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By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dennis DeConcini's attorney sniped at one of the chief accusers of the "Keating Five" senators yesterday, hoping to shoot down his story that Mr. DeConcini improperly sought to strike a deal for more lenient regulation of a thrift run by political contributor Charles H. Keating Jr.But the accuser, Edwin Gray, former chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, stuck doggedly by all points of his story, saying that "the whole setting" of...
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 7, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senate Democrats are breathing a heavy sigh of relief today, and Senate Republicans are gnashing their teeth, over the decision of the retiring U.S. attorney in New York not to bring criminal charges against Democratic Sen. Bob Torricelli of New Jersey for alleged acceptance of an illegal gift. The reason is that the decision shoots a huge hole through the Republicans' hopes of defeating Mr. Torricelli for re-election in November and possibly regaining control of the Senate they lost last year when GOP Sen. Jim Jeffords of Vermont jumped ship to become an independent.
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NEWS
By Providence (R.I.) Journal-Bulletin | March 8, 1991
AFTER NEARLY two years of inquiry and deliberation, the Senate Ethics Committee announced its conclusions about the Keating Five: All five senators exercised poor judgment in mixing official duties with their financial connections to indicted S&L mogul Charles Keating. But only one of the five, Alan Cranston of California, "engaged in an impermissible pattern of conduct" that might -- repeat might -- lead to disciplinary action by the full Senate.Cynics are entitled to offer their own interpretation of events.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The pursuit of power on Capitol Hill is often like a giant game of musical chairs in which congressmen scramble for seats on the most influential committees. But there are two powerful panels in Washington on which no one wants to serve: the House and the Senate ethics committees.Rendering judgment on their colleagues' conduct, committee members can damage or destroy political careers. In a field where making friends is vital, committee members are everyone's potential enemy.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
Sen. Bob Packwood is the first senator in history to "take the Fifth." He has done so to keep from having to turn over his diary to the Senate Ethics Committee. This means he is invoking the Fifth Amendment's privilege against self-incrimination. ("No person . . . shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.") The Senate Ethics Committee has subpoenaed Mr. Packwood's diary in connection with its investigation of charges that he had harassed women, including Senate employees, and tried to cover that up by intimidating witnesses.
NEWS
May 21, 1993
The Senate Rules Committee was absolutely correct to reject the challenge to Sen. Bob Packwood's election. That is true even if Senator Packwood, the Oregon Republican, lied about having sexually harassed numerous women -- including employees -- while a senator. Neither the lying nor the harassment itself would justify the Senate's overturning the results of a bona fide election.It is not sexist to say so. The most forceful argument against those who wanted the committee to urge the Senate to overturn the election was presented by one of the committee's newest members, freshman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 15, 1994
Also Thursday, an article about Sen. Bob Packwood should have stated that the Senate Ethics Committee is investigating allegations of sexual misconduct against the Oregon senator. According to the committee, the focus of its inquiry into Mr. Packwood's behavior involves "allegations of sexual misconduct, attempts to intimidate and discredit the alleged victims, and misuse of official staff in attempts to intimidate and discredit."The Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- Six months ago, Sen. Bob Packwood was treated like a skunk at a picnic.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Ethics Committee closed a chapter on one of Congress' longest-running scandals yesterday when it announced it had found "substantial credible evidence" that Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., acted improperly in his relationship with former S&L kingpin Charles H. Keating Jr.Mr. Cranston faces the prospect of formal censure on the Senate floor, if the committee recommends such action after it has given him a chance to respond to its charges.At the same time, the panel decided yesterday that no further action was warranted against the other four members of the so-called Keating Five -- senators accused of intervening with banking regulators during Mr. Keating's protracted struggle to win favorable federal treatment for his failing thrift.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 7, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senate Democrats are breathing a heavy sigh of relief today, and Senate Republicans are gnashing their teeth, over the decision of the retiring U.S. attorney in New York not to bring criminal charges against Democratic Sen. Bob Torricelli of New Jersey for alleged acceptance of an illegal gift. The reason is that the decision shoots a huge hole through the Republicans' hopes of defeating Mr. Torricelli for re-election in November and possibly regaining control of the Senate they lost last year when GOP Sen. Jim Jeffords of Vermont jumped ship to become an independent.
