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By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
Like dancers in a backstage chorus line, participants kicked and turned to every command. While some giggled or caught their breath amid the intricate steps of the Bump, the Hustle and the New Jersey Skate, the group held steadfast as Shirley Duncan instructed them to "bump to the left, bump to the right." Although closer in generation to Fred Astaire than to John Travolta, the 23 eager participants are members of Urban Line Dancing, one of many programs offered at Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia.
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Staff reports | February 7, 2012
Fifth District County Council member David Marks last week nominated West Towson resident Jane Roger to serve as a local representative on the Baltimore County Commission on Aging. The commission is an advisory panel that helps the county accommodate the housing, health care, nutritional and social needs of seniors. Roger is a state employee, working for the Maryland Department of General Services. She has been a small business owner, a longtime member of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, and a member of the Baltimore County Republican Central Committee.
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NEWS
By Nina Sears and Nina Sears,sun reporter | April 25, 2007
It is relatively quiet at the new O'Malley Senior Center Annex. Retired dispatcher Craig Sisk, 61, enjoys a game of pool alone in the spacious room that features two pool tables - one more than can be found at the senior center across the street. Longtime patron Marion Adams, 71, shows off a design she painted on a bright pink shirt in her decorative arts class held in the new crafts room. "I think this is a great opportunity," she said of the new space. "The facilities couldn't be better for learning and play."
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Tanika White and Sumathi Reddy and Tanika White,Sun reporters | August 7, 2008
The Baltimore region is going gray. While the region's population showed a modest increase of about 4 percent from 2000 through 2007, the number of residents ages 55 to 64 and those 85 and older increased by about a third, according to an analysis of U.S. census data released today. The former group is the result of the baby boom generation reaching retirement age; the latter, an aging society living longer. "Longevity has increased so much," said Rose Viscidi, a resident of Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville who is her in 80s. She takes daily aerobics classes and keeps busy, engaging in a lifestyle that has become more the norm for her age group.
EXPLORE
Staff reports | February 7, 2012
Fifth District County Council member David Marks last week nominated West Towson resident Jane Roger to serve as a local representative on the Baltimore County Commission on Aging. The commission is an advisory panel that helps the county accommodate the housing, health care, nutritional and social needs of seniors. Roger is a state employee, working for the Maryland Department of General Services. She has been a small business owner, a longtime member of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, and a member of the Baltimore County Republican Central Committee.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
Howard County, with the smallest percentage of senior citizens in the state, is poised for an explosion of new homes for retirees. That's because builders realize that the county is on the edge of a dizzying upsurge in the senior population. Developers are in the midst of finishing one "active adult" neighborhood, have county approval for four more projects and have proposed at least six others. All told, the plans would add about 1,400 houses, townhouses and apartments for seniors to the county's landscape.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
The county's senior population will have to do a lot more with a lotless next year, because its numbers are growing as revenue is decreasing, a group of senior citizens in Columbia was told Tuesday.Susan Rosenbaum, administrative assistant in the county Office on Aging,told the Senior Advocates group that her office has already had to pare $78,000, or 7 percent, from this year's budget because of the county's economic crisis."We are trying not to affect services," Rosenbaum said. But each senior now receiving benefits "will receive less" next year because there are more people joining their ranks.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
Starting June 16 and continuing on the third Wednesday of every month, page 3B in the Carroll County edition of The Sun will be a special page for senior citizens. The senior population is growing in Carroll, and we hope that the news, features and calendar listings on this page will inform and entertain.We also want to hear from senior citizens. So, one feature of the new page, Voice of Experience, will give seniors a chance to write about some of their experiences and share their wisdom.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff writer | July 7, 1991
Helen and George Stroup can tell you about the benefits of staying active in your senior years."You feel better after you've exercised. People don't believe you, but you do," Helen Stroup said.The Stroups, both 73, joined the Bel Air Athletic Club just afterit opened in 1980. Neither had been very active before, but these days they rarely miss a workout."I had high cholesterol," said Helen Stroup, who moved to Bel Air from just outside Altoona, Pa., after she and her husband retired in 1979.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | September 29, 1993
An unfunded state mandate may soon take a bite out of group meal programs for Carroll's senior citizens.The state has told the county it must foot the bill for one meal a day at the assisted-living program for low-income elderly at Ridge Residences, a Westminster seniors apartment complex.Janet B. Flora, chief of the county Bureau of Aging, said she supports Ridge Residences in its mission, which she said is to help elderly people remain independent instead of going into nursing homes.However, she said, the state mandate came with no extra money from the state to pay for it. Instead, money will have to come from the bureau's nutrition budget -- already dedicated to providing group meals at sites around Carroll County, including senior citizens centers.
