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By Don Markus | October 9, 2008
FIVE TO WATCH AT FIVE FARMS Loren Roberts: The tournament's defending champion went on to win the Schwab Cup while finishing second for Player of the Year honors. The so-called "Boss of the Moss" because of his putting prowess, Roberts is having a good year (fifth in earnings) but has won only once. Eduardo Romero: In his second full season on the Champions Tour, "El Gato" is the hottest player coming into the tournament. He has won three times in his past five events, including the U.S. Senior Open and most recently at the SAS Championship two weeks ago. Romero is second on tour in driving distance (293.
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By From Sun staff and news services | May 25, 2009
Golf First-time winner Allen edges Mize in Senior PGA Michael Allen made two late birdies and shot a 3-under-par 67 to hold off Larry Mize by two shots and win the Senior PGA Championship in Beachwood, Ohio. Allen, who had never won in two decades on the PGA Tour, finished first in his seniors debut. It's the first major of the year for players over 50 years old. After hitting close on the 18th hole, he mugged for a camera and said, "About time!" while laughing. Allen had earlier rounds of 74, 66 and 67 to finish at 6-under 274. Bruce Fleisher had a 67 to finish third.
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SPORTS
April 21, 1991
PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. -- It was just like old times. Wit one round left, Jack Nicklaus blew out the field and took a record eight-stroke lead after three rounds of the 52nd Senior PGA Championship.Nicklaus led by five strokes before yesterday's play, saw his lead dwindle to one stroke over Jim Dent at the turn, then put himself in commanding position to win for the fourth time in six tries among the over-50 set."Often I don't play that well with a few shots lead," Nicklaus said. "Jim got to within one, and I just gave myself a kick, said, 'This is ridiculous; you've got to get going.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | October 9, 2008
FIVE TO WATCH AT FIVE FARMS Loren Roberts: The tournament's defending champion went on to win the Schwab Cup while finishing second for Player of the Year honors. The so-called "Boss of the Moss" because of his putting prowess, Roberts is having a good year (fifth in earnings) but has won only once. Eduardo Romero: In his second full season on the Champions Tour, "El Gato" is the hottest player coming into the tournament. He has won three times in his past five events, including the U.S. Senior Open and most recently at the SAS Championship two weeks ago. Romero is second on tour in driving distance (293.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
A Senior PGA Tour event in the Baltimore area became a reality yesterday with the announcement that State Farm Insurance Co. would be the title sponsor for a full-field event.The first State Farm Senior Classic will be held July 3 through 5 at Hobbit's Glen Golf Club in Columbia. The 54-hole tournament, to be televised by ESPN, will carry a purse of $1.25 million.The FORE Baltimore Foundation, founded two years ago to raise money for local charities through golf tournaments, is a co-sponsor with the Senior PGA Tour and will have the Maryland Special Olympics as the primary charity.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
There is a lot of history surrounding the property at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley, beginning with the 19th century limestone mansion that serves as the clubhouse. Many of the original buildings are still being used and one - the caretaker's house - reportedly is inhabited by a ghost. Some new history might be started today, when the $1.45 million State Farm Senior Classic opens at the 3-year-old club in Baltimore County. A field of 78 players, including seven of the top 10 money-winners on this year's Senior PGA Tour, will begin the 54-hole event on the 7,031-yard, par-72 course.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2000
Robert Alipanah is hoping that golf fans watching the State Farm Senior Classic will swing by his restaurant while they're in the area. "Since I'm a seafood restaurant and not too far from them, I'm hoping that I get a good crowd," said the owner of Atlantis Seafood in the Harper's Choice Village Center, which by yesterday was already seeing new faces in the dining room and potential customers dropping by to check out the menu. With the State Farm Senior Classic being held this week in Columbia and record crowds expected, Alipanah is one of many local business owners hoping the tournament will mean more money in their cash registers.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
If experience counts for anything at this weekend's Greater Baltimore Classic, consider golfer Clyde Hughey a serious contender. We're not talking about golfing experience, of course. He barely has a lick of that. At least, that is, compared to some of the seasoned pros and major champions set to tee it up Friday at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley. But life experience? You can bet Hughey, 53, measures up well against anyone. "I didn't grow up on a country club and never played on a golf team," said Hughey, one of 78 Senior PGA players scheduled to compete in the three-day tournament.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1998
The Senior PGA Tour is filled with stories about players who spent much of their lives out of the limelight and became overnight success stories after the age of 50. But even Walter Morgan and Jim Albus and Tom Wargo were winning tournaments somewhere.Bob Dickson was hardly playing golf."I played the PGA Tour for 10 years," Dickson said yesterday by way of introduction, standing on the practice range at Hobbit's Glen Golf Club in Columbia as he prepared for this week's State Farm Senior Classic.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
In its infancy, the Senior PGA Tour provided a stage on which Arnold Palmer could still play the role of "The King." Other past golfing heroes were his court, providing their own fans with a few more lasting memories. By the time it reached adulthood - marking its 21st birthday last year - the tour was in trouble. With the exception of the four major championships and a few other events, attendance was dropping. Corporate interest was waning, too, as evidenced by the lack of television exposure and some sponsors who failed to renew their contracts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2003
Bruce Summerhays is one of the fittest players on the Champions Tour, once playing a tour-record 119 rounds in a single season. But now, approaching 60, Summerhays has a left knee that needs replacing. And he knows that someday he might have to get a medical exemption to ride in a cart while competing. Summerhays also knows that he might not be able to get one. Though changes are still being discussed regarding the use of carts during competition, there is a growing feeling that PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem would like to have the same rules apply to the Champions Tour as to the PGA and Nationwide tours.