NEWS
By Tom Webband David Everett and Tom Webband David Everett,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- It is a remarkable cast, now reluctantly about to take center stage in the biggest financial scandal in U.S. history.There's a former astronaut. There's a war hero. There are a Senate Democratic power, a lawyer once considered to head the FBI and the head of the Senate Banking Committee.All five have earned acclaim as senators, but starting this week, the public will see them more harshly -- as "The Keating Five," the men accused of seeking favors for a notorious savings and loan executive who showered them with $1.3 million in political donations.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 15, 1994
Also Thursday, an article about Sen. Bob Packwood should have stated that the Senate Ethics Committee is investigating allegations of sexual misconduct against the Oregon senator. According to the committee, the focus of its inquiry into Mr. Packwood's behavior involves "allegations of sexual misconduct, attempts to intimidate and discredit the alleged victims, and misuse of official staff in attempts to intimidate and discredit."The Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- Six months ago, Sen. Bob Packwood was treated like a skunk at a picnic.
NEWS
January 10, 1994
Sen. Bob Packwood is the first senator in history to "take the Fifth." He has done so to keep from having to turn over his diary to the Senate Ethics Committee. This means he is invoking the Fifth Amendment's privilege against self-incrimination. ("No person . . . shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.") The Senate Ethics Committee has subpoenaed Mr. Packwood's diary in connection with its investigation of charges that he had harassed women, including Senate employees, and tried to cover that up by intimidating witnesses.
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | October 19, 1993
LAST spring Janet Reno became the star of the Clinton cabinet for her unorthodox approach to the aftermath of the assault on the Branch Davidian compound.She said that she questioned her decision "every day" and emotionally described her feelings of loneliness.Simply by acting accountable, Ms. Reno tapped perhaps the only remaining vein of respect that exists in this country for public officials. It's what made Harry Truman an icon.Now we find out that the attorney general never actually fessed up that she messed up.The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
NEWS
May 21, 1993
The Senate Rules Committee was absolutely correct to reject the challenge to Sen. Bob Packwood's election. That is true even if Senator Packwood, the Oregon Republican, lied about having sexually harassed numerous women -- including employees -- while a senator. Neither the lying nor the harassment itself would justify the Senate's overturning the results of a bona fide election.It is not sexist to say so. The most forceful argument against those who wanted the committee to urge the Senate to overturn the election was presented by one of the committee's newest members, freshman Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California.
NEWS
By Providence (R.I.) Journal-Bulletin | March 8, 1991
AFTER NEARLY two years of inquiry and deliberation, the Senate Ethics Committee announced its conclusions about the Keating Five: All five senators exercised poor judgment in mixing official duties with their financial connections to indicted S&L mogul Charles Keating. But only one of the five, Alan Cranston of California, "engaged in an impermissible pattern of conduct" that might -- repeat might -- lead to disciplinary action by the full Senate.Cynics are entitled to offer their own interpretation of events.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Ethics Committee closed a chapter on one of Congress' longest-running scandals yesterday when it announced it had found "substantial credible evidence" that Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., acted improperly in his relationship with former S&L kingpin Charles H. Keating Jr.Mr. Cranston faces the prospect of formal censure on the Senate floor, if the committee recommends such action after it has given him a chance to respond to its charges.At the same time, the panel decided yesterday that no further action was warranted against the other four members of the so-called Keating Five -- senators accused of intervening with banking regulators during Mr. Keating's protracted struggle to win favorable federal treatment for his failing thrift.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Former thrift regulator Edwin Gray testified yesterday that he felt intimidated and improperly pressured by the four senators who met with him in April 1987 on behalf of savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr.But Mr. Gray said he didn't scold the senators then or later because he was seeking their support on regulatory legislation."
NEWS
By Jonathan Alter | October 19, 1993
LAST spring Janet Reno became the star of the Clinton cabinet for her unorthodox approach to the aftermath of the assault on the Branch Davidian compound.She said that she questioned her decision "every day" and emotionally described her feelings of loneliness.Simply by acting accountable, Ms. Reno tapped perhaps the only remaining vein of respect that exists in this country for public officials. It's what made Harry Truman an icon.Now we find out that the attorney general never actually fessed up that she messed up.The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Dennis DeConcini's attorney sniped at one of the chief accusers of the "Keating Five" senators yesterday, hoping to shoot down his story that Mr. DeConcini improperly sought to strike a deal for more lenient regulation of a thrift run by political contributor Charles H. Keating Jr.But the accuser, Edwin Gray, former chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, stuck doggedly by all points of his story, saying that "the whole setting" of...
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Former thrift regulator Edwin Gray testified yesterday that he felt intimidated and improperly pressured by the four senators who met with him in April 1987 on behalf of savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr.But Mr. Gray said he didn't scold the senators then or later because he was seeking their support on regulatory legislation."
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