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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1995
Desperately seeking a snowman sweater for a winter party? Earrings for a luau? A pair of shoes stitched to resemble baseballs?If you were Kit Dale, you'd own all this -- and lots more creative, occasionally eccentric clothing and accessories.The 40-year-old mother of two (and pet owner of three) is so well-known for her one-of-a-kind wardrobe that her Ruxton neighbors often raid her closet for special events.She's happy to oblige, she says, and dreams of one day having a store selling the sorts of things she searches for in Baltimore.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
The Rev. Father Joseph Valentine Messer, a Roman Catholic priest who served in Glen Burnie and Severna Park, died of dementia complications Wednesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 90. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was the son of Henry Philip Messer, who managed the old John Murphy church goods firm, and the former Mary Magdalen Goeckler, a homemaker. After his family moved to Halethorpe when he was a boy, he attended Ascension School and was a Catonsville High School graduate.
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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 19, 2000
Today's topic was suggested by a reader named Richard from El Paso, Texas, who wrote a letter asking: "How do you obtain a sense of humor? I am more seriously inclined, and I understand that women really love a man with a sense of humor. My main concern is how to apply it in everyday conversation to impress women." The first thing you need to understand, Richard, is that men and women do not have the same definition of the term "a man with a sense of humor." To men, it means "a man who thinks a lot of stuff is funny," whereas to women, it means "a man who talks and looks kind of like Hugh Grant."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
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By DAN RODRICKS | June 4, 2006
Rowan is back. I can hear the happiness in his voice, and I don't think it has anything to do with medication. As far as I know, the only mood-enhancer at play here is the anticipation of Rowan's return to what Rowan does best - making people laugh at Harborplace, tourist capitol of the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin. (Couple of weeks ago, a guy writes from Hampden - or Honville - that he doesn't like it when I use John Goodspeed's old nickname for Baltimore. He thinks it's a putdown.
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By Susan Canfora and Susan Canfora,Special to The Sun | July 17, 1994
After 38 years as an illustrator for the adolescent Mad Magazine, Seaford, Del., resident Bob Clarke hasn't gone mad, but he admits to having a childlike sense of humor."
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By SUSAN DEITZ and SUSAN DEITZ,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 11, 1993
Q: Any aadvice on rekindling an exciting desire for intimacy between two people who have hit a dull spot after three years? What can a woman do to please a man? Men seem to back away if you get too pushy, but there must be some mid-point. Have you surveyed any men to find what they perceive to be exciting in a woman?A: In every survey I have taken focusing on sexuality, a sense of humor (in and out of bed) rated high as an appealing trait. (Intelligence is linked to that, the brain being the largest sex organ we have.
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By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 2, 1995
In the summer of 1965, in his first at bat as a Baltimore Oriole, young Davey Johnson smacked a single off New York Yankee immortal Whitey Ford. Then, gracefully dancing off first base full of new-found joie de vivre, Johnson promptly got himself picked off.This was considered not so good. So, when he drew a walk in his second at bat, Johnson was careful to wait until he got all the way to second base before getting himself picked off once again.In the Baltimore dugout that day, Billy Hunter corner him long enough to offer a piece of sage major league wisdom.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
DiVina Celeste of Towson became famous not for her clothes, but lack of them. Celeste is a Penthouse centerfold veteran who worked for the magazine as a model and goodwill ambassador until three years ago. Besides the usual Penthouse attributes, Celeste has a big heart, not to mention a great sense of humor and style. Ask her, for example, about appropriate dress and she'll go into a hilarious rap about Ginger and her gowns on "Gilligan's Island." Now that she's retired, Celeste, 44, has more time to work for good causes like the Center for Poverty Solutions.
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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2008
Ricky Knight, a 12-year-old boy who never lost his sense of humor, determination or love of sports while battling brain cancer for more than a year, died of the disease Monday. Ricky, a sixth-grader at Elkridge Landing Middle School, was diagnosed with the cancer in April 2007. After a grueling summer of surgeries and treatment, he played football in the fall with the Elkridge Hurricanes. His father, Rick Knight, described the game as "good therapy," and coaches and teammates marveled at the boy's courage.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Sometimes, Maryland defensive line coach Greg Gattuso will lapse back to when he was a howling bear of a head coach stalking the sidelines as if looking for prey. Gattuso coached Duquesne for 12 seasons, and - while he understands his role is more limited at Maryland - he never relinquished his passion or his penchant for looking at the big picture. It's who he is. "I was very aggressive as a head coach," said Gattuso, 51, a former defensive tackle who played for the late Joe Paterno on Penn State's 1982 national championship team and remained loyal to the coach.
