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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 17, 1998
SENECA FALLS, N.Y. -- This is where it all began. Exactly 150 years ago, on July 19, 1848, when nearly 300 people gathered at the center of this blue-collar mill town to give birth to the women's rights movement.Women and men, Quakers and other abolitionists, sat within these two brick walls that are all that remain now of the Wesleyan Chapel. Here they listened to the Declaration of Sentiments:"We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal . . ."To understand just how radical this notion was, how audacious the first women's rights convention was, consider the state of women in mid-19th-century America.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Ann M. Rayner, who worked for Laureate Education Inc. in Baltimore for a decade, died Oct. 4 of brain cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 53. Ann Marie Ritter was born in Waterloo, N.Y., and raised in Seneca Falls, N.Y., where she graduated in 1978 from Mynderse Academy High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from the State University of New York in Geneseo in 1982 and a master's degree in higher education from Walden University, an online university, this year.
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TRAVEL
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
The women arrive in Seneca Falls, N.Y., in everything from minivans to Mercedes, Birkenstocks to bobby socks, almost always with girls in tow. They might be manicured moms, aunts in tie-dye or grandmothers in track suits, but their mission is the same, their words variations on this theme: "It wasn't always like it is today." They want the younger ones to get it, to see what they have and to know how it was gotten. Seneca Falls, an upstate New York village and former mill town trying to remake itself as a stop on the history trail and the Erie Canal, is home to a unique national park -- the Women's Rights National Historical Park -- several historic homes and the National Women's Hall of Fame.
NEWS
November 20, 2003
On November 18, 2003, MARY M. (nee Shipley), beloved wife of Robert M. Herrmann, Jr., devoted mother of Robert W. and his wife Patricia Herrmann of Glen Burnie, Sandra J. and her husband Kenneth M. Bohman of Seneca Falls, NY and the late Michael E. Herrmann. Loving grandmother of Kenneth M. Bohman, Jr. of Seneca Falls, NY and Karen M. Bohman of Palisades Park, NJ. Dear sister of Margaret and her husband Wilson Billingsley and Lorraine King all of Baltimore, dear sister-in-law of Mary North of Baltimore and Shirley Shipley of Abingdon.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
What happened for women in Seneca Falls in July 1848 has been compared in importance to what happened for men in Philadelphia in July 1776 -- in creating citizenship in the world's first modern democracy.True, there was no bloodshed in the revolution born in the Methodist chapel of a small town in upstate New York. And the journey launched took a lot longer than that of the Founding Fathers.But there were echoes of what Thomas Jefferson and John Adams called the "spirit of '76": The first women's rights convention, held in Seneca Falls in 1848, involved both a tea party and a declaration.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
On May 12, 2003 MICHAEL E. HERRMANN; loving husband of Vickie Herrmann; son of Robert and Dolly Herrmann; brother of Robert W. Herrmann, and Sandra J. Bohman, of Seneca Falls, NY. Visiting hours, Thursday, 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., and Services, 8 P.M., at Stallings Funeral Home, 3111 Mountain Rd., Pasadena.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Ann M. Rayner, who worked for Laureate Education Inc. in Baltimore for a decade, died Oct. 4 of brain cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 53. Ann Marie Ritter was born in Waterloo, N.Y., and raised in Seneca Falls, N.Y., where she graduated in 1978 from Mynderse Academy High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from the State University of New York in Geneseo in 1982 and a master's degree in higher education from Walden University, an online university, this year.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1997
SENECA FALLS, N.Y. -- Angels in white lights hover above Bedford Falls Boulevard. George Bailey waves to the town from a second-floor shop window. Two blocks away, a bronze plaque marks a familiar steel truss bridge where, 51 Christmas Eves ago, George contemplated suicide before he realized that his had been a wonderful life."
FEATURES
By Jon Marcus and Jon Marcus,Contributing Writer | August 1, 1993
SENECA FALLS, N.Y.-- The newest historical site to be preserved by the National Park Service may shed less light on the past than on the present.The Women's Rights National Historical Park, most of which opened yesterday at the site of America's first women's rights convention, commemorates a movement still evolving."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
As far back as he can remember, Janmichael Shadd Graine knew he was related to a remarkable woman.Born a free black in 19th-century America, she fought for female suffrage and civil rights, spoke across the continent, established and edited a newspaper and at 59 graduated from Howard University's law school.For Graine, who lives in Harford County, Mary Ann Shadd Cary's accomplishments have been a source of pride. Of wonder. And -- when as a teen-ager he lost both parents -- of strength.But beyond Graine's large extended family and scholars, not many may have heard of Cary, his great-great-great aunt.
