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By Washington Bureau | January 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski has emerged as a likely candidate for the Senate ethics committee, a panel under fire for its reluctance to hold senators accountable for ethical violations, congressional officials said yesterday.Ethics committee staff members and a representative of Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell refused to comment, but other sources said the appointment of the Maryland Democrat could come as early as today. A spokesman for Ms. Mikulski said she would accept a seat on the panel, if it is offered.
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NEWS
February 21, 2008
End racing mayhem What more incentive do Maryland State Police and local law enforcement need to step up efforts to stop illegal road races than the deaths of eight spectators last weekend on a rural stretch of a Prince George's County road? More patrols, speed cameras and other deterring tactics should be implemented. But police also need more information and cooperation from the public. The crowd of 50 or 60 at the race must have known that it was an illegal activity. And anyone hearing loud racing noises could have called the police.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 7, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a stunning development, the Senate Ethics Committee recommended unanimously yesterday that Bob Packwood be expelled from the Senate for a long pattern of groping and kissing women against their will and for obstructing an investigation of his actions.Last night, Mr. Packwood angrily denounced the committee's actions and said he had no plans to resign. "I want to think about this for a minute, and I want to talk to some people and I am not going to make instantaneous decisions," he said at a news conference.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
The Sun brings you a weekly report of key votes in Congress. Issues before Congress last week Senate secrecy Senators voted, 84-13, to end the practice of senators' placing anonymous holds to block legislation and nominations. A yes vote was to require senators to identify themselves and publish their objections within three days in the Congressional Record. Ethics, lobbyist rules Senators voted, 90-8, to upgrade Senate ethics and increase oversight of lobbyists. A yes vote was to pass a bill that, in part, bars lobbyists from providing senators with meals and gifts and adds sunlight to the secretive "earmarking" of appropriations.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The pursuit of power on Capitol Hill is often like a giant game of musical chairs in which congressmen scramble for seats on the most influential committees. But there are two powerful panels in Washington on which no one wants to serve: the House and the Senate ethics committees.Rendering judgment on their colleagues' conduct, committee members can damage or destroy political careers. In a field where making friends is vital, committee members are everyone's potential enemy.
NEWS
By Richard C. Paddock and Richard C. Paddock,Los Angeles Times | December 3, 1992
PORTLAND, Ore. -- New allegations of sexual misconduct by U.S. Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore., emerged yesterday as a complaint was filed with the Senate Ethics Committee charging that he victimized at least five additional women.The complaint, filed by the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, brings to 15 the number of women alleging improper behavior by the senator over the past two decades.The five newly reported incidents date from the 1960s to the 1980s, according to the women.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Bob Packwood, in what is probably a final try to protect the secrecy of his personal diaries, asked Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist yesterday to postpone for many months Senate ethics investigators' review of those tapes and papers.The Oregon Republican's lawyers said that if Mr. Rehnquist or the full Supreme Court do not step in, the Senate Ethics Committee could start getting access to his papers next week, perhaps as early as Tuesday.He asked the chief justice to put off any Senate access to his diaries until after both a federal appeals court and, later, the Supreme Court could rule on his constitutional challenge to the Ethics Committee's subpoena for his diaries covering the past five years.
NEWS
By Judy Pasternak and Judy Pasternak,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - The top-ranking Democrat on the Senate Ethics Committee has requested a formal review of lobbying practices in the chamber to determine whether tighter restrictions are needed. "I believe a Senate-wide review of policies that relate to all current lobbying practices is in order and have conveyed that to the chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee," Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada said in a statement yesterday. Reid has repeatedly sponsored legislation and taken other action to help real estate developers, mining companies and other large economic interests in Nevada.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | January 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Bob Packwood struck a deal yesterday with Senate ethics investigators and a federal judge to postpone congressional investigation of his private diaries while he appeals to a higher court to keep them secret.Under the deal, a former U.S. solicitor general and federal judge, Kenneth W. Starr, now a Washington lawyer, will take control of the diaries and ultimately have the job of filtering out parts not related to the Senate Ethics Committee's misconduct probe.One likely consequence of the new agreement is that the Senate panel's investigation, already more than a year old, will be delayed perhaps for several months.
NEWS
February 21, 2008
End racing mayhem What more incentive do Maryland State Police and local law enforcement need to step up efforts to stop illegal road races than the deaths of eight spectators last weekend on a rural stretch of a Prince George's County road? More patrols, speed cameras and other deterring tactics should be implemented. But police also need more information and cooperation from the public. The crowd of 50 or 60 at the race must have known that it was an illegal activity. And anyone hearing loud racing noises could have called the police.
