Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSenate Rules
IN THE NEWS

Senate Rules

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 4, 2004
Sen. Robert H. Kittleman proposed yesterday a change to the Senate rules that would require lawmakers to vote on every bill introduced in the legislature. The rule change, which would affect only the Senate, aims to end a practice by committee chairmen to block passage of a bill by never bringing it to a vote. Kittleman, a Republican who represents Howard and Carroll counties, said the rule change, which would require a committee vote on each piece of proposed legislation, would help keep the process open.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2013
It is most disturbing that former Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and so many current members of the U.S. Senate and House do not understand that minority rule in either house of Congress was one of the fears expressed by the Framers of the Constitution ( "The nuclear option: then and now," Dec. 1). The "nuclear option" of eliminating the filibuster for certain appointments is not a reversal of the intent of the Framers - it is a return to their original intent. Indeed, the entire portion of Rule 22 of the Senate that requires any vote to be more than a majority of the quorum present is in violation of the higher ranking "supreme law of the land.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At about midday today, William H. Rehnquist will get into the back seat of a Supreme Court limousine and take a quick four-block ride into history -- to the Capitol to become the first chief justice to preside over an impeachment trial of an elected president.The initial duties for the 74-year-old chief justice will be ceremonial only.But nearly every gesture Rehnquist makes is likely to provide at least a hint of the kind of presiding officer he will be when -- and if -- a trial gets fully under way.After today's rituals, Rehnquist will be formally in charge.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
After "60 Minutes" ran a devastating piece on the deadly attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, South Carolina Sen. Lindsey O. Graham pledged to block President Barack Obama's nominees for Federal Reserve chairman and for the next secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Last week, after the CBS report was retracted because the star witness interviewed in the report, a former British security contractor, had been caught lying about whether he was at the site of the attack, the senator's position did not change.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - With the Senate locked in a fiercely partisan stalemate over President Bush's conservative judicial nominees and news of a Supreme Court vacancy possibly days away, Republicans on a key committee approved yesterday what would be a historic change in the chamber's rules on confirming federal judges. The odds are long that the proposal, crafted by Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican, will be approved by the full Senate, where it can take 67 votes - a broad bipartisan margin in the closely divided chamber - to alter the rules.
NEWS
November 26, 2010
With a divided Congress headed to Washington for the next two years, its members gravitating away from the middle on both sides of the aisle and Republicans tossing away one of the few tools available to foster compromise, the appropriation earmark, it's time to rethink Senate rules. New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall, a Democrat, has promised to force a motion on the first day of the 111 t h Congress on Jan. 5 to have the Senate consider new rules that would ultimately lower the 60-vote margin currently needed to end a filibuster.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Those tuning in to the impeachment trial this week may find themselves wondering: Is Sen. Jesse Helms dozing off? Is Sen. Edward M. Kennedy throwing an intimidating glare at the House managers? Are other senators nodding in agreement? Fidgeting? Yawning? Sneezing? Rolling their eyes incredulously?Who knows? Certainly not the average American sitting in the TV room.Senate rules prevent television cameras from showing much more than a static shot of the speaker's podium, where prosecutor after prosecutor has spoken at length about why Bill Clinton should no longer be president.
NEWS
November 3, 1998
An article in The Sun yesterday incorrectly stated the number of seats the Republican Party would have to gain in today's election to sustain a filibuster in the state Senate against a reapportionment plan. To sustain a filibuster in the Senate normally takes at least 16 votes, but maintaining filibusters against redistricting plans require 19 votes under Senate rules.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/03/98
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
A controversy over the prayers that open sessions of the Maryland Senate continued last night after a Baltimore clergyman ended his invocation with a reference to Jesus - a practice some Jewish members object to. The Rev. Reginald Thomas of the Greater Gethsemane Baptist Church apparently ignored or misunderstood requests from senators when he ended a prayer with "in Jesus' name." Jewish members, who had complained to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller last week after Senate rules requiring ecumenical prayers were ignored on three occasions during the two weeks the General Assembly has been in session, expressed outrage that their concerns had not been addressed.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
O ne of the most perplexing things about contemporary Washington is that Democrats simultaneously hold the largest majority any party has had in the Senate in decades and are utterly unable to move forward with important legislation. The key to this paradox is the Senate rule that allows for the filibuster - unlimited debate on a motion that can only be stopped by a vote of three-fifths of the chamber, or 60 senators. So the reason nothing much is getting done in Washington is that filibusters are going on all the time, right?
