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By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Dominating the discussions among Senate leaders about the shape and scope of the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton is concern that it will be an ordeal so damaging to the conduct of other public business that the nation's best interests will be served if it is short and sweet.Whatever the length, it will certainly not be sweet, and whether making it short will satisfy the legitimate demands of justice and history is debatable. The failure of the House in arriving at its two articles of impeachment without calling a single witness other than the de facto prosecutor in the case, independent counsel Kenneth Starr, has already generated much criticism.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Defense and government lawyers in the bribery trial of Maryland Sen. Ulysses S. Currie sparred for hours Thursday during final arguments, each side accusing the other of misstating the facts, then exhibiting outrage at the opponent's allegations. The federal case was handed over to the jury for deliberation Thursday afternoon. Joseph L. Evans, Currie's public defender, said that representing the 74-year-old politician was the "proudest" moment of his professional career - a "privilege" - because of his client's character as a "decent, honorable and forthright" individual.
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NEWS
October 6, 1992
Federal judges guilty of bad behavior are supposed to be removed from office by impeachment by the House and trial by the Senate. Since this is a difficult and time-consuming procedure, it has seldom been used. In many cases in which judges were not living up to the constitutional requirement of "good behavior," they have been left alone. To be truly independent and willing to put their interpretation of the Constitution above the popular mood and above politics, judges should be beyond the reach of other branches of government except in cases of obvious, outrageous misconduct.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 19, 2011
Every now and then, one of our local miscreants decides to break into a retail establishment by waiting until the wee hours and climbing down its chimney with the hope of gaining entry for grand theft. Often these chimneys haven't been used in years; they're sealed off with brick and mortar, then stuccoed. Same for the burglar - boy, does he get stuccoed. When he realizes that he can't climb out of the chimney, panic sets in. Hours, even days can go by before someone hears his pleas for help and calls the cops.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Jonathan Weisman contributed to this article | December 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A potential new complication -- a constitutional issue that may or may not be settled -- arose yesterday in the debate over whether the House will vote to impeach President Clinton.The question: If the lame-duck House approves one or more charges against the president next week shortly before its term ends, will those charges simply become a dead letter, forcing the newly elected House to start all over again in January?A Yale law professor, Bruce A. Ackerman, dropped the constitutional question into the proceedings of the House Judiciary Committee, arguing bluntly that once the current House "dies on Jan. 3, all its unfinished business dies with it."
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When Queen Caroline, consort of King George IV, was accused of adultery, one of her critics made a sardonic salute to some of her defenders: "God save the queen, and may all your wives be like her." A similar toast to Democrats opposed even to a Senate trial for President Clinton: And may all your presidents be like him.Partisan debate about the propriety of a Senate trial proceeds amid bipartisan consensus that there must never be another such president. His fate largely rests with people Democrats praise for their tepid partisanship, people known as "moderate Republicans" and known for inconsistency.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland, a veteran of the Watergate impeachment hearings, is among a small group of senior Democrats who are quietly grappling with how best -- or whether -- to proceed with the expected Senate trial of President Clinton.Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle of South Dakota this week sought the counsel of Sarbanes, in addition to that of Sen. John B. Breaux of Louisiana, an influential lawmaker who has questioned the need for a Senate trial against Clinton; Sen. Byron L. Dorgan of North Dakota, a Daschle friend among party leaders; and Sen. Robert G. Torricelli of New Jersey, the head of a Democratic political action committee that raises money for the party's Senate candidates, Democratic Senate aides said.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Some senators in both parties said yesterday that the Senate would have been far more likely to allow witnesses to testify in person at President Clinton's trial if the Republican prosecutors had called witnesses during the House impeachment proceedings.The senators' remarks suggested that the prosecutors made a tactical error in deciding not to summon any witnesses for the House Judiciary Committee hearings last fall. The House Republicans instead relied primarily on evidence compiled by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik and Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The immunity deal that Monica S. Lewinsky signed July 28 -- a standard arrangement if it had been made in an ordinary criminal case -- suddenly became the center of a roiling new constitutional controversy yesterday.That controversy promptly landed in the lap of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.It was put there by a Democratic senator sympathetic to the president, Tom Harkin of Iowa, asking Rehnquist to act, not as the head of the Supreme Court but as the presiding officer of the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writers Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman contributed to this article | December 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Some conservative lawmakers sought to put the brakes on an accelerating movement in the Senate toward censure yesterday, urging senators to first review documents that detail President Clinton's alleged relationships with womenother than Monica Lewinsky.Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee who would serve as prosecutors in a Senate trial have not ruled out using that evidence to make their case for conviction, said Michelle R. Morgan, a committee spokeswoman.The committee had not explicitly cited those documents in drafting the impeachment charges of perjury and obstruction of justice that the full House approved Saturday.
