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December 1, 2012
Your article, "New concerns arise after Rice, GOP senator meet," (Nov. 29) fails to mention what is generally accepted by insiders in Washington and that is that the Republican strategy behind the character assassination of Susan Rice is an attempt to force President Barack Obama to appoint Sen. John Kerry to fill the position of Secretary of State so that Scott Brown gets another shot at becoming senator from Massachusetts. I am not surprised that the Republican Party would stoop so low as to trash a patriotic individual in order to advance its political agenda, but I am surprised that Sen. Susan Collins, one of the few reasonable GOP senators still around, would join this unholy cabal.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
When it comes to picking their next state senator, many Harford County voters will choose between two familiar names. The Democrat is Mary-Dulany James, a four-term state delegate whose father, William S. James, was a Maryland Senate president. The Republican is Bob Cassilly, who served on Bel Air's board of town commissioners and on the Harford County Council — and whose two brothers are also running for office in Harford this year. Both James and Cassilly believe they have the experience and vision to represent Harford's interests in Annapolis, replacing Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who is retiring after 16 years in the Senate.
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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
Alfred W. Redmer Jr., the former Republican state delegate and insurance commissioner, announced Wednesday his return to politics with a run for the Maryland Senate. Redmer's entry into the race escalates early campaigning in Baltimore County for the seat that's expected to be vacated by Republican Andrew P. Harris, who plans to run for Congress a second time. Republican Del. J.B. Jennings has filed papers to become a candidate. Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., a Democrat, also is considering entering the race and recently put his Reisterstown home on the market to move to Cockeysville and establish residency in the 7th District, which includes sections of Baltimore and Harford counties.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman, mtilghman@tribune.com | May 13, 2014
Public education - the new hybrid school board, school safety and overcrowding - dominated discussions among the three candidates for the 42nd District's state Senate seat. Just six weeks before the primary, incumbent Sen. Jim Brochin, a Democrat of Towson, Democrat Connie DeJuliis, of Glen Arm, who represented Dundalk in the House of Delegates for one term in the 1990s, and Republican Tim Robinson, a physician from Timonium, faced off at the Idlewylde Community Center. Brochin, who is seeking his fourth term, will face DeJuliis in the Democratic primary election June 24. The winner will face Robinson in the general election Nov. 4. All three candidates told the audience of about 25 that they believe these issues were better handled by county officials, but promised their support.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The meeting of East Baltimore's Berea community association is packed - standing room only - and leader Julius Henson is in control. There's a tavern to oppose. A computer lab to improve. Trash to clean up. Finally, Henson turns to the queue of political candidates from across the city who've been waiting for a chance to speak. He flashes a smile, but his tone is firm. "One minute," Henson tells them. "Quickly. " Watching Henson lead one of Baltimore's most powerful community associations, an observer might forget this is the same man who was convicted last year in a high-profile election-fraud case.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Alan L. Keyes, a conservative Republican who lost to Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., three years ago, will now try to oust the state's other Democratic senator, Barbara A. Mikulski.Mr. Keyes, 41, a former United Nations official who heads TC non-profit group that monitors government spending, has filed his candidacy papers for the 1992 race and has scheduled a campaign kickoff for next Wednesday in Towson.Mr. Keyes said the public's dissatisfaction with Congress can change only through electing "better senators" who will stop the federal "spending spree."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Standing by a picnic table next to Lake Elkhorn in Columbia, Republican state Del. Martin G. Madden announced that he would run for the state Senate seat representing East Columbia, southern Howard County and Laurel.He said he hoped to surprise Democrats responsible for redrawing legislative districts, apparently to separate him from his strongest areas of support."It's an uphill race, but every race I've had has been uphill," said Mr. Madden, a 45-year-old insurance agent from Clarksville.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman | April 21, 1991
They have massed across the state, grabbing legislativ seats, upsetting a couple of county executives and capturing an entire congressional district. Now these well-heeled warriors are regrouping for an even bigger prize: the U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Barbara A. Mikulski.More than 500 Republicans, self-confident from their electoral victories, gathered at a Linthicum hotel last week for the annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Gazing toward 1992, Joyce L. Terhes, the state GOP chairwoman, gave the assembled troops their marching orders.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | September 21, 1990
In yesterday's editions, The Sun incorrectly reported the position of Richard M. Cornwell, the Republican candidate for Maryland's 10th District Senate seat, on the abortion issue. In fact, Mr. Cornwell said he holds strong personal opinions against abortion but has yet to take a position on the issue during his campaign.Ellen R. Sauerbrey, an anti-abortion state delegate who was considered the Republicans' strongest potential candidate to run against abortion-rights supporter Janice Piccinini in the 10th District Senate race, said last night she would not run for the Senate seat.
