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By Sports Digest | September 25, 2010
Women's basketball U.S. beats Senegal, 108-52, at FIBA championships The Atlanta Dream's Angel McCoughtry (St. Frances) had nine points, four rebounds and four steals, and the USA Basketball women's world championship team (2-0) dominated Senegal (0-2) from start to finish on its way to a 108-52 win in preliminary round play of the 2010 FIBA World Championship on Friday evening in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Six players tallied double figures in points for the USA, and all 12 players on the U.S. roster scored and grabbed at least one rebound.
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NEWS
February 5, 2014
Doris Ligon may be Baltimore born and bred, but she can't seem to get her mind off Africa. "I was in my 30s before I heard anything positive about Africa," recalls Ligon, 77, who, along with her late husband, Claude, opened the African Art Museum of Maryland in Columbia in 1980. Since 2011, the museum has held forth closer to Laurel, in cozy space in Maple Lawn, just off the lobby of the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church. "In those days, it was called the Dark Continent.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 21, 1992
As a former colony of France, now an independent nation whose official language is French, the West African nation of Senegal has long ties to Europe and one should not be surprised to see a European influence in its contemporary art.One does, in a current show of seven Senegalese artists at the Montpelier Cultural Arts Center. But the more successful of these artists use elements of what can be interpreted as European style in order to deal with deeper concerns. When style itself comes more to the fore, as it does with other artists here, the work comes off as less essential and more superficial.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
There were at least 10 Division I basketball programs that wanted Iba Camara . Several more from the Atlantic 10 and Colonial Athletic Association hoped that the St. Paul's senior would wait until spring to sign his letter of intent. But for Camara, everything about his recruitment became clear when he visited New Hampshire earlier this month. “What I really liked about it is when I met this kid who is from Nigeria,” Camara, a native of Senegal, said of Wildcats freshman forward Williams Gabriel . “He couldn't speak a word of English.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 2, 1998
A group of women sits in the searing African sun, their silence a potent, unmoving rebuke to the French soldiers who are holding them hostage for rice. An African princess, bathing in the ocean, is wordlessly captured by two of her Wolof brethren, who wish to protest their tribe's conversion to Islam by kidnapping their leader's daughter.These are just two of the striking images from "Emitai" and "Ceddo," two rarely seen films by the Senegalese director Ousmane Sembene, which open for a week's run tonight at the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
HARTFORD, Conn. -- Two natives of Dakar, Senegal -- North Carolina 6-foot-10 senior Makhtar Ndiaye and Navy 6-7 sophomore Sitapha Savane -- will be matching muscles under the boards when the Tar Heels and Midshipmen meet in the 1998 NCAA tournament opener today."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 23, 2004
MALIKA, Senegal - The 55 students enrolled in Marie Therese Gomis' life skills center in this shabby city on the Atlantic Ocean face many of the risks that have allowed HIV/ AIDS to ravage the African continent, infecting one in five adults. They are young, poor and illiterate; they live in a culture where polygamy is widely practiced. They are also female, making them 2.5 times as likely to become infected than men their age, according to the World Health Organization. But in Senegal, odds are that these students, ages 12 to 18, will be spared the scourge of AIDS.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 30, 2004
GOREE ISLAND, Senegal - Standing in a narrow doorway opening onto the Atlantic Ocean, tour guide Aladji Ndiaye asked a visitor to this Senegalese island's Slave House to imagine the millions of shackled Africans who stepped through it, forced onto overcrowded ships that would carry them to lives of slavery in the Americas. "After walking through the door, it was bye-bye, Africa," said Ndiaye, pausing before solemnly pointing to the choppy waters below. "Many would try to escape. Those who did died.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
SERIGNE SALIOU MBACKE, 92 Spiritual leader of Senegal Serigne Saliou Mbacke, Senegal's spiritual leader, whose image was ever-present in the lives of his countrymen, has died. Four million people - nearly a third of the West African country's population - were expected to make a pilgrimage to Mr. Mbacke's grave over the weekend, said national police chief Assane Ndoye. Mr. Mbacke was the leader of the Mourides, the most powerful Muslim brotherhood in Senegal. He died Friday and was buried Saturday.
