporter said the judge should be fired, while a woman whose lawsuit alleges that she was wrongly terminated by the Leopold administration walked from the building exclaiming, "Pop the champagne!"
NEWS
August 1, 1991
Only 17 percent of respondents to SUNDIAL agree that the sentence of life without parole for Eric Joseph Tirado, convicted of killing Maryland State Police Cpl. Theodore D. Wolf, is appropriate. The figure represents 141 callers out of 810. The other 669 callers, almost 83 percent, say the sentence is not appropriate."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
A middle-aged heroin dealer received a mandatory life sentence last week in a federal drug-trafficking case, an outcome his lawyer said was particularly unfair because U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder had announced changes in the use of the stiff penalties just two weeks before. The example of Roy Clay, the dealer, points to the complexities of rolling out the new policy and applying it to cases that already ended in a conviction. But statistics compiled by the U.S. Sentencing Commission based on data from fiscal year 2010 suggest that his case may not be typical.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | March 24, 2010
Prosecutors are portraying Gilbert Arenas as a thuggish intimidator who tried to pressure his teammate into a cover-up, as they argue for a three-month jail sentence for the NBA star on a weapons charge. Arenas' lawyer says his client is "a peaceful man" who played a misguided prank and has already been severely punished for bringing guns into the Washington Wizards locker room. He says the more fitting punishment is probation and community service. Both sides staked out their positions Tuesday in court filings, ahead of Friday's sentencing in D.C. Superior Court.
NEWS
March 24, 2010
A 39-year-old Edgemere man who claimed to be a police officer while waving a gun outside a Southeast Baltimore bar last fall pleaded guilty to handgun possession in Baltimore District Court on Tuesday and received a suspended three-year sentence, the city state's attorney's office announced. Arthur Campbell of the 2500 block of N. Snyder Ave. told police that he was trying to break up a fight at the Angle Inn in O'Donnell Heights and showed a membership card for the Police Emerald Society, a fraternal organization for area police officers of Gaelic descent, charging documents show.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Six months after the seemingly random murder of a 12-year-old boy in East Baltimore, police had not been able to solve the case, and, a prosecutor said in court Tuesday, the investigation had "gone cold. " But then in December 2011, a defendant in a drug case told prosecutors he knew something about the killing. Antwan Mosley told them that the boy, Sean Johnson, was gunned down as members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang lashed out in revenge for an attack on of one of their own. "That was a key break in a tragic homicide," Assistant State's Attorney Kelly Madigan said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Lawyers argued for almost two hours Thursday whether the skinny, hollow-cheeked young man from Ellicott City sitting in court was a dangerous al-Qaida plotter or a kid with undiagnosed psychological problems who was led astray by a cabal of bumbling terrorist wannabes. The hard-fought sentencing hearing at U.S. District Court in Philadelphia was the final act in the case of Mohammad Hassan Khalid, 20, who was charged with terror offenses while still a teenager. Khalid's lawyers wanted him released immediately, while federal prosecutors sought to send him to prison for eight years.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
- The commander of the Army Military District of Washington has approved the findings of the court-martial last year of WikiLeaker Chelsea Manning. Manning, who served as an intelligence analyst for the Army in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010 as Pfc. Bradley Manning, was accused of giving hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. She was tried last year at Fort Meade, found guilty of 20 offenses and sentenced to 35 years in a military prison. Maj. Gen. Jeffrey S. Buchanan approved the findings and the sentence last week, officials said Monday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
A Baltimore County man has been found guilty of second-degree murder in connection with the shooting and stabbing death of a man who was on the phone with 911 when he was attacked in a wooded area of Glen Burnie last January. A jury in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court on Friday found Eric Banks guilty of second-degree murder in the death of 26-year-old Darren Bell of Curtis Bay, but found him not guilty of first-degree murder, conspiracy to commit murder and gun charges. Judge Philip T. Caroom sentenced Banks to the maximum sentence of 30 years in prison.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
After serving nearly 40 years in prison for a fatal shooting, Walter Lomax was released in 2006 amid questions about his trial. On Wednesday, he celebrated another milestone in his case, as prosecutors formally dropped the charges against him. Lomax, now 67, was sent to prison after being found guilty in the 1968 death of Robert L. Brewer, a night manager of a Brooklyn food market. A judge commuted his sentence eight years ago, citing problems with the evidence that led to his conviction.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
A Maryland appeals court upheld former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold's convictions of misconduct Wednesday but struck down a part of his sentence that prevents him from running for office while on probation. Leopold was found guilty in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court of two counts of misconduct in January 2013, relating to ordering officers on his police detail and county employees to carry out personal and campaign tasks. Leopold's lawyers argued on appeal that he couldn't have known that his actions would be illegal because they aren't specifically prohibited in the law. They also challenged a provision of Leopold's sentence that barred him from running for public office while he serves probation.
NEWS
March 22, 1992
A 23-year-old Howard County man who went on a 15-minute armed robbery spree in South Carroll last May will continue to serve the 10-year sentence imposed on him.Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. last weekdenied a sentence reduction request by Wayne Edward Bell of West Friendship. In January, he was convicted of armed robbery, assault with intent to murder and use of a handgun in the commission of a felony and sentenced to 45 years, with all but 10 years suspended under termsof an agreement reached with the State's Attorney's Office in October.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A 58-year-old Yemeni man living in Baltimore was sentenced Tuesday to two years in prison for wire fraud in a $1.5 million illegal food stamp scheme, federal prosecutors announced. Ahmed Ayedh Al-Jabrati was convicted of trading cash for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits at his two convenience stores, Second Obama Express and D&M Deli and Grocery, in the 900 block of Harlem Ave. The SNAP program allows eligible people to use an electronic benefit transfer card similar to a debit card for approved food items from participating retailers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
The owner of Baltimore's Sonar nightclub was sentenced Thursday to 10 years in prison for his role in supervising a drug dealing and money laundering operation, federal prosecutors announced. Daniel Gerard McIntosh, 38, of Sparks, was part of a large drug operation busted by the Drug Enforcement Agency when it seized more than 80 pounds of marijuana and $30,000 in cash from the group's headquarters in the 3500 block of Hickory Ave., in Hampden. The agency also found 30 cell phones, documentation of a plane purchased for $450,000, books showing more than $14.5 million in marijuana sales, money counters and fake IDs in the sting.
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