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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
It's about 10 a.m. and Waymon Le Fall is making his first cuts of the day at his barbershop in West Baltimore.Le Fall's shop, at the corner of Edmondson Avenue and Bruce Street, is a hub for talk about everything social, religious and political.Yesterday was typical and the topic was hot -- the recommendation of the General Assembly's ethics committee to strip state Sen. Larry Young of virtually all his legislative influence and for the Senate to call a vote for his expulsion.While opinions varied throughout the city and the state about the senator and the allegations -- some firmly in support of Young, others glad to see the senator under scrutiny -- those at Le Fall's barbershop, which is located in Young's 44th District, made their positions clear.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
As news of a nine-count indictment against former state Sen. Larry Young flashed across television screens yesterday at Mondawmin Mall, several shoppers and workers shook their heads in disappointment."
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
State Sen. Larry Young's alleged ethical sins could end his legislative career -- and threaten the political future of other Democratic officials, including Gov. Parris N. Glendening.As Del. Howard P. Rawlings of Baltimore put it said yesterday: "It hurts us all."Young's problems will form the centerpiece of anti-Glendening broadsides that could endure throughout this year's primary and general election campaigns, and the shooting started yesterday.In separate forums, Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann, challenging Glendening in the Democratic primary, and the Republican Party's 1994 gubernatorial candidate, Ellen R. Sauerbrey, accused the governor yesterday of setting the tone for Young by aggressively raising funds among health care corporations.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
Former state Sen. Larry Young, once one of Maryland's most powerful and promising politicians, was charged in a nine-count bribery and extortion indictment yesterday with using his office to shake down a pair of minority-owned health care companies for more than $72,000.The indictment was handed up by an Anne Arundel grand jury after a yearlong investigation by State Prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli that included testimony from dozens of witnesses, including the last-minute appearance yesterday of the governor's chief of staff, Major F. Riddick Jr.The charges against Young are the latest development in a scandal that resulted in his ouster from the Senate, the first such expulsion in more than two centuries in Maryland.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
State Sen. Larry Young's likely expulsion from the Senate today would set off a process for filling the vacancy that is spelled out clearly in the Maryland Constitution -- but is more commonly a straight political deal worked out behind closed doors.Technically, a vacancy in the Maryland Senate or House of Delegates is filled by the party central committee for the district. Its recommendation is forwarded to the governor, who is bound to appoint the person named.As a practical matter, though, the five members of the Democratic State Central Committee from Young's West Baltimore district -- the 44th Legislative District -- are loyal to Young.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Ivan Penn, Lisa Respers, Kate Shatzkin and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | January 14, 1998
As a grand jury began subpoenaing records as part of a criminal probe into Sen. Larry Young and the FBI announced plans to examine the case yesterday, the lawmaker defiantly told his supporters he will take his "people's seat" in the Senate at the start of the legislative session today.In his first public comments since a state ethics committee recommended that he face an expulsion vote for using his office for personal gain, Young told hundreds of supporters last night that he changed his decision after a heartfelt conversation with his mother, Mable Payne.
NEWS
December 16, 1997
PEARLY BLUE JR. certainly was busy this past summer and fall. While holding down a full-time, 40-hour a week city sanitation job, he also spent his days and nights acting as chauffeur for state Sen. Larry Young, who said he personally paid the driver for his services. When the sanitation job ended, Mr. Young persuaded a fellow legislator in his West Baltimore district to put Mr. Blue on her state payroll -- even as the driver continued to transport Mr. Young to his numerous appointments.This latest revelation from Sun reporters Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham raises new questions about Senator Young's activities and the apparent lack of a firm dividing wall between his duties as a powerful state legislator and his personal business enterprises.
NEWS
January 12, 1998
Blame system for problems, instead of YoungHarold A. Carter Sr., pastor of New Shiloh Baptist Church, Alfred C. D. Vaughn, pastor of Sharon Baptist Church, senior leaders in the clergy community in this state and I journeyed to Annapolis to stand shoulder to shoulder with Sen. Larry Young during his appearance before the Senate Ethics Committee.We held a prayer service and marched with him and 50 others to the Senate Office Building, where 12 men and women gathered to consider testimony and to rule on his fate as a state senator and a person.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
Defenders of state Sen. Larry Young picketed The Sun yesterday, demanding "truthful" coverage of questions raised about his business and political activities, and promising to disrupt the General Assembly if Young is removed from the two Senate committees he chairs.About 40 demonstrators marched in front of the Calvert Street offices at noon, singing the civil rights anthem "We Shall Overcome," waving placards and accusing the newspaper of a vendetta against the Baltimore Democrat and other African-American public officials.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
As news of a nine-count indictment against former state Sen. Larry Young flashed across television screens yesterday at Mondawmin Mall, several shoppers and workers shook their heads in disappointment."
