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Senator Packwood

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NEWS
November 2, 1993
"We're not the Senate Select Committee on Voyeurism," said Sen. Barbara Mikulski yesterday. Maryland's junior senator is a member of the Select Ethics Committee. It is trying to get control of the personal diary of Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore., in order to determine if he has violated Senate rules or federal law.Senator Mikulski's defense of her committee is right on the mark. This exercise is not about Senator Packwood's famous sexual escapades. Senator Packwood has agreed to let the committee read those parts of the diary bearing on charges that he misbehaved sexually and then tried to cover it by intimidating witnesses.
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NEWS
September 19, 1995
CAMPAIGN FINANCE reformers in Washington are less interested in the sexual confessions in Sen. Bob Packwood's diary than in a passage that deals with the illegal use of "soft money."Soft money is what very rich special interests contribute to state and local political parties for sample ballots, grass-roots campaign material, voter registration and turnout drives. Fat cats like soft money because it is exempt from the contributions and expenditure limits of the Federal Election Campaign Act. In return for that favored treatment, such money must not be used for the direct and specific benefit of a candidate for federal office.
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NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | January 12, 1993
Paige Wagers was personally introduced to the world of sexual harassment when she was 21 and a new employee on Capitol HillBut learning about sexual harassment when you're already a victim, she says, is too late.Ms. Wagers, 39, is one of 10 former members of Sen. Bob Packwood's staff who have charged the Oregon Republican senator with making unwanted sexual advances.The Baltimore native spoke to about 250 students yesterday at her alma mater, St. Paul's School for Girls, and warned the young women about the experiences they're likely to face in the workplace.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The forced resignation of Bob Packwood represents a rupture in the ranks of the nation's most prominent Old Boys Club, but Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski says it has little to do with changing sexual mores.By recommending expulsion of a senator who was accused not only of 18 instances of sexual misconduct, but also of tampering with evidence and abusing his office for personal gain, the Senate Ethics Committee was simply following standards that would be used in any other workplace, Senator Mikulski said in an interview last week.
NEWS
November 8, 1993
The Sun finds itself in the rather lonely position of opposing the Senate's decision (by a vote of 94-6) to ask the federal judiciary to order Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore., to turn over all of his diaries and notes to its Ethics Committee. We don't take this position out of support for Senator Packwood. We don't think of ourselves as standing with him.We think of ourselves as standing with three of his more respectable colleagues -- Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., Sen. John Danforth, R-Mo. and Sen. Alan Simpson, R-Wyo.
NEWS
July 27, 1995
It is hard to believe Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky is opposing public Ethics Committee hearings on charges against fellow Republican Sen. Bob Packwood of Oregon. Senator Packwood stands accused of engaging in sexual misconduct with 17 women, obstructing a Senate committee investigation and abuse of office. "Accused" doesn't mean "guilty," but the Ethics Committee, of which Senator McConnell is chairman, has already found that there is "substantial credible evidence" that Senator Packwood behaved as charged.
NEWS
May 21, 1993
The Senate Rules Committee was absolutely correct to reject the challenge to Sen. Bob Packwood's election. That is true even if Senator Packwood, the Oregon Republican, lied about having sexually harassed numerous women -- including employees -- while a senator. Neither the lying nor the harassment itself would justify the Senate's overturning the results of a bona fide election.It is not sexist to say so. The most forceful argument against those who wanted the committee to urge the Senate to overturn the election was presented by one of the committee's newest members, freshman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California.
NEWS
September 19, 1995
CAMPAIGN FINANCE reformers in Washington are less interested in the sexual confessions in Sen. Bob Packwood's diary than in a passage that deals with the illegal use of "soft money."Soft money is what very rich special interests contribute to state and local political parties for sample ballots, grass-roots campaign material, voter registration and turnout drives. Fat cats like soft money because it is exempt from the contributions and expenditure limits of the Federal Election Campaign Act. In return for that favored treatment, such money must not be used for the direct and specific benefit of a candidate for federal office.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
Sen. Bob Packwood is the first senator in history to "take the Fifth." He has done so to keep from having to turn over his diary to the Senate Ethics Committee. This means he is invoking the Fifth Amendment's privilege against self-incrimination. ("No person . . . shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.") The Senate Ethics Committee has subpoenaed Mr. Packwood's diary in connection with its investigation of charges that he had harassed women, including Senate employees, and tried to cover that up by intimidating witnesses.
