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Sense Of Place

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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 4, 1993
Casco Bay.--From my window, I watch the cat as he sets out on his appointed rounds. He stops to inspect the bird feeder, moves on to the asparagus bed and then, gingerly, steps around the wasp mound. Having staked out this territory, he assumes his morning post among the peony leaves.This cat -- my daughter's cat and my grandcat -- arrived here weeks ago, caged and collared and thoroughly citified. He was driven up the East Coast through megalopolis to the countryside where he encountered grass as a deeply suspect foreign turf.
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EXPLORE
March 19, 2013
I love Columbia. Unabashedly. No apologies. It has allotted me with a sense of purposeful design for living. It is a place I chose to invest in, grow roots and family and volunteer heavily in. It is a place where boats and cardboard things compete in song, and races pedaling marathons and cherry blooming blossoms eloquent in simplicity message hope and change. A place I have unabashedly relished coming home to for 40 years. With its crazy street mapping, impeccable open spaces doled with aging trees and weathered canopies, and propagated lakes staging liquid sunsets surrender to eroding feeder stream beds and oh the gawking feathered wildlife manufacturing poop decks of another kind.
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NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | December 4, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- America was settled by wanderers, and many of the heroes of its folklore are people who were constantly moving on and whose homes were where they spread their saddle blankets on the ground at night. Much of the nation's energy has always come from individual restlessness.Even today, with the frontier only a memory, we as a people tend to have a footloose quality. We're mobile, economically and physically. Even if we like the idea of staying home, which most of us don't, we don't tend to remain in the places where we grew up, but head for better jobs or prettier scenery somewhere else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | November 1, 2007
As a child, singer/guitarist Alex Brown Church traveled continuously. Church saw Hawaii, Alaska and even lived in a tent in France for about a year with his mother. Vivid images of people and places from his past formed the foundation for songs on Leaves in the River, the first full-length album for his band Sea Wolf. On and off stage, Church usually keeps a stoic expression on his angular, slightly scruffy face. Tomorrow, he and the other members of Sea Wolf come to the 8x10, opening for Nada Surf.
NEWS
By Judah E. Adashi and Judah E. Adashi,special to the sun | February 23, 2007
Ludwig van Beethoven and Daniel Bernard Roumain, the featured composers at tomorrow's Columbia Orchestra concert, have much in common besides their elegant three-name appellations. Both are acclaimed not only as composers but as virtuoso performers, Beethoven primarily as a pianist, Roumain as a violinist. Both prized the music of J.S. Bach, Roumain so much so that he wrote his own set of 24 etudes -- one in each major and minor key -- modeled after Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. And both composers are represented on the program, titled "City and Country," by works that actively engage the world around them.
NEWS
March 11, 1999
GERTRUDE STEIN'S saying about Oakland, Calif. -- "There is no there there" -- unfortunately applies to too many old Maryland towns that have seen their commercial centers atrophy.Glen Burnie, in an attempt to re-create a sense of place, is planning to build a 30-foot-wide arch at Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard and Ritchie Highway. Proponents don't pretend that their modest structure will rival Paris' famed Arc de Triomphe or St. Louis' soaring Gateway Arch. All they seek is a focal point for redevelopment of the town center.
FEATURES
By Steve Silk and Steve Silk,Hartford Courant | September 10, 1995
I've never regarded myself as much of a boulevardier, but I do know a good street when I see one. And I'm not half bad at recognizing a comely square, either.In miscellaneous rambles on five continents, I've discovered that the best way to take the pulse of a new town or city is on foot, tramping along its boulevards and byways, down its streets and across its squares.Time and forgetfulness have obscured my memory of most of those thoroughfares. But a few remain vivid in my mind's eye, because they somehow encapsule the very essence of a place.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1997
WHAT'S AN oyster got to do with where you live?"The speaker had recently moved to Calvert County, one of the flood of migrants transforming rural, seafood-harvesting Southern Maryland into the commuter burbs of Washington.His question -- both lamentable and eminently reasonable -- came in a "sense of place" focus group convened by the University of Maryland's Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy. Researchers were exploring how Calvert Countians perceive their lands and waters and how that might translate into preserving the natural heritage and traditional ways of life of the region.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1995
The RREEF Funds has completed a $30 million acquisition of the Dulaney Center office complex in Towson, an investment geared to take advantage of the local suburban office market's recovery.The two-building complex and adjacent garage marks the San Francisco-based pension fund adviser's largest investment in the Baltimore metropolitan area since 1986, when the company purchased the Annapolis Mall."It's got a real sense of place," said Stephen L. Grant, a RREEF vice president. "It's very difficult to find those types of investments, even nationally."
