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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Belfort Instrument Co., an old-line Baltimore manufacturer of meteorological instruments, has been acquired by two former executives of an aviation company.John Hoover, who has taken over as president of Belfort, said yesterday that the company, founded during the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant, was bought by K S Acquisition Corp., an Annapolis-based company headed by Mr. Hoover and Bruce R. Robinson, who is chairman. The purchase price was not disclosed.The two businessmen, Mr. Hoover said, previously worked together at UNC Inc., an aviation services company in Annapolis.
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
The robotic fish kept alone in a tank at the University of Maryland, College Park doesn't dazzle with its agility or speed, but it does promise bigger things to come. At the flick of a switch, water flows through the tank. The faceless gray plastic creature less than a foot long knows this, and you know that it knows this because it slides languidly from side to side to shelter behind a white plastic pipe, minimizing its energy use. The robot cannot see the pipe, but it can feel it. It may not look like much, but this is progress for associate professor Derek A. Paley, his College Park research team and partners at Bowling Green State and Michigan State universities, who have been working on the hardware, mathematical calculations and computer program for a couple of years.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service The Sun's metropolitan staff and the Hartford Courant contributed to this article | February 10, 1991
A device that got its start in stores as a weapon against shoplifters is finding its way into hospitals around the country -- to thwart abductions of newborns and guard the safety of Alzheimer's patients.The device is an electronic sensor that sets off an alarm when it is passed through specially wired exits. It can be carried in a bracelet or in tape woven into diapers.St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Conn., quietly introduced electronic surveillance to its maternity and neonatal units after a woman sneaked in and took a 16-hour-old infant two years ago.Hartford Hospital is in the middle of installing a system, a spokesman said, and Danbury Hospital, also in Connecticut, put in a similar system two years ago.By the end of this month, all newborn babies at Malden Hospital, in Malden, Mass.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
North County High School freshman Jack Andraka stood on the auditorium stage, speaking about the invention that earned him the $75,000 grand prize at the recent Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Behind him stood Dr. Anirban Maitra, a professor in the Johns Hopkins University's department of pathology who gave Jack use of his lab to craft his invention, a cheap and effective "dipstick-sensor" method of testing blood or urine to identify early-stage pancreatic cancer and other diseases.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
An electronic leak detection system apparently was not working when a service station in the Jacksonville area of Baltimore County lost 25,000 gallons of gasoline, according to a state official investigating the incident. The system of sensors installed in and around the underground fuel tanks and lines at the Jacksonville Exxon station on Jarrettsville Pike failed to react when tested about the time the leak was reported, said Herbert Meade, chief of the oil control program for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 7, 1999
When homeowners face life-threatening emergencies in the next century, the first response may not be from an ambulance crew. If current research continues to develop, the house itself could provide the initial medical assistance.Researchers say they are working on designing home safety sensors that identify and react to a medical emergency and, thanks to a new federal housing initiative, are getting the chance to put those and other ideas into action.The National Science Foundation announced a $1.5 million grant program last month to pay for engineering research to help create basic technologies needed to build the next generation of housing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara E. Holmes and Tamara E. Holmes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2003
Anyone who has spent much time traveling and has visited public restrooms has washed his or her hands under a hands-free faucet - one that switches on automatically whenever it senses the presence of hands. Could such technology be headed for the home? It's already here, experts say. And they say that the technology has improved substantially over the past 10 years and is making its way into the lives of more and more Americans. Technology that senses the presence of people has been around for years, primarily in the plumbing, lighting and security industries.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Michael Stroh and Scott Shane and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2003
Grieving NASA scientists began painstaking detective work yesterday to pinpoint the cause of the catastrophe that tore apart the space shuttle Columbia as the aging spacecraft plummeted into the atmosphere at more than 12,000 mph. They have a critical clue in the first sign of trouble during re-entry: the successive failure of temperature sensors embedded in the left wing, the left tire well and the hydraulic system that controls the left wing flaps....
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
Behind the scenes of the season's first snowfall yesterday, state road crews embarked on a 21st century-style battle against highway snow and ice. In its pursuit of bare pavement, Maryland is leading the nation with a sophisticated network of road sensors and weather stations that relay the tiniest details to highway crews every 20 seconds. It means early warnings of dangerous conditions. And fixing them before they do harm. The precision of the data helps eliminate the guesswork and misjudgments that can conspire to strand motorists and cost the state millions.
