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By PETER BAKER | June 12, 1991
SENECA -- Some 25 years ago, during that confused time when some people were burning draft cards and some were waving flags, the shoreline of Seneca Creek in Montgomery County was somewhat different.Just upstream from the C&O Canal aqueduct, where Seneca Creek meets the Potomac River, a string of cabins stood and a country store sold bait and rented small boats and smaller outboard motors to those who wished to cruise or fish.These days, the cabins and the old store are gone and a ramp in a county park offers boating access to the creek and river.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
It began as a casual search for a vacation home on the water. Sue and Tom Graham's main residence was in Jacksonville in Baltimore County. Each had a demanding job, and they grew weary of spending long hours in a car driving to and from the beach on summer weekends. They soon learned however, that waterfront property in Anne Arundel County, as well as in many areas of Baltimore County, was well out of their budgeted price range. "We looked at cabins and dumps, lots and shacks that sold for $400,000," said Sue Graham, 54, a clinical nurse specialist for medical-supply company Cook Medical.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 4, 2004
Baltimore County and Maryland Natural Resources police caught a caiman Friday night that had been playing in the waters of Seneca Creek in Bowleys Quarters and making occasional appearances for about two weeks, authorities said yesterday. Using a spotlight and a large dip net, officials snagged the 27 1/2 -inch-long reptile, an alligator cousin that can legally be kept as a pet in Maryland. For more than an hour Friday, DNR and Baltimore County officials tried to catch the reptile, which surfaced near a bulkhead.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Steven Leibowitz is trying to run as fast as he can, but the trail is muddy and tree roots are hiding under the soil, slowing him down. Now there's a stream blocking his path, with no way to cross, save a few widely spaced rocks. But Leibowitz can't give up. He has to keep running. It might sound like a scene from "The Hunger Games" or "The Blair Witch Project. " But for a runner in the XTERRA Trail Run Series, it's just the path to the finish line. XTERRA, a national multisport company, puts on races that are much more than your average 5K on the street.
SPORTS
April 5, 1992
BOYDS -- As you look north from atop the railroad right of way over Little Seneca Creek, a large basin spreads toward the dam that holds back Little Seneca Lake at Black Hill Regional Park in Montgomery County.The northeastern edge of the basin is cut by Little Seneca Creek, which curves back toward the south, runs through a large culvert under the B&O right of way and meanders past Clopper, Hoyles Mill and Schaeffer roads to its juncture with Bucklodge Branch and beyond.Little Seneca Creek is a watershed in transition.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
The lizardlike creature rose again yesterday from the muddy waters of Seneca Creek in Eastern Baltimore County. No one is quite sure what it is - perhaps an alligator or, more likely, its cousin, a caiman. And no one has been able to catch the animal, which is said to be about 2 to 3 feet long and has been, according to residents, living under a gazebo and playing in the creek's waters for about two weeks. When the reptile reared its head yesterday afternoon - maybe to bask in the summer sun or to torment one of the small dogs playing near the creek's shoreline - somebody called 911. Soon, Baltimore County police and Maryland Natural Resources police swarmed the Bowleys Quarters neighborhood.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
Maryland Natural Resources police have interviewed the young fisherman who reported spying an alligator in the Patapsco River. And they say they believe him. But a preliminary search of the area late Monday failed to turn up any further evidence of the tropical reptile. "We believe the gentleman. That's why we sent an officer out to investigate," said Sgt. Art Windemuth, spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources Police. Animal control officers also joined the search. But no alligator appeared.