NEWS
By Nina Sears and Nina Sears,sun reporter | April 25, 2007
It is relatively quiet at the new O'Malley Senior Center Annex. Retired dispatcher Craig Sisk, 61, enjoys a game of pool alone in the spacious room that features two pool tables - one more than can be found at the senior center across the street. Longtime patron Marion Adams, 71, shows off a design she painted on a bright pink shirt in her decorative arts class held in the new crafts room. "I think this is a great opportunity," she said of the new space. "The facilities couldn't be better for learning and play."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Howard County Council Democrats have promised to vote for a Republican-sponsored property tax cut for seniors on the night before Halloween - and just eight days before the general election - but the GOP isn't taking any chances. Council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, a co-sponsor of the bill and the Republican nominee for county executive, sent out a "Senior Alert" e-mail to organize a lobbying campaign on behalf of the tax cut after Democrats postponed a vote Tuesday. He said he was "extremely disappointed" by the Democrats' action.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | September 3, 2006
When an estimated 600 people crowded into the Alesia and Medford Building at the Carroll County Agriculture Center last year for the first Seniors on the Go Expo, Carroll County Bureau of Aging officials were thrilled. "We handed out 500 bags [of give-away items and brochures] by 11 a.m., so we think we had over 600 last year," said Brenda Shipley, expo chairwoman. "We're planning on 1,000 this year. We're making up 1,000 bags, but we're not sure if that's high or low." If the number of vendors and a change in location to a larger building are any indication, this year's event, scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday at the Danele Shipley Arena at the Ag Center in Westminster, will be even bigger.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
John Erickson made his fortune building resort-like retirement communities for the aging, in part by promoting the properties through a publication that looked like a newspaper, but with no pretense that it was journalism. He mailed the publication to potential residents of his Erickson Retirement Communities - people over age 50 in major cities where he had built or planned to construct one of his large campuses. The Erickson Tribune included stories and tidbits on all the services offered at his communities, which boast their own health care system, restaurants and man-made lakes.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
With America's baby boomers starting to reach their golden years, senior population-related industries are flourishing, along with programs from the Bureau of Aging at the federal, state and local level to assist them with nearly every aspect of their life, from housing and medical care to abuse prevention and transportation. "Baby boomers have been referred to as a tsunami - this great swelling up - and we're changing the way we're looking at services for that group of individuals," said Jan Flora, Carroll County Bureau of Aging chief.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2004
Like dancers in a backstage chorus line, participants kicked and turned to every command. While some giggled or caught their breath amid the intricate steps of the Bump, the Hustle and the New Jersey Skate, the group held steadfast as Shirley Duncan instructed them to "bump to the left, bump to the right." Although closer in generation to Fred Astaire than to John Travolta, the 23 eager participants are members of Urban Line Dancing, one of many programs offered at Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia.
FEATURES
By Warren Robak and Warren Robak,Copley News Service | April 16, 1991
Sometimes Catherine Bannerman feels like a sleuth in a white smock.The mysteries she unravels are the medical ills troubling her elderly patients -- part of the nation's growing senior population -- who seldom exhibit the same clear symptoms as younger patients.So Dr. Bannerman looks for the little things."If some little old lady comes in and says she doesn't feel quite right, it could be a whole host of things," said Dr. Bannerman, director of a senior health center. "People can feel not quite right and that can be a heart attack."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
Tensions over development in a maturing Howard County highlighted debate on a bill to change the rules for building new homes for the fast-growing senior population at a County Council hearing last night. The bill, sponsored by Ellicott City Republican Christopher J. Merdon, would raise the minimum number of units from 20 to 50 to qualify for "floating" senior housing zoning. It is controversial because it would limit where the senior communities could be built . Advocates for seniors fear that approval would mean less housing availability, while Merdon's backers say small lots burdened with densely packed townhouses could visually hurt older, traditional neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
Columbia is reinventing downtown, that playground of the young, as a home for older folks, too. Developers are planning an "active adult" apartment complex that would bring 156 units on 5 acres overlooking The Mall in Columbia off Governor Warfield Parkway. They would be the first Town Center rentals limited to people ages 55 and older. Those units would add older residents to a downtown that has a significant senior population in luxury apartments and a retirement high-rise. Community leaders hope that is just the start.
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