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By New York Times News Service | December 9, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Two new government reports have sharply criticized the management of the Internal Revenue Service, saying misconduct by some senior officials threatens the integrity of the tax collection system.IRS officials said that while the ethical lapses were not widespread, those that were uncovered have shocked the zTC agency into making changes aimed at ending corruption and misbehavior among its employees.Much of the soul-searching by the agency was prompted by a 2 1/2 -year investigation of misconduct begun in 1988 by the House Government Operations Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer and Monetary Affairs, led by Representative Doug Barnard Jr., D-Ga.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
The University of Maryland, College Park suffered a second cyberattack on the heels of the recent theft of personal data for hundreds of thousands of students, staff and alumni, university officials announced Thursday. Ann G. Wylie, who chairs a newly formed task force on cybersecurity, wrote in a note to the campus community that the personal information of "one senior university official" had been compromised in a breach Saturday. Wylie said the breach was "unrelated" to last month's cyberattack, in which a database with the Social Security numbers, dates of birth, names and other information of nearly 300,000 was invaded by hackers.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - Two senior U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday that there are growing signs that suggest Osama bin Laden is dead. The two officials - one from the FBI, the other from the CIA, both speaking on the condition of anonymity - stressed that neither knew of any concrete evidence. But they said several indications, some of which they would not discuss, seem to point to the likelihood of bin Laden's death. The officials disclosed for the first time, for example, that U.S. forces captured members of bin Laden's personal security force.
NEWS
March 5, 2010
A high-ranking Baltimore police official stepped down this week, police confirmed. Chief Ann Wells, a civilian who was one of the highest-ranking members of the Police Department's administrative bureau, resigned Tuesday. Anthony Guglielmi, the department's chief spokesman, said he could not elaborate on the circumstances surrounding her departure, citing restrictions on personnel matters. Wells declined to comment. The department's top ranks have thinned in recent years, with several command-level positions kept open after departures.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - An Iraqi investigative judge presented to a judiciary panel yesterday the first charges in the coming trials of senior officials of Saddam Hussein's government. The charges, for crimes against humanity, were brought against five high-ranking members of the old government in the equivalent of a grand jury hearing. The men are accused of being responsible for the 1982 crackdown on residents of the mostly Shiite village of Dujail, more than 35 miles north of Baghdad. The most prominent man charged was Barzan Ibrahim al-Hassan al-Tikriti, a half brother of Saddam Hussein and a former director of the intelligence service.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
WASHINGTON - U.S. and allied combat troops will withhold efforts to destroy Afghanistan's narcotics industry, which finances the Taliban insurgency, unless Afghan government forces take the lead, a senior military officer said yesterday. But with the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai widely believed to be riven with corruption and its army and police units unable to conduct complex operations, the drug industry has flourished virtually untouched, military officers said. Senior civilian and military officials have acknowledged that the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, launched by President George W. Bush weeks after the Sept.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Nearly all senior staff members of the Food and Drug Administration who sought permission to consult, lecture or perform other activities outside the agency from 2000 to 2003 filed incomplete applications, making it difficult to determine whether the work created conflicts of interest, according to a government review released yesterday. The agency approved almost half the applications after the activities had begun, said the report by the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 30, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Senior officials of the agency that conducted the botched raid on a cult near Waco, Texas, in February were "too detached" from the operation, leaving the main decisions to agents who had no training in large paramilitary missions, internal investigators reviewing the operation have found.The findings, part of a review to be made public in mid-September, cast new doubt on the future of Stephen E. Higgins, the longtime director of the agency, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, a division of the Treasury Department.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
Once again, attempts by federal agents to cover up evidence of bungling by senior officials has brought greater scandal and disgrace to their agency and its leadership.The shooting of an adolescent boy and his mother during a confrontation on a remote Idaho ridge three years ago raised serious questions about the judgment of FBI supervisors controlling the operation. It has long been clear that responsible officials suppressed evidence regarding their behavior, drawing bitter complaints from federal prosecutors and a federal judge, not to mention feeding the paranoid fantasies of the radical right.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A Justice Department report on the fire that consumed a cult compound near Waco, Texas, and killed most of the group's members criticizes mid- and lower-level federal agents who recommended that negotiations be abandoned in favor of a tear gas assault, according to law-enforcement and administration officials who have read the report.But the report is said to clear senior officials from the FBI and Attorney General Janet Reno of making any significant mistakes, even though Ms. Reno, acting on the advice of the senior bureau officials, ordered the assault on April 19 in which armored vehicles punched holes in the compound and filled it with tear gas.The Justice Department report is the administration's second assessment of the government's handling of the cult.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | January 24, 2009