SPORTS
September 23, 1993
Auto racing2 Thunder -- Named Ed Kennedy equipment manager.OlympicsInternational Olympic Committee -- Re-elected president Juan Antonio Samaranch, 73, of Spain to another four-year term. Re-elected Anita DeFrantz of the United States to a four-year term on the 11-person executive board. Elected Marc Hodler of Switzerland, president of the international ski federation, vice president. Elected Keba Mbaye of Senegal to the executive board for one year.SoccerWichita Wings (NPSL) -- Re-signed F Chico Borja and G Nat Gonzalez to one-year deals and G Kris Peat to a two-year deal.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | September 25, 2010
Women's basketball U.S. beats Senegal, 108-52, at FIBA championships The Atlanta Dream's Angel McCoughtry (St. Frances) had nine points, four rebounds and four steals, and the USA Basketball women's world championship team (2-0) dominated Senegal (0-2) from start to finish on its way to a 108-52 win in preliminary round play of the 2010 FIBA World Championship on Friday evening in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Six players tallied double figures in points for the USA, and all 12 players on the U.S. roster scored and grabbed at least one rebound.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 2008
DAKAR, Senegal -- Congo's government reached an agreement yesterday with a renegade general to end an insurgency that has forced more than 400,000 people from their homes and threatened to undermine the new democratically elected government, according to Congolese officials and Western diplomats involved in the negotiations. Under the terms of the agreement, which was completed yesterday and is expected to be signed today after nearly two weeks of difficult negotiations in the eastern city of Goma, the government and the rebel troops will withdraw from some of their positions and United Nations peacekeeping forces will establish a buffer zone.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
SERIGNE SALIOU MBACKE, 92 Spiritual leader of Senegal Serigne Saliou Mbacke, Senegal's spiritual leader, whose image was ever-present in the lives of his countrymen, has died. Four million people - nearly a third of the West African country's population - were expected to make a pilgrimage to Mr. Mbacke's grave over the weekend, said national police chief Assane Ndoye. Mr. Mbacke was the leader of the Mourides, the most powerful Muslim brotherhood in Senegal. He died Friday and was buried Saturday.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
Sometime during the early hours of Aug. 10, just after British authorities had arrested a group of people suspected of plotting to blow up several commercial airliners over the Atlantic Ocean, cell phones and laptops around the globe got an urgent message: "U.K. airports placed on critical alert Aug. 10 after discovery of alleged terror plot on U.S.-bound flights. No carry-on luggage allowed; flight delays likely." It was from iJET, an Annapolis intelligence firm hired by multinational companies to keep them apprised of troubles that could affect their globe-trotting employees or far-flung property or suppliers.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 2005
They were introduced as the Michael Jordan of Senegalese basketball, the top female basketball player in Africa, and head of the Senegalese version of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. And on Monday, the coaches were in the media center at Centennial High School, talking to Howard County students about how to better combine sports and education in their country. "The best players in Senegal," said an enthused Luke Beckmann, a Centennial senior who plays soccer, basketball and lacrosse.
BUSINESS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 2004
DAROU SALAM DIOUF, Senegal - The tiny bundle of currency - one 500-franc Central African note folded carefully around two 100-franc coins -- equals about $1.40. But Khady Mbaye clutches it in her right hand with seemingly all her might, as if she were gripping a handrail on a flight of icy steps. What would be a pocketful of loose change for millions in the world, enough to buy a cup of coffee, is for Mbaye much more. It is a solution to the riddle posed to her each morning when a shaft of sunlight falls through the window of her cinder block home: How will she survive today?
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 21, 2001
THE MEETING of the foreheads was scheduled for noon. Donna Jones Stanley, executive director of the Associated Black Charities of Maryland, sat perusing a menu in a booth at the Polo Grill restaurant, a stylish eatery located in the Inn at the Colonnade, which is ensconced across the street from the esteemed and prestigious Johns Hopkins University. About 12:10 p.m., in walked a certain Sun columnist known for several things, most notably the size of his forehead. This would be a meeting of two friends who would engage in a conversation that touched on slavery, feminism, reparations, Africa, race and ethnicity.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 30, 2004
GOREE ISLAND, Senegal - Standing in a narrow doorway opening onto the Atlantic Ocean, tour guide Aladji Ndiaye asked a visitor to this Senegalese island's Slave House to imagine the millions of shackled Africans who stepped through it, forced onto overcrowded ships that would carry them to lives of slavery in the Americas. "After walking through the door, it was bye-bye, Africa," said Ndiaye, pausing before solemnly pointing to the choppy waters below. "Many would try to escape. Those who did died.
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