NEWS
July 15, 2013
Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid says he's thoroughly fed up with Republicans' abuse of the filibuster rule to block President Obama's executive branch appointees. This week he may finally get a chance to do something about it. In saying that he may invoke what is known as the "nuclear option," Mr. Reid has signaled his readiness to impose a small but significant change in the Senate rules that would reduce the number of votes needed to break a filibuster in certain circumstances - from a supermajority of 60 votes to a simple majority of 51. Mr. Reid is not proposing to eliminate the filibuster altogether, merely to prevent the minority party from derailing Senate confirmation of the president's nominees for executive agency posts.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
The Maryland Senate turned back efforts Thursday to allow taping of committee voting sessions and to make it more likely that people who come to Annapolis to testify on bills will be heard. On the recommendation of the Rules Committee,  senators rejected an effort by Sen. Allan Kittleman, a Howard County Republican, to make public an audio record of the discussions that take place before committees vote on whether to kill bills or let them move to the floor for action. The vote was 41-6 against.
NEWS
By Kate Planco Waybright and Elbridge James | January 18, 2013
Two months after American voters made it clear they want effective government - and two years before the U.S. Senate's next opportunity to reform its broken rules - that "do nothing" chamber appears poised to fix its filibuster. In its present warped form, it permits a single, unaccountable member, without even taking the floor or speaking, to obstruct both debate and voting on critical legislation affecting 315 million Americans. That's why it's essential for Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin to join with as many of their colleagues as possible in support of Senate Resolution 4, which would authorize the following reforms: •require senators who filibuster to actually keep the floor and talk; •prevent filibustering a motion to proceed; •limit the number of motions needed to go to conference with the House; •cap post-cloture debate time on nominations at two hours.
NEWS
November 26, 2010
With a divided Congress headed to Washington for the next two years, its members gravitating away from the middle on both sides of the aisle and Republicans tossing away one of the few tools available to foster compromise, the appropriation earmark, it's time to rethink Senate rules. New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall, a Democrat, has promised to force a motion on the first day of the 111 t h Congress on Jan. 5 to have the Senate consider new rules that would ultimately lower the 60-vote margin currently needed to end a filibuster.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
O ne of the most perplexing things about contemporary Washington is that Democrats simultaneously hold the largest majority any party has had in the Senate in decades and are utterly unable to move forward with important legislation. The key to this paradox is the Senate rule that allows for the filibuster - unlimited debate on a motion that can only be stopped by a vote of three-fifths of the chamber, or 60 senators. So the reason nothing much is getting done in Washington is that filibusters are going on all the time, right?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | July 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- By mid-afternoon yesterday, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski -- an experienced hand at Senate all-nighters -- had picked out her cot in the Capitol's ornate LBJ Room yesterday. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, a rookie preparing for his first overnight session in the upper chamber, broke out the bedding that his staff had given him for just such an occasion. Both were preparing for a long night ahead, a marathon floor debate between Democrats demanding a vote to pull U.S. soldiers out of Iraq and Republicans who have been using Senate rules to block the move.
NEWS
January 10, 2005
PRESIDENT BUSH'S early post-election pledges to be a unifying force were quickly broken when he chose to continue an old fight with Senate Democrats over the shape of the federal judiciary. Even before the opening of the 109th Congress, Mr. Bush announced he would renominate 20 prospective judicial candidates whom he could not get through the Senate during his first term. This is a fight he did not have to pick. Confirmation battles for federal judges are not new. During the Clinton administration, Republicans refused to act on more than 60 of the Democratic president's nominees.
NEWS
January 3, 2007
Not in the running for Father of the Year: 25-year-old Willie Pickett Jr., an adventurous driver from Evansville, was charged with drunken driving, criminal recklessness and neglect of a dependent after police noticed him changing seats with a passenger in the front seat of his car while it was going 60 miles an hour. Mr. Pickett is the father of a child, who happened to be sitting in the back seat at the time. The passenger, Daryl Wilson, 20, was charged with criminal recklessness. The toddler's mother, 24-year-old Krista Hirsch, who was also in the back seat, was charged with neglect.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.