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NEWS
February 16, 1993
Nobody ever said the Federal Reserve Board was perfect. Indeed, prize-winning economists spanning the ideological spectrum are complaining that the Fed prolonged the Bush recession by keeping interest rates too high. No doubt George Bush would agree. But do these complaints justify efforts on Capitol Hill to place tighter congressional controls on the nation's central bankers?We think not. Having botched fiscal policy over a large number of years, Congress should be wary of trying to control monetary policy.
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NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Earlier this year, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes won applause from consumer advocates for drafting a bill to bar banks from selling their customers' financial data to other companies without the customers' consent.Now, with the senior Maryland Democrat playing an active role in shaping separate legislation dear to the banking industry, Sarbanes is facing criticism from an unexpected source: those same consumer advocates.Intent on preserving requirements that banks expand lending in low-income neighborhoods, Sarbanes appears ready to yield to industry demands that the bill exclude the very consumer protections that the senator had pushed for earlier.
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NEWS
November 30, 1994
Tomorrow, Sen. Paul Sarbanes has a chance to redeem his 1993 vote on the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he opposed in a shortsighted attempt to placate organized labor. The issue this time is the ponderous but vital General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Following last night's strong show of support from the House of Representatives, the Senate takes up GATT, where the issue remains in some doubt. Unlike the vote on NAFTA, where Senate ratification was certain even without Mr. Sarbanes' support, the Democrat's "aye" could be critical this time.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After her left hand was injured in a struggle with a mugger last fall, Barbara A. Mikulski joked that she and her colleague Paul S. Sarbanes were a "three-fisted senatorial team."But while the two Maryland Democrats have tried to deliver one-two punches to Republican initiatives to scale back federal spending -- on Medicare and Medicaid for instance -- they also have staked out their own individual corners in the Republican-led Congress.The two have always been different sorts of Democrats.
NEWS
October 31, 1994
Two hours of debate on two successive nights between Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes and his Republican challenger, William E. Brock III, confirm the view of this newspaper that Mr. Sarbanes is the stronger candidate. In a year when incumbents are under attack, Senator Sarbanes went over to the offensive and was able to stay there despite the fumbling best efforts of his opponent.Mr. Brock, a man with distinguished past service as a legislator and Cabinet officer, simply was unable to make a strong case why he should replace Mr. Sarbanes in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Carroll Transit officials are likely to get most of the things on their wish list, now that $9.7 million in federal money has been approved to help bus systems in Maryland.The money, $3.5 million to $4 million of which will be sharedamong several Maryland subdivisions, was appropriated by the Senate last week and approved by the president Sept. 30, said Bill Toohey, spokesman for Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes.About $6 million goes to the Mass Transit Administration to buy buses and to improve some MTA facilities, he said.
NEWS
March 11, 1994
Sen. Paul Sarbanes says his Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee should not get involved in the Whitewater affair. He accused Republicans in the Congress and in Maryland, who called on him and the committee to hold hearings, of "seizing upon it [Whitewater] in a highly partisan way."Imagine -- partisanship in the U.S. Senate!Of course there is a partisan divide over this issue. Of course Republicans want to make some political hay. As Rep. Henry Hyde, R-Ill., put it, "You have to remember the position that [we]
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Trying to capitalize on one of the hot issues of the fall campaign, Republican U.S. Senate challenger Bill Brock has gone on television with a commercial implying that incumbent Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes is soft on crime.The advertisement states that Mr. Sarbanes voted to strike death penalty provisions from the recent crime bill and opposed mandatory sentences for crimes involving a gun and for selling drugs to children."Now he tells us he's tough on crime," the narrator says. "The more you hear about Senator Sarbanes, the more he sounds like part of the problem."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 3, 1994
SENATOR SARBANES came by to chat with the editorial board. That is my signal to put a new six-year battery in my watch.I've never known a politician who paid less attention to his hometown newspapers. In every state I've ever worked as a political writer, pols hated us or loved us, but in either case kept in touch a lot. I'm not just kidding when I say Paul comes by here only once every six years.Some of his critics say he ignores everybody. They call him "the stealth senator." The non-judgmental Congressional Quarterly called him "the phantom."
NEWS
August 18, 1994
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes reacted predictably -- i.e. negatively -- to the latest increase in short-term interest rates ordered by a unanimous Federal Reserve Board acting, for the first time, with two Clinton appointees aboard. "I think it's bad for the economy," the Maryland Democrat declared, "and if it's bad for the economy it's bad for elected officials." Mr. Sarbanes is a three-term-senator seeking a fourth six-year term in November.Of course, the senator is right. No "elected official," especially one involved in a political campaign, is going to go around stumping for higher interest rates.