NEWS
December 4, 1992
Sen. Bob Packwood is under fire at home and in the U.S. Senate, accused of harassing women in his office. They were his employees or lobbyists, women whose livelihood depended on not offending him. The charges, if true, indicate a bullying abuse of power.Senator Packwood has, in effect, admitted his guilt -- saying that he did not realize his advances were "discomforting" or "embarrassing," and that he was probably acting under the influence of too much alcohol. Those excuses are classic and lame.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | September 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The political execution of Bob Packwood was carried out by the Senate with its usual devotion to ritual and ceremony. Once he announced he was finally leaving, colleagues determined to bury him took to the Senate floor to praise him.Hyperbole and hypocrisy are staples of American politics, and nowhere more obviously than in Congress. Those who are defeated or drummed out always are the subjects of eulogies that might make any sensible person wonder why they are going.But the real message in the swift and certain punishment levied against Bob Packwood is that even the Senate has changed.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Scott Higham contributed to this article | September 8, 1995
For years after women were galvanized by the all-male Senate Judiciary Committee's treatment of Anita Hill and her sexual harassment charges, the rallying cry was: "They just don't get it."Yesterday, when Sen. Bob Packwood resigned rather than face possible expulsion for charges that included sexual harassment, feminists were ready to modify that slogan."I think that they finally got it," said Maripat Blankenheim, spokeswoman for 9 to 5, the National Association of Working Women. "This is a strong message to working women everywhere and to the men who supervise them: This type of action that Senator Packwood both engaged in, and saw nothing wrong with, is not going to be tolerated."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a stunning development, the Senate Ethics Committee recommended unanimously yesterday that Bob Packwood be expelled from the Senate for a long pattern of groping and kissing women against their will and for obstructing an investigation of his actions.Last night, Mr. Packwood angrily denounced the committee's actions and said he had no plans to resign. "I want to think about this for a minute, and I want to talk to some people and I am not going to make instantaneous decisions," he said at a news conference.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | August 22, 1995
Boston. -- Won't somebody please offer Bob Packwood a nice cottage by the sea for a couple of weeks? After all, he can't go home for the summer break. Oregon may be a nice place to represent but it's not a place he can peacefully visit.As it is, the Congress is scattered to the 50 states, and Mr. Packwood is spending his days as a house guest of media folk like Larry King, Jane Pauley and Forrest Sawyer. Instead of acquiring a tan or even a sweaty blush of embarrassment, he's wearing pancake makeup, an aggressive manner and talking about ''fighting fire with fire.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | August 8, 1995
SENATOR Packwood should not be a scandal. He should be a dance.Following in the great tradition of 1940s dances like the Shag and the Peabody, it will be called the Packwood. The dance steps can be found in the May report of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics:"In his Senate office in Portland, Oregon, Senator Packwood grabbed a staff worker, stood on her feet, grabbed her hair, forcibly pulled her head back, and kissed her on the mouth, forcing his tongue into her mouth. Senator Packwood also reached under her skirt and grabbed at her undergarments."
NEWS
July 27, 1995
It is hard to believe Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky is opposing public Ethics Committee hearings on charges against fellow Republican Sen. Bob Packwood of Oregon. Senator Packwood stands accused of engaging in sexual misconduct with 17 women, obstructing a Senate committee investigation and abuse of office. "Accused" doesn't mean "guilty," but the Ethics Committee, of which Senator McConnell is chairman, has already found that there is "substantial credible evidence" that Senator Packwood behaved as charged.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | November 4, 1993
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Will Rogers. Would that he were alive today. We need a journalist for the ages like him to comment on such follies as those that went on in the Senate this week.I wonder if Rogers watching this spectacle would have chosen for an epitaph: "I joked about every prominent man in my lifetime, but I never met one I didn't like." He said that in one version or another at least seven times, according to his biographer, Ben Yagoda. Interestingly, the first man he said it about was not an American politician but the Russian revolutionary, Leon Trotsky.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | August 8, 1995
SENATOR Packwood should not be a scandal. He should be a dance.Following in the great tradition of 1940s dances like the Shag and the Peabody, it will be called the Packwood. The dance steps can be found in the May report of the Senate Select Committee on Ethics:"In his Senate office in Portland, Oregon, Senator Packwood grabbed a staff worker, stood on her feet, grabbed her hair, forcibly pulled her head back, and kissed her on the mouth, forcing his tongue into her mouth. Senator Packwood also reached under her skirt and grabbed at her undergarments."
NEWS
May 18, 1995
So Sen. Bob Packwood, chairman of the powerful Senate Finance Committee, persistent champion of the feminist agenda and assorted women's causes, moderate Republican in the forefront of the fight against the extremist Gingrich agenda, lately a rare GOP advocate for Dr. Henry Foster's confirmation as surgeon general, also one of the few male senators to vote against allowing Tailgate-tainted Adm. Frank Kelso to retire with full honors -- this same Bob Packwood...
NEWS
By Mona Charen | May 12, 1994
PERHAPS now that we are to be treated to the spectacle of a president of the United States defending himself against a sexual harassment lawsuit, we will at last come to re-evaluate our confused ideas about sex, character and smears.The prevailing wisdom for the past few years has been roughly as follows: Sexual conduct is outrageous and usually illegal when it is engaged in by Republicans.Thus, the late Sen. John Tower, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and Sen. Bob Packwood were vilified (as was Gary Hart, the exception that proves the rule)
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