NEWS
By Jim Sellinger | October 5, 2009
The next time you're in a really nasty Baltimore traffic jam, glance at the driver in the car next to you. Note the grimace, the furrowed brow, the resigned stare. With its start-stop traffic and stomach-churning delays, rush-hour driving in and around Charm City has become a daily test of endurance that tries even the hardiest souls. According to a recent study from the Texas Transportation Institute, Baltimore drivers spent an average of 44 hours in traffic each year - time that could be better spent with family and friends, relaxing, even working.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 6, 2010
Bruce Fleming, the astute and outspoken professor of English at the Naval Academy and author most recently of "Bridging the Military-Civilian Divide," says conservatives tend to give the U.S. military blank-check approval while liberals give blanket suspicion. I agree with half of that assertion. While the latter might have once been true — certainly during the Vietnam War and, to a lesser extent, during the run-up to the Persian Gulf War — there's not much recent evidence that the American left is any different than the rest of the country: It's just not paying much attention anymore.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
The 33 men trapped in the Chilean mine for two months were exposed to extreme conditions, including poor air quality and 90-degree heat, which left rescuers desperate for real-time information about the miners' health. An Annapolis company, Zephyr Technology, helped fill the data void. Zephyr, a 30-person firm, provided the digital tools that allowed rescuers a half-mile above them to monitor the miners' conditions over the last month. Zephyr makes the BioHarness, a chest strap with digital sensors and wireless technology that monitor and transmit the wearer's vital signs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
The device that Mehdi Kalantari hopes will revolutionize monitoring of the structural integrity of bridges around the world is about as small and flat as a credit card and is powered by the sun, by ambient light or even by stray radio waves it can pick out of the atmosphere. An Iranian immigrant and electrical engineer at the University of Maryland, College Park, Kalantari has devised what he calls a lightweight, low-power, wireless sensor that he hopes will detect weaknesses in bridges and other infrastructure before they can turn into calamities such as the collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge that killed 13 people in Minneapolis in 2007.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
A year after the Johns Hopkins University implemented an electronic gunshot detection system around its campus, Baltimore police are trying out the technology in an area where it is likely to be more regularly put to use. Sheryl Goldstein, director of the Mayor's Office on Criminal Justice, confirmed that police have recently begun testing a single gunshot sensor in East Baltimore. Dispatchers have been overheard on a city police scanner recently alerting officers to possible gunshot detections along the high-crime Monument Street corridor, though the precise location of the sensor is unclear.
NEWS
By Jim Sellinger | October 5, 2009
The next time you're in a really nasty Baltimore traffic jam, glance at the driver in the car next to you. Note the grimace, the furrowed brow, the resigned stare. With its start-stop traffic and stomach-churning delays, rush-hour driving in and around Charm City has become a daily test of endurance that tries even the hardiest souls. According to a recent study from the Texas Transportation Institute, Baltimore drivers spent an average of 44 hours in traffic each year - time that could be better spent with family and friends, relaxing, even working.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | December 21, 2008
They started counting the gunshots near the Johns Hopkins University on Nov. 20. So far, 93 sound sensors have detected two noises loud enough to register on a new computer system designed to pinpoint gunfire by the explosion that forces a bullet from the barrel of a gun: * Dec. 2 at 2600 N. Calvert St., at 12:34:05 in the morning. * Dec. 3 at 4 W. University Parkway, at 8:38:32 in the morning. Only two? That's great news for residents of Charles Village and parts of Homewood, Abell and Harwood - residential neighborhoods east of the Hopkins campus in North Baltimore.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Deterrence, the tactic of choice against drunken drivers for two decades, is no longer working in the struggle to reduce the death toll, say private and government experts, and today they will propose moving toward alcohol detection in every vehicle. In the first phase, Mothers Against Drunk Driving, backed by a national association of state highway officials and car manufacturers, plans to campaign to change drunken driving laws in 49 states to require that even first offenders be required to install a device that tests drivers and shuts down the car if it detects alcohol.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 26, 2005
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space shuttle managers will have one eye on the weather and the other on a temperamental fuel-level sensor as NASA makes its second attempt to launch Discovery this morning. Liftoff is scheduled for 10:39 a.m. The long-awaited 114th shuttle launch would be the first since the Columbia accident 2 1/2 years ago. "All of our hardware is ready," NASA Test Director Pete Nickolenko said. "The launch and flight teams are ready, and our flight crew is ready for a successful mission."
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 20, 2008
FRESNO, Calif. -- Participants at last month's World Ag Expo in Tulare, Calif., were already familiar with debates over the relative merits of Ford versus Chevy trucks, or John Deere versus Kubota tractors. But a new debate emerged at the world's premiere farm show: Which is better, Macintosh or PC? In an industry that's increasingly turning to high-tech tools to assist in the ancient art of growing crops and tending livestock, the growing debate over computer operating systems is just another sign of the changing times, said Craig Buxton, chief executive of PureSense Environmental Resource Management.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | August 19, 2007
Many people will offhandedly say: "I have no sense of direction." But I, and the more than 7.5 Americans who suffer from Major Absence of Plotting Sensors (MAPS), will never joke about it. Except this once. This is because MAPS is a socially embarrassing disorder. People with MAPS have no idea what it means to travel in a northeast direction; we prefer instructions that say "turn left at the Wendy's." If we exit a building using a different door from which we entered, we will have trouble finding the parking lot unless we retrace our steps to the original door.
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