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
Almost a month after his expulsion from the Maryland Senate, an exuberant Larry Young won the recommendation last night of a Democratic Party committee to regain his seat for the rest of his term."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1998
In the end, it was an unlikely character who successfully defended the legislature's ethics committee report on Larry Young through an emotional, hours-long exchange on the floor of the Maryland Senate.Not a lawyer, not one of the Senate's inside players, not one of its shining stars -- Sen. Michael J. Collins is an at-times prickly, 57-year-old retired high school history teacher from Essex who rarely, if ever, in his three terms has been called upon to lead the Senate through such a weighty matter.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers JoAnna Daemmrich, Michael Dresser and Scott Shane and news assistant Jill L. Kubatko contributed to this article | January 17, 1998
In a wrenching vote that lawmakers said was the most agonizing of their careers, Larry Young was expelled from the Maryland Senate yesterday for using his public office for private gain.The Senate voted 36-10 to expel the West Baltimore Democrat, the first time in 201 years that a Maryland lawmaker has been removed by his colleagues.After the result was known, Young sat quietly in his chair for a few moments, then walked through a phalanx of photographers and out of the chamber where he has served for a decade.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and Peter Jensen and C. Fraser Smith and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | January 17, 1998
In the beginning, Larry Young had almost everything a legislator needs: a knack for the political game, respected mentors who could help him move up and the ability to master complicated material."
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Robert Guy Matthews and Craig Timberg and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Jonathan Weisman, Brenda J. Buote and Stacey P. Patton contributed to this article | January 17, 1998
Baltimoreans greeted the news of Larry Young's expulsion from the state Senate yesterday with more sadness than anger, more weariness than surprise. And many wondered whether his transgressions point to broader ethical troubles among legislators."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1998
Larry Young laid the groundwork for a potential court challenge of his expulsion from the Maryland Senate yesterday, but at the same time raised new questions about the outside consulting business he's been running out of his district office.Acting as his own attorney and chief witness, the 48-year-old from West Baltimore repeatedly cited a letter and other evidence he said the Joint Legislative Ethics Committee had failed to consider when deciding to recommend his removal."I believe that this letter completely exonerates me," said Young, citing a Jan. 8 letter written by Coppin State College President Calvin W. Burnett.
NEWS
January 8, 1998
Truth, not con game, is Young's best defenseThe shell game and three-card Molly are con games well-known to African Americans older than the Generation Xers. The efforts of state Sen. Larry Young as reported (Dec. 30, "Supporters of Young hold 'Rally for Truth,' " and Dec. 31, "Young's supporters picket newspaper,") are glaring examples of attempts to have that which might not be truth create the perception of truth.On occasions when I have been dubiously privileged to hear Senator Young speak to community groups, he has never been hesitant to evoke emotional responses by quoting Bible scriptures in his best evangelical style.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
A fired liquor board inspector said yesterday she was willing to take a lie detector test to back up claims in a lawsuit that state Sen. Larry Young knew of Kenneth A. "Kenny Bird" Jackson's criminal background even as the senator supported the granting of a liquor license for a nightclub Jackson planned.Marion P. Turner invited Young, whom she describes as a "lifetime friend," to take a polygraph test himself. Young could not be reached for comment yesterday. He has denied knowing about Jackson's background at the time he supported the application.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Scott Higham and Thomas W. Waldron and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers C. Fraser Smith and Walter F. Roche Jr. contributed to this article | January 16, 1998
Despite last-minute pleas for leniency, the Maryland Senate is expected to vote today to expel Sen. Larry Young for ethics transgressions.Fourteen black delegates from the Baltimore area sent a letter yesterday calling on Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller to halt the expulsion vote, saying such a penalty would be too severe.And hundreds of Young's supporters, prodded by talk-radio hosts, flooded Miller's phones -- both in the State House and at his home in Prince George's County -- demanding that the Senate delay the vote for a week.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
State Sen. Larry Young's likely expulsion from the Senate today would set off a process for filling the vacancy that is spelled out clearly in the Maryland Constitution -- but is more commonly a straight political deal worked out behind closed doors.Technically, a vacancy in the Maryland Senate or House of Delegates is filled by the party central committee for the district. Its recommendation is forwarded to the governor, who is bound to appoint the person named.As a practical matter, though, the five members of the Democratic State Central Committee from Young's West Baltimore district -- the 44th Legislative District -- are loyal to Young.
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