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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 31, 1996
"THERE'S NEVER been a president named Bob," Sen. Bob Dole likes to say on the campaign trail, suggesting, jestingly, that it's his turn.But it's not his "Bob" (or "Robert," as Speaker Newt Gingrich called him last week) that's his biggest liability. The lack of President Bobs is just a quirk. Nobody votes on a first name basis. Bob Dole's liability is his title: senator.Americans seldom elect sitting senators president. More sitting senators have been indicted and convicted of felonies than have been elected president.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | January 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton bestowed the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Bob Dole at the White House the other day, Mr. Dole broke up the president and other attendees.After the president had put the medal around his neck and led the rousing applause from the audience, Mr. Dole began: ''I, Robert J. Dole . . . do solemnly swear . . . Uh, wrong speech.'' The room melted into laughter, with Mr. Clinton leading the chorus.Continuing over the laughter, Mr. Dole cracked: ''I had a dream that I would be, this historical week, receiving something from the president.
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NEWS
April 11, 1995
"Doonesbury" cartoonist Garry Trudeau accused Sen. Bob Dole of invoking his war wounds in his presidential campaign. This prompted former Sen. Charles McC. Mathias, a frequent critic of Senator Dole's policies, to respond, "In the 35 years that we have known each other, and been in daily contact for much of that time, I have never seen Bob Dole attempt to exploit his scars of battle." Others who know Senator Dole say the same thing.But the senator's World War II heroism and suffering are in fact one of the distinguishing characteristics of his last presidential campaign, which he formally began yesterday.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | October 11, 1996
WASHINGTON -- No one who knows Jack Kemp was surprised by his Johnny-one-note focus on the tax issue during his debate with Vice President Al Gore. His remedy for a head cold is supply-side economics to expand the economy.In this case, however, Mr. Kemp's single-minded concentration was revealing in quite a different way. It showed that the Republicans really don't have any conventional issues they can use effectively against President Clinton. And that means that the hints Bob Dole has begun sending about attacking President Clinton on his character are likely to turn tougher.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 8, 1995
I'VE BEEN mulling over what Sen. Bob Dole said about there never having been a president named Bob. I think introducing a new name to the White House is a good idea.Senator Dole also could have said there never has been a president from Kansas. (Dwight Eisenhower grew up there, but he was born in Texas and prepped for high office in Washington, London and Paris.)So after much thought and prayer I have decided to make an early presidential endorsement in favor of that Kansas senator with a given name never before held by a president: Nancy Kassebaum.
NEWS
August 22, 1995
When the front-runner appears to stumble, political journalists inevitably recall Sen. Bob Dole's old Senate colleague, Sen. Edmund Sixtus Muskie. "It seems to me," said the Wall Street Journal's Albert Hunt on a Sunday political talk show, "that the case for Bob Dole basically is seniority and, inevitably, that reminds me of Ed Muskie." Howard Fineman of Newsweek put it this way on another show: "You don't need a phony straw poll to know that Bob Dole is the weakest front-runner in presidential politics since Ed Muskie."
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- More than anything said this week at the Democratic convention, a recent talk by Bob Dole -- to the National Association of Black Journalists -- may, in its way, play a role in shaping the destiny of the Democratic Party.How could a Republican shape the Democratic Party? Read on.Senator Dole offered his message without sugarcoating himself, his party or his convictions. He acknowledged that the Republican Party has made some mistakes about race. The 1964 GOP presidential nominee, Barry Goldwater, voted against the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act. Mr. Dole himself apologized for not appearing before the recent meeting of the NAACP.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A bunch of the nation's 31 Republican governors met privately with prospective GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole here the day before he announced his decision to quit the Senate. In their discussion about his lagging campaign, Senator Dole never mentioned his intent.That fact suggested the great weight he and his strategists placed on the shock value of the announcement. Certainly in Washington and political circles elsewhere, the news was indeed a shocker, considering Mr. Dole's long romance with the Senate and particularly his status as its majority leader.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | May 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The new Bob Dole reminds me a lot of Michael Jordan -- the baseball player who was hitting .200 out there in the minor leagues.Both men walked away from what they did best. Mr. Jordan, who couldn't hit a curve ball, was young enough to go back where he belonged, in Chicago playing basketball. Mr. Dole probably will not get a second chance.I admire the soon-to-be-ex-senator's guts, but I'm not sure how much else he has inside. He was a very good Senate leader over the years and over many changes in the mood of Washington, precisely because he was never fully committed to much of anything.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 17, 1995
SEN. ROBERT "BOB" DOLE of Kansas said last week that he should be elected president because "there's never been a president named 'Bob.' "Senator! You shouldn't have opened that can of worms!You were immediately followed into the race by Rep. Robert "Bob" Dornan of California. Who knows how many other Bobs will be in this before it's over.Of course, for the record, Senator Dole is right. There's never been a Bob in the White House, though some unkind Yankees of my acquaintance used to refer to President Carter as Jim Bob.In fact, there's never been a Bob presidential nominee of a major party.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | August 29, 1996