NEWS
By Susannah Rosenblatt and Susannah Rosenblatt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
CARSON CITY, Nev. - Nevada Controller Kathy Augustine - the first state official to be impeached - goes on trial before the Senate here Monday, accused of using state employees to run her political campaign. Nevada's 42 Assembly members voted unanimously Nov. 11 to impeach Augustine on ethics violations, based on a yearlong investigation by the attorney general that found she had forced staff members to do the work on public time and had stored campaign information on government computers.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 2004
PITTSBURGH - Sen. John Kerry tapped Sen. John Edwards, the folksy North Carolinian who fought him unsuccessfully for the Democratic presidential nomination, to be his vice-presidential running mate yesterday, saying the first-term senator and wealthy former trial lawyer is "ready for this job." Kerry selected Edwards - whose broad grin, populist themes and positive campaigning style made him a popular rival to the more reserved Kerry during the primary season - after a vetting process conducted in painstaking secrecy.
NEWS
By JONATHAN WEISMAN and JONATHAN WEISMAN,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Ending a tumultuous year of political scandal, the Senate acquitted President Clinton of high crimes and misdemeanors yesterday, after House prosecutors failed to muster even a bare majority of senators in favor of removing the nation's 42nd president from office.Five weeks after the Senate convened the second presidential impeachment trial in history, 50 senators voted to convict the president of obstruction of justice -- far short of the 67 votes needed to oust him. Five Republicans -- all of them Northeastern moderates -- joined all 45 Democrats in finding Clinton not guilty of obstruction.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After extensive deliberations behind closed doors, Maryland's senators, both Democrats, voted to acquit the Democratic president of the impeachment charges. They claimed that he had been hounded by Republican critics whose motivation was political.The year was 1868 and the president was Andrew Johnson, Abraham Lincoln's hapless successor. The senators were Reverdy Johnson, an experienced Washington hand, and George Vickers, a Capitol Hill neophyte. And the underlying issue was the tension lingering after the Civil War.Both senators foreshadowed one of the key defenses mounted at President Clinton's impeachment trial -- that even if the charges were true, they were not serious enough to warrant his removal from office.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Some senators in both parties said yesterday that the Senate would have been far more likely to allow witnesses to testify in person at President Clinton's trial if the Republican prosecutors had called witnesses during the House impeachment proceedings.The senators' remarks suggested that the prosecutors made a tactical error in deciding not to summon any witnesses for the House Judiciary Committee hearings last fall. The House Republicans instead relied primarily on evidence compiled by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr.
NEWS
January 30, 1999
I am so proud to be a Republican these days because they are doing what is right for this country regardless of their political futures. How dare the Democrats accuse them of acting partisan? The Democrats are the ones who have acted totally partisan from the beginning in their defense of this embarrassment of a president.During the voting on the impeachment articles, six times as many Republicans as Democrats crossed the aisle and voted with their conscience and sworn oath. Now we need 12 Senate Democrats to truly listen to the overabundance of evidence and vote their common sense.
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's impeachment trial is the 14th Senate trial in history, but only the second of a president. Like the others, his will help shape the outcome of future trials. Lyle Denniston of The Sun's national staff explores the constitutional arguments by House prosecutors laying out the precedents they want established.What does it mean to "set precedents" on impeachment?The Constitution says little on impeachment, and there have been few impeachment cases in U.S. history.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Los Angeles gay activist and Democratic fund-raiser David Mixner has given Democratic Sen. Bob Kerrey a firm message: Kerrey, whose dislike for the president is well known, may have a safe Senate seat in Nebraska, but in the unlikely event that he doesn't support Clinton in the impeachment battle, the senator's prospects for a presidential bid don't look good."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik and Lyle Denniston and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The immunity deal that Monica S. Lewinsky signed July 28 -- a standard arrangement if it had been made in an ordinary criminal case -- suddenly became the center of a roiling new constitutional controversy yesterday.That controversy promptly landed in the lap of Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.It was put there by a Democratic senator sympathetic to the president, Tom Harkin of Iowa, asking Rehnquist to act, not as the head of the Supreme Court but as the presiding officer of the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton.
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