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG | March 24, 2000
Thought last year's grunge hit "The Blair Witch Project" ended with the deaths of its three profanity-spouting, map-losing, witch-hunting rebels? It didn't. "The Blair Witch Project 2" began filming in Maryland this month, according to Andrea Thomas, manager of the Maryland Film Commission. Barbara Garner, an assistant manager at Seneca Creek State Park in Gaithersburg, said Seneca is being used as a location. Much of the first movie was shot there as well, she says. Many people assumed the wooded scenes were shot in Burkittsville, the tiny Maryland town that became associated with the film, spawned a Blair Witch souvenir market and more recently got pillaged by rowdy Blair Witch fanatics.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2002
Montgomery County fire officials credited the quick thinking of three Thanksgiving passers-by for helping save the life of a 59-year-old truck driver stranded in waist-high water early yesterday after his gasoline tanker overturned on Interstate 270 and plunged into Seneca Creek. Robert Kinder of Hagerstown was flown to Suburban Hospital in Bethesda with what state police described as non-life-threatening injuries. He was listed in serious condition yesterday. About 5 a.m., Kinder was driving a 2000 Mack tractor-trailer south on I-270 between routes 118 and 124 in Gaithersburg when he lost control, authorities said.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
It began as a casual search for a vacation home on the water. Sue and Tom Graham's main residence was in Jacksonville in Baltimore County. Each had a demanding job, and they grew weary of spending long hours in a car driving to and from the beach on summer weekends. They soon learned however, that waterfront property in Anne Arundel County, as well as in many areas of Baltimore County, was well out of their budgeted price range. "We looked at cabins and dumps, lots and shacks that sold for $400,000," said Sue Graham, 54, a clinical nurse specialist for medical-supply company Cook Medical.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
Maryland Natural Resources police have interviewed the young fisherman who reported spying an alligator in the Patapsco River. And they say they believe him. But a preliminary search of the area late Monday failed to turn up any further evidence of the tropical reptile. "We believe the gentleman. That's why we sent an officer out to investigate," said Sgt. Art Windemuth, spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources Police. Animal control officers also joined the search. But no alligator appeared.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 4, 2004
Baltimore County and Maryland Natural Resources police caught a caiman Friday night that had been playing in the waters of Seneca Creek in Bowleys Quarters and making occasional appearances for about two weeks, authorities said yesterday. Using a spotlight and a large dip net, officials snagged the 27 1/2 -inch-long reptile, an alligator cousin that can legally be kept as a pet in Maryland. For more than an hour Friday, DNR and Baltimore County officials tried to catch the reptile, which surfaced near a bulkhead.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2004
The lizardlike creature rose again yesterday from the muddy waters of Seneca Creek in eastern Baltimore County. No one is quite sure what it is - perhaps an alligator or, more likely, its cousin, a caiman. And no one has been able to catch the animal, which is said to be about 2 to 3 feet long and has been, according to residents, living under a gazebo and playing in the creek's waters for about two weeks. When the reptile reared its head yesterday afternoon - maybe to bask in the summer sun or to torment one of the small dogs playing near the creek's shoreline - somebody called 911. Soon, Baltimore County police and Maryland Natural Resources Police swarmed the Bowleys Quarters neighborhood.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2002
Montgomery County fire officials credited the quick thinking of three Thanksgiving passers-by for helping save the life of a 59-year-old truck driver stranded in waist-high water early yesterday after his gasoline tanker overturned on Interstate 270 and plunged into Seneca Creek. Robert Kinder of Hagerstown was flown to Suburban Hospital in Bethesda with what state police described as non-life-threatening injuries. He was listed in serious condition yesterday. About 5 a.m., Kinder was driving a 2000 Mack tractor-trailer south on I-270 between routes 118 and 124 in Gaithersburg when he lost control, authorities said.
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG | March 24, 2000
Thought last year's grunge hit "The Blair Witch Project" ended with the deaths of its three profanity-spouting, map-losing, witch-hunting rebels? It didn't. "The Blair Witch Project 2" began filming in Maryland this month, according to Andrea Thomas, manager of the Maryland Film Commission. Barbara Garner, an assistant manager at Seneca Creek State Park in Gaithersburg, said Seneca is being used as a location. Much of the first movie was shot there as well, she says. Many people assumed the wooded scenes were shot in Burkittsville, the tiny Maryland town that became associated with the film, spawned a Blair Witch souvenir market and more recently got pillaged by rowdy Blair Witch fanatics.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 28, 1996
GAITHERSBURG -- Nestled among the pine trees in Seneca Creek State Park is a patch of lush greenery, with spice bush, honeysuckle and wild rose.Another spot like this is hard to find in the park's almost 6,000 acres. The deer, numbering 100 per square mile in some sections, have eaten almost everything."Things are out of sync," says Ken D'Loughy, a program manager for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.When deer consume forest underbrush, they destroy habitat food and shelter - for many birds, rabbits and other animals, D'Loughy observes.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
Steven Leibowitz is trying to run as fast as he can, but the trail is muddy and tree roots are hiding under the soil, slowing him down. Now there's a stream blocking his path, with no way to cross, save a few widely spaced rocks. But Leibowitz can't give up. He has to keep running. It might sound like a scene from "The Hunger Games" or "The Blair Witch Project. " But for a runner in the XTERRA Trail Run Series, it's just the path to the finish line. XTERRA, a national multisport company, puts on races that are much more than your average 5K on the street.
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