NEWS
By Peter Slevin and Peter Slevin,The Washington Post | February 15, 2009
CHICAGO - Democratic Sen. Roland Burris, appointed late last year to replace Barack Obama in the U.S. Senate, has informed Illinois lawmakers that he did not tell them the complete story about his contacts with close associates of Gov. Rod Blagojevich before he got the job. The admission came in a sworn affidavit filed quietly by Burris last week with the Illinois House, and it raises questions about the new senator's credibility as he begins to finish...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 25, 2014
Hyperchutzpahism is a condition in which an overactive chutzpah gland produces an excessive amount of chutzpah, causing people to be extremely audacious, if not obnoxious, and to cut in line at TCBY. The word, which I just made up, is taken from the Greek (hyper, for overly) and the Yiddish (chutzpah, for boldness or self-confidence.) I'm not a doctor, but I think this is what afflicts Julius Henson, the political operative - hyperchutzpahism. He can't help himself. He's chutzpadik, and not in a good way. Henson was convicted, jailed and fined for his role in the infamous "relax robocall" to suppress votes in the 2010 Maryland general election.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Anne Arundel County Councilman Daryl Jones, after having spent five months in prison for failing to file tax returns, recently remarked, "You show me a lion without scars, and I'll show you a lion that can't lead" ( "For Daryl Jones, long road back to Arundel council," Nov. 18). I think we've all had enough of politicians trying to give their embattled images a makeover so that they appear to be a phoenix rising from the ashes. While I can appreciate the tenacity of a person who has successfully navigated challenges, surviving self-inflicted wounds doesn't count as an endorsement for a person's ability to lead.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The meeting of East Baltimore's Berea community association is packed - standing room only - and leader Julius Henson is in control. There's a tavern to oppose. A computer lab to improve. Trash to clean up. Finally, Henson turns to the queue of political candidates from across the city who've been waiting for a chance to speak. He flashes a smile, but his tone is firm. "One minute," Henson tells them. "Quickly. " Watching Henson lead one of Baltimore's most powerful community associations, an observer might forget this is the same man who was convicted last year in a high-profile election-fraud case.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Marking a generational shift in Baltimore County politics, Del. John A. Olszewski Jr. is scheduled to announce Tuesday that he's running for the Dundalk-area Maryland Senate seat held by Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. for almost 50 years. Stone, like Olszewski a Democrat, confirmed Monday that he intends to retire when his current term - his 12th in the Senate - ends after next year. The 77-year-old senator previously served a term in the House of Delegates, which by the end of his term would bring his total service in the General Assembly to 52 years - a Maryland record.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The announcement last week that South Carolina's Jim DeMint is leaving his Senate seat to run the Heritage Foundation caused some in Washington to wishfully think that perhaps the move might usher in a more congenial, if not cooperative, outlook in the U.S. Senate. But while Mr. DeMint set the gold standard for ideological purity (denouncing his own party's candidates from time to time when they failed to measure up to his tea party, ultraconservative viewpoint), there are still plenty in the GOP with the flexibility of a ramrod.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 10, 2012
In a profession like politics and in a town like the nation's capital, the phenomenon of a U.S. senator voluntarily surrendering his seat for a think-tank job would have been unthinkable some years ago. The decision of Republican Jim DeMint of South Carolina, founder of the Senate Tea Party Caucus and darling of true-believing ultraconservatives, to chuck his Senate seat during his second six-year term is a measure of the growing influence of...
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
EASTON -- Former U.S. Labor Secretary William E. Brock is giving serious consideration to challenging Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes for his Senate seat next year, Republican Party sources said here yesterday."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court ruled yesterday that political party leaders in Pennsylvania, not the voters, may pick the candidates who will run in November for a vacant U.S. Senate seat -- a ruling that sets the stage for U.S. Attorney General Richard L. Thornburgh's planned return to politics.The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia ordered its decision into effect immediately, allowing state Republicans to make an early choice of a nominee to run in a special election Nov. 5 against Sen. Harris Wofford, a Democrat who holds the seat temporarily and has been named his party's nominee.
NEWS
December 1, 2012
Your article, "New concerns arise after Rice, GOP senator meet," (Nov. 29) fails to mention what is generally accepted by insiders in Washington and that is that the Republican strategy behind the character assassination of Susan Rice is an attempt to force President Barack Obama to appoint Sen. John Kerry to fill the position of Secretary of State so that Scott Brown gets another shot at becoming senator from Massachusetts. I am not surprised that the Republican Party would stoop so low as to trash a patriotic individual in order to advance its political agenda, but I am surprised that Sen. Susan Collins, one of the few reasonable GOP senators still around, would join this unholy cabal.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
A Prince George's County state legislator, C. Anthony Muse, announced Thursday that he will seek the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate in Maryland this year, challenging Sen. Ben Cardin's bid for a second term. Muse, an African-American pastor who has served in the Maryland Senate since 2007, said he is running because he feels the country is on the wrong track. "The average person is suffering," he said. He said he has had no dealings with Cardin, which he said demonstrates that the incumbent has not reached out to local leaders to assess the problems in the state.
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