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NEWS
April 8, 2002
In Annapolis Today's highlights 10 a.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley, stepping into a role traditionally played by a legislator, O'Malley, who is widely believed to have his eye on the job Washington held first, became the first governor to deliver the traditional Washington commemoration at the invitation of Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. The governor delivered the address is the State House's recently restored Old House Chamber, across the hall from the Senate chamber where Washington resigned as commander of the Continental Army in 1783 during a brief period when Annapolis was the national capital.
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NEWS
January 17, 2000
Today's highlights: House of Delegates meets. 8 p.m. House chamber. Senate meets. 8 p.m. Senate chamber.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Chicago Tribune | January 16, 2009
WASHINGTON - Marking the end of a bizarre political odyssey, Roland Burris was sworn in as the junior senator from Illinois yesterday, taking his place in a body that not long ago vowed to bar him from its ranks. Burris took the oath of office in the Senate chamber a little more than a week after Democrats rejected his credentials as a senator because he was appointed by embattled Illinois Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich. In sharp contrast to the scene last week, when a disappointed and defiant Burris held a lonely news conference in the rain outside the Capitol, yesterday he was surrounded by fellow Democratic senators, who shook his hand and congratulated him. Sen. Richard G. Durbin, an Illinois Democrat who previously joined Senate leadership in a bid to block Burris from taking office, escorted the former Illinois comptroller to the front of the chamber.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 23, 2008
The State House is reopening after an eight-month, $10 million renovation, though planners are far from completing the wholesale redesign - and a more visitor-friendly experience - they envision for the historic building. Construction crews have repaired an aging heating and cooling system, updated a plumbing system that was in danger of rupturing and replaced unsafe electrical wiring. With that work in the final stages, moving trucks pulled around State Circle to unload boxes and furniture yesterday, and Gov. Martin O'Malley was in the building.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | March 24, 2008
With an ironclad grip on power in Annapolis and elections more than two years away, most Democrats in the Maryland General Assembly can enjoy a measure of political security. Not Sen. James Brochin. The maverick lawmaker from Baltimore County has been moved to the back row of the Senate chamber with freshman lawmakers despite his six-year seniority - a subtle retaliatory move by one of the state's most powerful Democrats for defying his party during last year's special session. His fiscally conservative and socially progressive views make him a reliable ally for neither the Democrats nor the Republicans.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | February 18, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Barry C. Black was 8 when his mother returned to their West Baltimore home one day with a record album of two sermons by Peter Marshall, the famed preacher of Washington's New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. It was a gift from the family whose house she cleaned. "I learned both of those sermons," says Black. And more than half a century later, he still knows them, putting on Marshall's high Scottish brogue as he recites: "The morning sun had been up for a few hours over the city of David ... " Marshall was chaplain of the U.S. Senate when he died in 1949.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | November 18, 2007
While Senate colleagues halted proceedings during the special legislative session to applaud Harford County Sen. J. Robert Hooper for nearly nine years of service, county Republicans began the task of looking for his successor. Hooper, 71 and in frail health, walked into the Senate chamber Thursday, ready to work on the tax package one day after announcing his resignation. He arrived in the middle of a colleague's speech on increasing the sales tax. The Republican from Street, who has represented District 35 since 1999, received a standing ovation from senators, staff and observers in the balcony.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 10, 2007
There was a full-page Re/Max ad in the Wall Street Journal recently, showcasing two dozen of the kind of homes you might expect to appeal to the paper's well-heeled readers. A $7.3 million estate on Lake Tahoe. A 70-acre Rehoboth Beach spread for $6.5 million. An oceanfront "country home" in British Columbia for $4.5 million. And then there's the Baltimore rowhouse for $335,000. Is that really the best this city has to offer? Re/Max's own Web site shows 16 Baltimore properties listed for seven figures, from a $7.2 million penthouse in the Inner Harbor to a 1929 stone Tudor for a flat $1 million in North Baltimore.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
State officials approved yesterday renovations that temporarily will displace reporters from the State House in 2006, and agreed to consider plans to re-create the Civil War-era House of Delegates chamber on the first floor of the capitol. The State House Trust, a group made up of the lieutenant governor, House speaker, Senate president, state archivist and a representative from the Maryland Historical Trust, held its first formal meeting in nearly a decade yesterday to iron out differences over an administration plan that would have permanently removed the press from the State House.
NEWS
April 7, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m.Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m.House of Delegates meets, House chamber.
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