WASHINGTON - U.S. and allied combat troops will withhold efforts to destroy Afghanistan's narcotics industry, which finances the Taliban insurgency, unless Afghan government forces take the lead, a senior military officer said yesterday. But with the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai widely believed to be riven with corruption and its army and police units unable to conduct complex operations, the drug industry has flourished virtually untouched, military officers said. Senior civilian and military officials have acknowledged that the U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, launched by President George W. Bush weeks after the Sept.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 5, 2008
Maryland's medevac program this year implemented changes designed to reduce unnecessary use of state police helicopters, a senior official told lawmakers in Annapolis this morning. Patients who are within a 30-minute drive to a trauma center must now be transported by ambulance, unless there are "extenuating" circumstances, said Dr. Robert R. Bass, head of Maryland's emergency medical response network. He also said paramedics will no longer automatically send to trauma centers patients who have been involved in automobile roll-over accidents, high-speed crashes, vehicle extractions lasting longer than 20 minutes and other situations that were formerly believed to indicate a high likelihood of serious injury.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2008
BAGHDAD -- More than 1,000 Iraqi soldiers and policemen either refused to fight or simply abandoned their posts during the inconclusive assault against Shiite militias in Basra last week, a senior Iraqi government official said yesterday. Iraqi military officials said the group included dozens of officers, including at least two senior field commanders in the battle. The desertions in the heat of a major battle cast fresh doubt on the effectiveness of the U.S.-trained Iraqi security forces.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Pakistani authorities said yesterday that they had captured a senior Taliban commander, critically wounding him in a shootout after he crossed into Pakistan from southern Afghanistan. Mansoor Dadullah, whose more prominent brother Mullah Dadullah was killed by U.S. forces last year in Afghanistan, was captured after he and a small band of fighters encountered a contingent of Pakistani troops in the southwest province of Baluchistan, the Pakistani army said. Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said Dadullah was captured alive but was badly wounded in a firefight.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 2, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- After a violent week that claimed the lives of about 500 Iraqis and the weekend combat deaths of six American soldiers, U.S. and Iraqi military officials acknowledged yesterday that it will take time for the effects of the security crackdown in Iraq to be felt. The U.S. military said two U.S. troops were killed yesterday evening by a roadside bomb southwest of Baghdad, and four others died in the same area a short time later in an apparent ambush laid for would-be rescuers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Union imposed a freeze yesterday on bank accounts and other financial assets of President Alexander Lukashenko and 35 other senior officials in Belarus, along with their families or proxies, in retaliation for a rigged presidential election in March and the crackdown on government opponents that has continued in its aftermath. The freeze follows a ban on travel to the EU's 25 member states; the United States also officially imposed a travel ban earlier this week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- The European Union imposed a freeze yesterday on bank accounts and other financial assets of President Alexander Lukashenko and 35 other senior officials in Belarus, along with their families or proxies, in retaliation for a rigged presidential election in March and the crackdown on government opponents that has continued in its aftermath. The freeze follows a ban on travel to the EU's 25 member states; the United States also officially imposed a travel ban earlier this week.
NEWS
By PAUL WATSON and PAUL WATSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 2005
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Interior Minister Ali Ahmad Jalali, one of the most respected members of President Hamid Karzai's Cabinet, resigned yesterday after complaining for months that some senior officials were involved in drugs and corruption. Jalali announced his resignation in an interview with a private Afghan television station but was evasive about his reasons for stepping down. "I will not work as Interior minister anymore," Jalali told Tolo TV. "One of the main reasons is that I wish to resume my academic research.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
Gerald "Gerry" Gore spotted the bright orange flame on a balcony railing of an apartment building as he exited Interstate 795 on the morning after Christmas. The Union Mills resident pulled over and called 911. He then ran down an embankment, climbed a tree to get over a fence and pounded on doors until someone let him in. Gore said this week that he "sort of panicked a little bit" when he looked down. "I saw I was standing on a retirement community welcome mat," he said. Gore was honored yesterday, along with county workers, business and community leaders and others who helped evacuate the Meadows at Reisterstown senior apartments and later settled more than five dozen residents in new homes.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Nearly all senior staff members of the Food and Drug Administration who sought permission to consult, lecture or perform other activities outside the agency from 2000 to 2003 filed incomplete applications, making it difficult to determine whether the work created conflicts of interest, according to a government review released yesterday. The agency approved almost half the applications after the activities had begun, said the report by the Department of Health and Human Services inspector general.
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