TRAVEL
By Naedine Joy Hazell and Naedine Joy Hazell,Special to the Sun | December 29, 2002
The women arrive in Seneca Falls, N.Y., in everything from minivans to Mercedes, Birkenstocks to bobby socks, almost always with girls in tow. They might be manicured moms, aunts in tie-dye or grandmothers in track suits, but their mission is the same, their words variations on this theme: "It wasn't always like it is today." They want the younger ones to get it, to see what they have and to know how it was gotten. Seneca Falls, an upstate New York village and former mill town trying to remake itself as a stop on the history trail and the Erie Canal, is home to a unique national park -- the Women's Rights National Historical Park -- several historic homes and the National Women's Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | January 6, 2000
WATERLOO, N.Y. -- Ending months of uncertainty over the fate of a historic property that was central to the movement for women's rights in the United States, a nonprofit organization acquired the Hunt House in Waterloo, N.Y., at auction recently, pledging to restore it and donate it to the National Park Service. In a spirited 40-minute telephone battle among five bidders, the 1829 house was sold for $231,000 -- $91,100 above the asking price. The winner was the Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit conservation organization.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Hillary Clinton may make of herself a gift to the state of New York, which must replace Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who is retiring. So she may wish to prepare answers to the sort of questions she can expect, such as:In upstate New York (yes, Mrs. Clinton, there is such a place; it is somewhat north of the Carlyle Hotel), the industrial corridor from Schenectady-Troy to Buffalo is hurting. The corridor includes Seneca Falls, birthplace of women's suffrage, to which you have made a pilgrimage.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 17, 1998
SENECA FALLS, N.Y. -- This is where it all began. Exactly 150 years ago, on July 19, 1848, when nearly 300 people gathered at the center of this blue-collar mill town to give birth to the women's rights movement.Women and men, Quakers and other abolitionists, sat within these two brick walls that are all that remain now of the Wesleyan Chapel. Here they listened to the Declaration of Sentiments:"We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal . . ."To understand just how radical this notion was, how audacious the first women's rights convention was, consider the state of women in mid-19th-century America.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
What happened for women in Seneca Falls in July 1848 has been compared in importance to what happened for men in Philadelphia in July 1776 -- in creating citizenship in the world's first modern democracy.True, there was no bloodshed in the revolution born in the Methodist chapel of a small town in upstate New York. And the journey launched took a lot longer than that of the Founding Fathers.But there were echoes of what Thomas Jefferson and John Adams called the "spirit of '76": The first women's rights convention, held in Seneca Falls in 1848, involved both a tea party and a declaration.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
As far back as he can remember, Janmichael Shadd Graine knew he was related to a remarkable woman.Born a free black in 19th-century America, she fought for female suffrage and civil rights, spoke across the continent, established and edited a newspaper and at 59 graduated from Howard University's law school.For Graine, who lives in Harford County, Mary Ann Shadd Cary's accomplishments have been a source of pride. Of wonder. And -- when as a teen-ager he lost both parents -- of strength.But beyond Graine's large extended family and scholars, not many may have heard of Cary, his great-great-great aunt.
NEWS
By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,New York Times News Service | January 6, 2000
WATERLOO, N.Y. -- Ending months of uncertainty over the fate of a historic property that was central to the movement for women's rights in the United States, a nonprofit organization acquired the Hunt House in Waterloo, N.Y., at auction recently, pledging to restore it and donate it to the National Park Service. In a spirited 40-minute telephone battle among five bidders, the 1829 house was sold for $231,000 -- $91,100 above the asking price. The winner was the Trust for Public Land, a nonprofit conservation organization.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1997
SENECA FALLS, N.Y. -- Angels in white lights hover above Bedford Falls Boulevard. George Bailey waves to the town from a second-floor shop window. Two blocks away, a bronze plaque marks a familiar steel truss bridge where, 51 Christmas Eves ago, George contemplated suicide before he realized that his had been a wonderful life."
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