CHICAGO -- More than anything said this week at the Democratic convention, a recent talk by Bob Dole -- to the National Association of Black Journalists -- may, in its way, play a role in shaping the destiny of the Democratic Party.How could a Republican shape the Democratic Party? Read on.Senator Dole offered his message without sugarcoating himself, his party or his convictions. He acknowledged that the Republican Party has made some mistakes about race. The 1964 GOP presidential nominee, Barry Goldwater, voted against the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act. Mr. Dole himself apologized for not appearing before the recent meeting of the NAACP.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | July 25, 1996
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Can you believe it? It's late July already, time to steam some crabs and ponder a trip downyocean. Oh yes, and time to write off Bob Dole.As a serious presidential candidate, poor Senator Dole is history, all the important commentators agree. The leftish ones are mostly relieved, and some of the rightish ones are saying that the senator ought to drop out now and let the Republican convention give the nomination to someone else.Columnist Dave Barry, without taking sides, says this election seems to be between Grumpy and Weepy.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A continuing puzzlement about Bob Dole is why a man who is so widely liked and admired by Democrats as well as Republicans in the Senate has had such a hard time conveying the most appealing side of himself to the general public.The Bob Dole who was on display in his sometimes humorous and always moving farewell speech to his colleagues the other day bore no relationship to the dark and sometimes bitter figure you hear on the campaign stump and in occasional moments of pique.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | May 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The new Bob Dole reminds me a lot of Michael Jordan -- the baseball player who was hitting .200 out there in the minor leagues.Both men walked away from what they did best. Mr. Jordan, who couldn't hit a curve ball, was young enough to go back where he belonged, in Chicago playing basketball. Mr. Dole probably will not get a second chance.I admire the soon-to-be-ex-senator's guts, but I'm not sure how much else he has inside. He was a very good Senate leader over the years and over many changes in the mood of Washington, precisely because he was never fully committed to much of anything.
NEWS
May 17, 1996
IF SEN. TRENT LOTT of Mississippi, the early-line favorite, succeeds Sen. Bob Dole as majority leader of the Republican-controlled Senate, "confrontational conservatism" will reign supreme on Capitol Hill. Mr. Lott is an old buddy and soul mate of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and, even more, of House majority leader Dick Armey. He is neither in his relationship with his party's presidential nominee, long an advocate of "commonsense conservatism." There's a big difference.Mr. Dole opposed his likely successor when Mr. Lott won the party whip's job two years ago. And the Mississippian returned the favor by backing Sen. Phil Gramm in his losing primary battles with Mr. Dole earlier this year.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A bunch of the nation's 31 Republican governors met privately with prospective GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole here the day before he announced his decision to quit the Senate. In their discussion about his lagging campaign, Senator Dole never mentioned his intent.That fact suggested the great weight he and his strategists placed on the shock value of the announcement. Certainly in Washington and political circles elsewhere, the news was indeed a shocker, considering Mr. Dole's long romance with the Senate and particularly his status as its majority leader.
NEWS
July 23, 1993
Dole misses mark sniping at 'Travelgate'U.S. Sen. Robert Dole, the Kansas Republican, is like a shark that smells blood in the water.He is spending his valuable time trying to convince the American people that the "Travelgate" affair at the White House is the moral equivalent of the Watergate scandal.Senator Dole seems more concerned with the alleged conflict-of-interest involving the travel office than he was about the Iran-contra scandal or former President George Bush's policy (National Security Directive 26)
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 22, 1996
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- I had my own Dole Moment a week before the New Hampshire primary. A student I'd assigned to produce a 90-second commentary in support of a designated presidential candidate stood up to do her best for the man from Kansas.She described him as ''an American of modest beginnings who has seen his own bad fortune get worse.'' This was the case for Senator Dole.Of course, she was describing his origins in dust-bowl Kansas and his war wounds -- not his whole life. But it was a line that resonated with the soberness of this campaign.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 31, 1996
"THERE'S NEVER been a president named Bob," Sen. Bob Dole likes to say on the campaign trail, suggesting, jestingly, that it's his turn.But it's not his "Bob" (or "Robert," as Speaker Newt Gingrich called him last week) that's his biggest liability. The lack of President Bobs is just a quirk. Nobody votes on a first name basis. Bob Dole's liability is his title: senator.Americans seldom elect sitting senators president. More sitting senators have been indicted and convicted of felonies than have been elected president.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Now that Bob Dole has the nomination pinned to his lapel like a campaign button, may I suggest that he drop the ''little wife'' thing. You know, the bit where he says of Liddy, ''When she is first lady, she will not be in charge of health care. Don't worry about it. I've already worked that out.''I know it's been a real crowd-pleaser in the primaries, a thigh-slapper among the red-meat, angry-man contingent of the Republican Party. But for every point on the hate-Hillary meter, there is an unrecorded wince among women who know a put-down when they hear one. Running Liddy as the un-Hillary, running Bob as the anti-Hillary, is a bad act.For one thing, Bob Dole isn't like that.
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