NEWS
April 11, 1992
When Harford County created its "development envelope" more than a decade ago, it mapped in new roads, sewer and water lines, but forgot something a blueprint can't show: a sense of place.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann is concerned that everyone calls Harford's Route 24 corridor "the Route 24 corridor." A nice place to drive, but would you want to live there?Actually, many people -- more than 40,000 -- now do. As Harford's population boomed over the past decade, most of the new subdivisions sprouted up along a new state highway, sometimes called "New 24," since it supplanted the former Route 24. While the county's population grew by 25 percent during the '80s, the largest census tracts in the growth area more than doubled in size.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
FREE FALL SHE NEVER LOST A PASSENGER / / 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday. Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, 830 E. Pratt St. Free. 410-727-6000 or baltimoreopera.com. ....................... Vikki Jones stars as Harriet Tubman in this one-act Baltimore Opera Company production directed by James Harp and featuring a 25-child chorus. The opera, honoring Tubman, explores her travails in guiding 300 fugitive slaves to safety and freedom in the North.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 7, 2007
Italian artist Luisa Lambri's atmospheric color photographs of Hooper House, a modernist Baltimore residence designed by Marcel Breuer, radiate a dream-like stillness tinged with melancholy and mystery. All of them show winter sunlight streaming through the trees outside the home's floor-to-ceiling windows. Beyond the trees, a small stream is barely visible from the house. These poetic images, which go on view tomorrow at the Baltimore Museum of Art, are not intended to describe what Hooper House looks like, however.
NEWS
By Judah E. Adashi and Judah E. Adashi,special to the sun | February 23, 2007
Ludwig van Beethoven and Daniel Bernard Roumain, the featured composers at tomorrow's Columbia Orchestra concert, have much in common besides their elegant three-name appellations. Both are acclaimed not only as composers but as virtuoso performers, Beethoven primarily as a pianist, Roumain as a violinist. Both prized the music of J.S. Bach, Roumain so much so that he wrote his own set of 24 etudes -- one in each major and minor key -- modeled after Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. And both composers are represented on the program, titled "City and Country," by works that actively engage the world around them.
NEWS
March 27, 2006
TODAY A SENSE OF PLACE -- The Baltimore County League of Women Voters will present a talk by Robert W. Stanhope, chief naturalist of the Baltimore County Recreation and Parks Department, at 6 p.m. at the Sheppard Pratt Conference Center, 6501 N. Charles St., Towson. The talk is "A Sense of Place: From Coastal Plain to Piedmont." Admission is $10. TOMORROW BALTIMORE COUNTY SCHOOLS -- The Baltimore County school board will meet at 7:30 p.m. to vote on the proposed boundary lines for the new Windsor Mill Middle School and hear a report on the secondary English and language arts curriculum.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
OCEAN CITY -- After a lifetime spent in Maryland's beach resort, former Mayor Roland E. "Fish" Powell is leaving town, lured like so many these days across the U.S. 50 bridge by developers who will soon demolish his modest St. Louis Avenue home for another condominium project. In a time of unprecedented redevelopment, the sand beneath his place and other older houses, restaurants and businesses is worth too much to stand pat. Even landmarks such as the silver English Diner at 22nd Street -- once an unofficial town hall, where Powell and other regulars still hold forth every morning -- are facing the wrecking ball or have already been demolished.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Retro art show Art from a retro era is on display at the St. Mary's College of Maryland's Boyden Gallery. Andy Warhol, Miriam Schapiro and Sam Gilliam are among a group of well-known artists who are featured in the exhibit RE: life: 60's and 70's Art from the Permanent Collection. The show, which includes more than 20 works, runs through Oct. 4. The Boyden Gallery is in Montgomery Hall on the campus of the St. Mary's College of Maryland at 18952 E. Fisher Road, St. Mary's City. Hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and noon-3 p.m. Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Retro art show Art from a retro era is on display at the St. Mary's College of Maryland's Boyden Gallery. Andy Warhol, Miriam Schapiro and Sam Gilliam are among a group of well-known artists who are featured in the exhibit RE: life: 60's and 70's Art from the Permanent Collection. The show, which includes more than 20 works, runs through Oct. 4. The Boyden Gallery is in Montgomery Hall on the campus of the St. Mary's College of Maryland at 18952 E. Fisher Road, St. Mary's City. Hours are 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays and noon-3 p.m. Saturdays.
NEWS
November 23, 2000
MOST PEOPLE don't know that the oldest fort in Maryland sits next to brick ranchers in the Baltimore County neighborhood of Stevenson. Most also don't know that highway engineers did not plot the alignment of Joppa and Old Court roads. They follow an old Native American path that linked the Susquehanna and Potomac rivers. Baltimore County is rich with history, yet few of us are acquainted with it. Suburbia is notorious for lacking culture and a "sense of place." But the Baltimore suburbs are full of interesting stories that could help us understand why things are the way they are. Most people don't know that the Greenspring Shopping Center on Smith Avenue used to be the Curtis Wright Air Field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and By Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"Blue Ridge," by T.R. Pearson. Viking. 243 pages. $24.95. Southern discomfort is the specialty of T. R. Pearson, who in six previous novels has chronicled a wide variety of sad and gruesome events in a series of small towns in North Carolina and Virginia. Yet so leisurely and discursive is Pearson's comic style that the reader feels no pain, anesthetized by the wry, affable drawl of his literary voice. Despite its title, "Blue Ridge" expands beyond this author's usual territory. His new novel veers between two narratives, one set in tiny Hogarth, Va., and the other mostly in the fleshpots of New York City.
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