SPORTS
June 30, 2002
The Sun's Travis Haney spoke with Eric Schwarz, who has caddied for 23 years and been on Fuzzy Zoeller's bag since 2000. Q: What is it like to caddie for a colorful guy like Fuzzy? A: I've known him for 23 years, since I've been a caddie. He's a great guy to caddie for, a fun guy to be around. How can you not like him? He's the same guy off the course that he is on the course. He's a really likable guy. I mean, everybody out there loves him. I'm happy to have the job. Q: Since you had known him so long, how did the caddying job come about?
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2002
James Mason nearly maxed out every one of his credit cards chasing his dream to be a professional golfer. Clyde Hughey once got the last invite to a tournament, and then had to catch a red-eye flight across the country just so he could tee off at dawn, without having slept a wink. Doug Johnson got so frustrated with his game after failing 19 times in qualifying school to make the PGA Tour, he quit to teach lessons at a course in Florida, but returned to give his dream another shot when he turned 50. Welcome to life at the bottom of the money list on the Senior PGA Tour.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
In truth, it wasn't all that long ago that Tom Watson wanted the Senior PGA Tour about as much as he wanted a case of the stomach flu. He still had some game left, he figured, even at 50. And though the tour's slumping television ratings desperately cried out for new blood, Watson wasn't all that interested in being its savior when he became eligible. After all, why would a fierce competitor, recognized as one of the game's greatest players, want to compete in tournaments where the three-day totals often reach 20-under par?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
The 2002 U.S. Senior Open at Caves Valley lost its biggest draw yesterday when Jack Nicklaus was forced to withdraw with a back injury. The news that Nicklaus had pulled out of the $2.5 million major championship, scheduled to begin Thursday at Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills, didn't come as a surprise to those familiar with the 62-year-old legend's ongoing physical problems. It marks the second time this year that Nicklaus couldn't play in a major because of his recurring back troubles.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
When Larry Laoretti decided to leave his job as a head pro at a country club in Long Island, N.Y., to try qualifying for the Senior PGA Tour in fall 1989, he heard the doubts of his peers following him. Some of them didn't even whisper. "A lot of them were saying, `What, are you nuts?' " Laoretti recalled recently. "They were saying, `You can't even beat anyone around here and you think you're going to beat a bunch of guys who played the regular tour?' " Laoretti's dream - or even fantasy - turned into one of golf's most heartwarming stories three years later, when he won the 1992 Senior Open at Saucon Valley Country Club in Bethlehem, Pa. The mention of his name evoked a different reaction among his former colleagues.
SPORTS
May 28, 1998
State Farm ClassicTour: Senior PGAWhere: Hobbit's Glen, ColumbiaWhen: July 3-5Purse: $1.25 million (First, $187,000)Defender: New eventYardage: 6,975 yards, par 72Tickets: Season (includes practice rounds) $80; daily tournament daily practice rounds (Monday-Tuesday) $10; (Wednesday-Thursday) $15. Information available from 410-964-0900Pub Date: 5/28/98
SPORTS
April 6, 1991
THE WOODLANDS, Texas -- PGA Tour and tournament officials canceled the $1 million Independent Insurance Agent Open yesterday and rescheduled it for Oct. 23-26, after steady rain washed out the first two rounds.It was the first PGA Tour event canceled since the 1966 Houston Open that was rescheduled in November and won by Arnold Palmer.Tomorrow's nationally televised final round will be replaced by a 48-man team scramble with 16 three-man teams competing for $100,000 in prizes.Senior PGA TraditionSCOTTSDALE, Ariz.
NEWS
By Ben Piven and Ben Piven,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
Baltimore County residents might notice heavier traffic than usual or experience tie-ups for the duration of two professional golf tournaments at area clubs this week and next. The Greater Baltimore Classic at Hayfields Country Club could hamper traffic in Hunt Valley today through Sunday. The 23rd Senior Open may cause traffic difficulties for commuters in the neighborhood surrounding Caves Valley Golf Club beginning Monday for a week. "Baltimore County and the state police have worked on this before," said Ray Daue, executive director of the Greater Baltimore Classic.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
If experience counts for anything at this weekend's Greater Baltimore Classic, consider golfer Clyde Hughey a serious contender. We're not talking about golfing experience, of course. He barely has a lick of that. At least, that is, compared to some of the seasoned pros and major champions set to tee it up Friday at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley. But life experience? You can bet Hughey, 53, measures up well against anyone. "I didn't grow up on a country club and never played on a golf team," said Hughey, one of 78 Senior PGA players scheduled to compete in the three-day tournament.
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