NEWS
December 18, 1994
Sarbanes StrengthIn a Nov. 27 Perspective article, J. Bradford Coker states his belief that Sen. Paul Sarbanes could have been defeated this year if only the GOP had fielded a stronger candidate.The alleged extreme vulnerability of Senator Sarbanes was perhaps the greatest myth of the recent electoral season.In 1976, Mr. Sarbanes won his first election to the Senate by defeating incumbent J. Glenn Beall by 57 percent to 39 percent.He followed this by taking 63 percent of the vote in 1982, 62 percent in 1988, and 59 percent this year.
NEWS
November 30, 1994
Tomorrow, Sen. Paul Sarbanes has a chance to redeem his 1993 vote on the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he opposed in a shortsighted attempt to placate organized labor. The issue this time is the ponderous but vital General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.Following last night's strong show of support from the House of Representatives, the Senate takes up GATT, where the issue remains in some doubt. Unlike the vote on NAFTA, where Senate ratification was certain even without Mr. Sarbanes' support, the Democrat's "aye" could be critical this time.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
The Republican and Democratic candidates for governor were deadlocked last night, while voters re-elected Paul S. Sarbanes, a liberal Democrat, to his fourth term in the U.S. Senate.In the Attorney General's race, Republican challenger Richard Bennett held a razor's-edge lead over the Democrat, J. Joseph Curran Jr., who was seeking his third term.Elections officials estimated the statewide turnout at 58 percent of registered voters, slightly higher than the 55 percent they predicted Monday.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Doug Birch and Robert Timberg and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writers Peter Jensen, Kate Shatzkin, Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | November 9, 1994
Democrat Parris N. Glendening and Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey split the vote almost precisely in half yesterday, making the election of Maryland's next governor dependent on absentee ballots that won't be counted until tomorrow.Mrs. Sauerbrey, the minority leader of the Maryland House, held a narrow lead over the Prince George's County executive through most of the evening and wound up carrying all but three of the state's 24 subdivisions.But Mr. Glendening -- as anticipated -- ran so strongly in populous Baltimore City and Prince George's and Montgomery counties that he moved in front at the end, by a scant 6,191 vote margin out of nearly 2.4 million votes cast.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Republicans took a giant step toward becoming America's dominant party yesterday, taking over the Senate and revoking the Democrats' 40-year lease on the House.In one of the most momentous political shifts in decades, Republicans took control of both houses of Congress for the first time since 1954. With returns still trickling in from a host of close races, Republicans were projected to capture more than the 40 seats they needed to take over the House of Representatives.Democrats had held a 256-178 majority in the last Congress, which also included an independent.
NEWS
October 31, 1994
Two hours of debate on two successive nights between Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes and his Republican challenger, William E. Brock III, confirm the view of this newspaper that Mr. Sarbanes is the stronger candidate. In a year when incumbents are under attack, Senator Sarbanes went over to the offensive and was able to stay there despite the fumbling best efforts of his opponent.Mr. Brock, a man with distinguished past service as a legislator and Cabinet officer, simply was unable to make a strong case why he should replace Mr. Sarbanes in the U.S. Senate.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1994
Westinghouse Electric Corp. has signed a tentative agreement to sell 47 radar jamming systems to Finland, providing a much-welcome boost to the company's Linthicum operations and work for 200 workers for the next five years.The contract, whose final terms are expected to be completed later this month, could be worth an estimated $100 million.Although Westinghouse refused to say how much the proposed contract would be worth, because terms have not been completed, previous estimates have placed the cost of the jammers at between $2 million and $3 million each.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Trying to capitalize on one of the hot issues of the fall campaign, Republican U.S. Senate challenger Bill Brock has gone on television with a commercial implying that incumbent Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes is soft on crime.The advertisement states that Mr. Sarbanes voted to strike death penalty provisions from the recent crime bill and opposed mandatory sentences for crimes involving a gun and for selling drugs to children."Now he tells us he's tough on crime," the narrator says. "The more you hear about Senator Sarbanes, the more he sounds like part of the problem."
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Carroll Transit officials are likely to get most of the things on their wish list, now that $9.7 million in federal money has been approved to help bus systems in Maryland.The money, $3.5 million to $4 million of which will be sharedamong several Maryland subdivisions, was appropriated by the Senate last week and approved by the president Sept. 30, said Bill Toohey, spokesman for Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes.About $6 million goes to the Mass Transit Administration to buy buses and to improve some MTA facilities, he said.
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