NEWS
By MARY CURTIUS and MARY CURTIUS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Two key senators began their bipartisan push yesterday to create an office of public integrity, a proposal that would significantly alter the way Congress investigates itself. Under the measure sponsored by Sens. Susan Collins, a Maine Republican who leads the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, and Connecticut's Joseph I. Lieberman, the panel's ranking Democrat, the new office could initiate probes of House and Senate members suspected of ethical violations.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
A former aide to state Sen. Richard F. Colburn has sent a complaint to the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, asking for an investigation into the aide's allegations that he was required to write academic papers and conduct other personal tasks for the senator as part of his job. Gregory A. Dukes, who resigned from Colburn's staff in December, said he made the request after learning that the ethics committee had no plans to act...
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - Faced with mounting evidence that current ethics rules do not cover new ways lobbyists have devised to curry favor with members of Congress, the House Ethics committee plans to unveil an array of proposed changes this year. But the proposals appear likely to loosen ethics restrictions, not tighten them. One change would let special interests begin to pay some of a congressman's official operating expenses. Another would increase the number of family members allowed to go on junkets paid for by private interests, a move seen as weakening the rules designed to keep members of Congress independent of outside groups.
NEWS
By Judy Pasternak and Judy Pasternak,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - The top-ranking Democrat on the Senate Ethics Committee has requested a formal review of lobbying practices in the chamber to determine whether tighter restrictions are needed. "I believe a Senate-wide review of policies that relate to all current lobbying practices is in order and have conveyed that to the chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee," Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada said in a statement yesterday. Reid has repeatedly sponsored legislation and taken other action to help real estate developers, mining companies and other large economic interests in Nevada.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
Despite the misgivings of a handful of lawmakers, the Maryland Senate gave overwhelming approval yesterday to sweeping legislation that would tighten restrictions on the ever-growing contingent of State House lobbyists. A key plank of the bill would allow the State Ethics Commission to essentially license lobbyists, and the panel could ban lobbyists who break the law from practicing in Annapolis. The legislation, which passed 43-4, largely mirrors a bill approved earlier this month by the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
WHEN THE new ethics reform legislation first came to the Senate floor Friday, the prospect was for a thinly veiled weakening -- some revisions at least and possibly removal of important provisions.Doubters of the Senate's ethical resolve were not disappointed, though in several important respects senators showed how sensitive they can be to the world outside Annapolis. Like it or not, they know tighter restrictions are coming, but how much tighter and what will be restricted?To the surprise of some, they began by approving an amendment that would deny legislators another perk -- free tickets to sporting and other events offered, not by lobbyists, but by such august bodies as the University of Maryland.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 14, 1993
And now, as a public service, we bring you the latest score in the Sen. Bob Packwood vs. Women Who Accuse Him of Sexual Misconduct controversy.Let's see: Last week 13 more women came forth with allegations that Packwood had made unwanted sexual advances toward them -- which, if you add to the 10 previous accusers, comes to . . .Packwood: 23. Women: 0.That's right. So far, none of the 23 women who claim they were on the receiving end of uninvited sexual advances by Packwood have had the satisfaction of seeing this powerful senator called to account for his behavior.
NEWS
April 5, 2006
The Sun brings you a weekly report of key votes in Congress. Issues before Congress last week Senate secrecy Senators voted, 84-13, to end the practice of senators' placing anonymous holds to block legislation and nominations. A yes vote was to require senators to identify themselves and publish their objections within three days in the Congressional Record. Ethics, lobbyist rules Senators voted, 90-8, to upgrade Senate ethics and increase oversight of lobbyists. A yes vote was to pass a bill that, in part, bars lobbyists from providing senators with meals and gifts and adds sunlight to the secretive "earmarking" of appropriations.
NEWS
January 12, 1998
Blame system for problems, instead of YoungHarold A. Carter Sr., pastor of New Shiloh Baptist Church, Alfred C. D. Vaughn, pastor of Sharon Baptist Church, senior leaders in the clergy community in this state and I journeyed to Annapolis to stand shoulder to shoulder with Sen. Larry Young during his appearance before the Senate Ethics Committee.We held a prayer service and marched with him and 50 others to the Senate Office Building, where 12 men and women gathered to consider testimony and to rule on his fate as a state senator and a person.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1997
A member of the legislative ethics panel investigating Sen. Larry Young has past business ties to a company that has contributed to two of Young's organizations.Records show that Sen. Decatur W. Trotter, a member of the Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics, was a marketing representative in 1995 for Diagnostic Health Imaging Services in Prince George's County. The Lanham-based company is affiliated with PrimeHealth, a health maintenance organization.PrimeHealth was one of the sponsors of a Las Vegas convention Young organized last month.
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