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
After a bar has been around for a while, it's easy to take it for granted. This year, three Baltimore bars that have been in business for over a decade marked major anniversaries: Brewer's Art turned 15 and Max's 25. These two bars are hardly taken for granted; they are universally praised by wildly different constituencies. The third, though, which turned 15 in September, doesn't get nearly enough love. Holy Frijoles deserves recognition. It has excellent, under-rated cocktails - the margaritas are poured by the dozen - and a menu that is stuffed with guilty pleasures.
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By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Baltimore-born Donna A. Lewis is a lawyer for the Department of Homeland Security who moonlights as a stripper. A comic stripper. Her semi-autobiographical strip, "Reply All," about a successful career woman struggling with self-doubt, has just been syndicated by The Washington Post Writers Group. It debuts Monday in about a dozen newspapers nationwide, including The Post, Boston Globe and Charlotte Observer. While the strip is based loosely on Lewis' life, you won't see any "Dilbert"-style references to her day job. And not just because, as her bio on http://www.replyallcomic.com deadpans, "Donna is not funny or interesting at all by day. " Homeland Security has given her the OK to write the comic strip in her spare time, with the caveat that she must steer clear of anything related to her work for the department's Office of General Counsel.
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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2010
As a Marine reservist, Tyrone A. Brown committed to six years of active drilling, which he fulfilled in 2004, followed by two years in which he would be available for call-up if necessary. But just after he left its active ranks, his unit learned it was going to Iraq. "He came back just for us," his friend and fellow Marine corporal Chris Palmerino said in an interview. "He had already fulfilled his six-year obligation." As others would also say at Mr. Brown's funeral on Wednesday, Mr. Palmerino said his platoon leader "took care of us."
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By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
Judge Charles E. Moylan Jr. is well-known for introducing literary references and colorful prose to liven the opinions he writes for Maryland's second-highest court. But he might have outdone himself this month on what could have been a dry, routine drug case out of Cecil County. He put in chapters: "There is nothing wrong with investigative opportunism." "The shelf life of a traffic stop." "An incredible journey." He wrote about Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson, the right of a police dog to sniff, and he even included a section partly written in German - "Bleiben sie, bitte, mein hund!"
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 21, 2009
The Rev. Anthony Rivera "Tony" Perez, the vice rector of St. Mary's Seminary and University who taught liturgy and theology, died of a heart attack Sept. 12. He was 57. Colleagues said he collapsed and died after playing a game of racquetball with his students. He was transported to Union Memorial Hospital, where his death was confirmed. Father Perez moved to Baltimore in 1997 and served in numerous capacities at the Roland Park educational institution run by the Society of Saint Sulpice, of which he was a member.
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By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
The Naval Academy, a bastion of decorum and proper appearances, has gone to great lengths over the years to control publications bearing its name. Yet since February, a handful of midshipmen, sworn to secrecy, has produced a feisty, often irreverent underground newspaper online from a dorm room in the school's century-old residence hall. Called the Log Online after an embattled student newspaper that the academy killed last school year, the revived monthly pokes fun at the administration and runs editorials and content far afield of the cheery features about volunteerism and school events that appear in the Trident, the academy's official newspaper published by the school's public relations department.
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By Bill Blewett | January 5, 1991
ONE OF THE FIRST things I learned in working for the federal government is that the federal government has no sense of humor. It may foster an occasional absurdity, but it never laughs at itself.2 Does this mean we don't have to pay for this?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Imagine the vintage sitcom Sanford and Son somehow fusing with Noel Coward's Blithe Spirit and you get some idea of what to expect in The Soul Collector, the bright and inventive play by David Emerson Toney receiving a robust world premiere production from Everyman Theatre. The Soul Collector, at heart, is a fable, and like any good fable, it gets its moral across while spinning an entertaining yarn. Toney's tale manages to pull several surprises along the way, some purely theatrical in the best sense of the word, others involving little sidesteps of plot.
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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
Philip Nelson can't wait to start his new job as Columbia Association president. "I think it's a great opportunity. I think it's a great place," he said. Nelson, 59, plans to resign tomorrow as city manager in Troy, Mich., and should be in Columbia full time by the end of April. His wife, Virginia, will stay in Michigan to sell their home. His term officially starts May 1, when he will replace Maggie J. Brown. The length of term and salary have not been finalized, said Tom O'Connor, chairman of the Columbia Association's board of directors.
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